16

Does anyone know how efficient shift and unshift are in a ruby array?

Deleting from the beginning of an array and having to move every element in memory can become very inefficient. I assume ruby does this some other way.

Any info on the following would be helpful:
- Algorithmic runtime
- Implementation
- General efficiency
- Would shift/unshift be acceptable to use for a queue (in something like C++ this would not)

Thank you!

0

4 Answers 4

16

In older versions of Ruby (before ~2012), unshift was an O(n) operation. However, an optimization was added in this commit and released in Ruby 2.0.0 that makes the unshift amortized O(1), meaning that it is guaranteed, on average, to be O(1), but an individual operation may be O(n). This is the same running time as shift.

This CS Stack Exchange post has a good explanation of how this works and how you end up with an O(1) amortized running time (it's about C++'s vector::push_back, but it works the same way).

5

I found that the simplest and most definitive way to answer this was to benchmark it.

require 'benchmark'

Benchmark.bm do |x|
    iterations = 10000000
    x.report("push") {
        a = []
        iterations.times do a.push(10) end
    }
    x.report("unshift") {
        a = []
        iterations.times do a.unshift(10) end
    }
    a = []
    iterations.times do a.push(10) end
    x.report("shift") {
        iterations.times do a.shift() end
    }
    a = []
    iterations.times do a.push(10) end
    x.report("pop") {
        iterations.times do a.pop() end
    }
end

On my system running ruby version 2.0.0 this returns the results:

             user     system      total        real
push     0.880000   0.030000   0.910000 (  0.917213)
unshift  0.920000   0.090000   1.010000 (  1.026208)
shift    0.780000   0.030000   0.810000 (  0.810293)
pop      0.710000   0.000000   0.710000 (  0.724865)

It seems that push, pop, shift, and unshift all take approximately the same amount of time.

Running this code again with different values for iterations gives me results that scale proportionally with the amount I changed iterations. This means that no matter the value of iterations, each operation always takes on average the same amount of time, meaning each operation's runtime is independent of the length of the array, and therefore has a runtime of O(1).

I would say this would be acceptable to use as a queue.

5
  • Sorry, but "scale linearly" means O(n). O(1) means it takes the same amount of time independent of the number of items. With timing information from a single set of runs, you cannot say how the algorithm scales. The way you have your test setup, the operations are tested on an Array with a different number of items on each iteration. That also prevents measuring how it scales. Instead, test how long the operations take with a small number of items in the array, say ten, and how long they takes with a larger number of items in the array, say 1000. Repeat the tests and average the results.
    – Tony
    May 5, 2019 at 20:12
  • After re-reading the answer, my comment was slightly inaccurate. It was too late to edit, so see updated comment below.
    – Tony
    May 5, 2019 at 20:20
  • Sorry, but "scale linearly" means O(n). O(1) means constant time independent of the number of items. You gave timing information from a single set of runs so we cannot see how the algorithm scales. It would be clearer to measure how long the operations take with a small number of items in the array, say ten, and how long they takes with a larger number of items in the array, say 1000. Repeat the tests and average the results. If the operations take about the same amount of time on small vs large arrays, then it is O(1). If the large array takes around 100 times longer (linear) then it is O(n).
    – Tony
    May 5, 2019 at 20:20
  • @Tony, what I said was, "They all seem to scale linearly as I change iterations", meaning that when I tried doubling the value of iterations in the code, all the timing results also doubled. I suppose I should have been clearer and included my results with different values of iterations. I think I didn't do that because I didn't want the comment to get to cluttered (I don't remember my reasoning from 2 years ago). But I do believe this is a valid way to test the runtime of each of these operations. (continued in next comment) May 7, 2019 at 19:56
  • If the total time scales linearly with number of times the operation is performed, that must mean that the operation runs in constant time. For example, if I ran this test with iterations=10, and the push test took 10 ms, that means each push is taking on average 1 ms. If I then ran this test with iterations=100 and the push test took 100ms, that means each push again took on average 1ms. This would mean that the runtime of push is constant with respect to the length of the array, since the average length of the array scales linearly with iterations. May 7, 2019 at 20:01
3

You can go over here and see C source code of the unshift method (just click on description block). It's very clear: increase memory capacity if we don't have enough already, move forward current content of the array, copy passed arguments to the free space in the beginning of our memory block. So it's O(n) for unshift.

1
  • This answer is out of date; see my answer. Mar 11 at 14:24
2

According to this article, it appears that it doesn't really shift at all, just increment a pointer and returns that. So in terms of efficiency it's ridiculously efficient (O(1)). However the article mentions a potential memory leak which may or may not be present in the more recent releases.

1
  • In 1.9.3 implementation of shift method became a bit more complicated and it really does move memory in some cases. It has something to do with type of pointer in use, but I'm not quite sure when this ARY_SHARED_P(ary) is true and when it's not.
    – KL-7
    Dec 2, 2011 at 7:44

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