70

I'm looking to reformat (replace, not validate - there are many references for validating) a phone number for display in Javascript. Here's an example of some of the data:

  • 123 4567890
  • (123) 456-7890
  • (123)456-7890
  • 123 456 7890
  • 123.456.7890
  • (blank/null)
  • 1234567890

Is there an easy way to use a regular expression to do this? I'm looking for the best way to do this. Is there a better way?

I want to reformat the number to the following: (123) 456-7890

  • 3
    And which one of those is your target format? – Till Helge Dec 2 '11 at 14:51
  • This one: (123) 456-7890 – Matt K Dec 2 '11 at 14:52
  • 3
    I'd say just strip all non-digit characters then take three substrings. – Wiseguy Dec 2 '11 at 14:53
  • 1
    @Wiseguy please post that as an answer (with an example), since that's really what OP should do. – Brian Driscoll Dec 2 '11 at 14:53
  • 1
    You also need to specify how each one of the accepted formats maps to the target format, which is not obvious at all if the input is null. Unless you are willing to use an extra conditional to weed that case out. – Jon Dec 2 '11 at 14:54

10 Answers 10

174

Assuming you want the format "(123) 456-7890":

function formatPhoneNumber(phoneNumberString) {
  var cleaned = ('' + phoneNumberString).replace(/\D/g, '')
  var match = cleaned.match(/^(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})$/)
  if (match) {
    return '(' + match[1] + ') ' + match[2] + '-' + match[3]
  }
  return null
}

Here's a version that allows the optional +1 international code:

function formatPhoneNumber(phoneNumberString) {
  var cleaned = ('' + phoneNumberString).replace(/\D/g, '')
  var match = cleaned.match(/^(1|)?(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})$/)
  if (match) {
    var intlCode = (match[1] ? '+1 ' : '')
    return [intlCode, '(', match[2], ') ', match[3], '-', match[4]].join('')
  }
  return null
}
formatPhoneNumber('+12345678900') // => "+1 (234) 567-8900"
formatPhoneNumber('2345678900')   // => "(234) 567-8900"
  • 2
    Perfect; thank you! However, I changed return (!m) ? null to return (!m) ? "" after adding this function. – Matt K Dec 2 '11 at 15:01
  • 2
    A nice lesson in how to approach a problem. I was trying to think how to match all possible cases--you eliminate the irrelevant and see if there's a match. Very nice. – Jkleg Jan 18 '14 at 19:58
  • 2
    FYI this doesn't work for numbers like +1555-555-5555 – Will May 14 '18 at 23:00
29

Possible solution:

function normalize(phone) {
    //normalize string and remove all unnecessary characters
    phone = phone.replace(/[^\d]/g, "");

    //check if number length equals to 10
    if (phone.length == 10) {
        //reformat and return phone number
        return phone.replace(/(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})/, "($1) $2-$3");
    }

    return null;
}

var phone = '(123)4567890';
phone = normalize(phone); //(123) 456-7890
19
var x = '301.474.4062';

x = x.replace(/\D+/g, '')
     .replace(/(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})/, '($1) $2-$3');

Working example here.

  • 1
    Thank you Sean, I like your short simple inline solution. – user752746 Feb 2 '18 at 23:17
  • 1
    Thanks for this! I changed it to x = x.replace(/[^\d]+/g, '') .replace(/(\d{1})(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})/, '+$1 ($2) $3-$4'); to work for adding '+1' in front of the phone number for example – Greg A Sep 1 '18 at 17:15
5

I'm using this function to format US numbers.

function formatUsPhone(phone) {

    var phoneTest = new RegExp(/^((\+1)|1)? ?\(?(\d{3})\)?[ .-]?(\d{3})[ .-]?(\d{4})( ?(ext\.? ?|x)(\d*))?$/);

    phone = phone.trim();
    var results = phoneTest.exec(phone);
    if (results !== null && results.length > 8) {

        return "(" + results[3] + ") " + results[4] + "-" + results[5] + (typeof results[8] !== "undefined" ? " x" + results[8] : "");

    }
    else {
         return phone;
    }
}

It accepts almost all imaginable ways of writing a US phone number. The result is formatted to a standard form of (987) 654-3210 x123

3

This answer borrows from maerics' answer. It differs primarily in that it accepts partially entered phone numbers and formats the parts that have been entered.

phone = value.replace(/\D/g, '');
const match = phone.match(/^(\d{1,3})(\d{0,3})(\d{0,4})$/);
if (match) {
  phone = `${match[1]}${match[2] ? ' ' : ''}${match[2]}${match[3] ? '-' : ''}${match[3]}`;
}
return phone
  • This works as you type, adding in the desired format from the source poster. After 1.5 hours of searching, I'm happy I tried this one! – fungusanthrax Nov 27 '18 at 17:15
1
var numbers = "(123) 456-7890".replace(/[^\d]/g, ""); //This strips all characters that aren't digits
if (numbers.length != 10) //wrong format
    //handle error
var phone = "(" + numbers.substr(0, 3) + ") " + numbers.substr(3, 3) + "-" + numbers.substr(6); //Create format with substrings
0

Here is one that will accept both phone numbers and phone numbers with extensions.

function phoneNumber(tel) {
var toString = String(tel),
    phoneNumber = toString.replace(/[^0-9]/g, ""),
    countArrayStr = phoneNumber.split(""),
    numberVar = countArrayStr.length,
    closeStr = countArrayStr.join("");
if (numberVar == 10) {
    var phone = closeStr.replace(/(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})/, "$1.$2.$3"); // Change number symbols here for numbers 10 digits in length. Just change the periods to what ever is needed.
} else if (numberVar > 10) {
    var howMany = closeStr.length,
        subtract = (10 - howMany),
        phoneBeginning = closeStr.slice(0, subtract),
        phoneExtention = closeStr.slice(subtract),
        disX = "x", // Change the extension symbol here
        phoneBeginningReplace = phoneBeginning.replace(/(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})/, "$1.$2.$3"), // Change number symbols here for numbers greater than 10 digits in length. Just change the periods and to what ever is needed. 
        array = [phoneBeginningReplace, disX, phoneExtention],
        afterarray = array.splice(1, 0, " "),
        phone = array.join("");

} else {
    var phone = "invalid number US number";
}
return phone;
}

phoneNumber("1234567891"); // Your phone number here
0

You can use this functions to check valid phone numbers and normalize them:

let formatPhone = (dirtyNumber) => {
 return dirtyNumber.replace(/\D+/g, '').replace(/(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})/, '($1) $2-$3');
}

let isPhone = (phone) => {
   //normalize string and remove all unnecessary characters
   phone = phone.replace(/\D+/g, '');
   return phone.length == 10? true : false;
}
0

thinking backwards

Take the last digits only (up to 10) ignoring first "1".

function formatUSNumber(entry = '') {
  const match = entry
    .replace(/\D+/g, '').replace(/^1/, '')
    .match(/([^\d]*\d[^\d]*){1,10}$/)[0]
  const part1 = match.length > 2 ? `(${match.substring(0,3)})` : match
  const part2 = match.length > 3 ? ` ${match.substring(3, 6)}` : ''
  const part3 = match.length > 6 ? `-${match.substring(6, 10)}` : ''    
  return `${part1}${part2}${part3}`
}

example input / output as you type

formatUSNumber('+1333')
// (333)

formatUSNumber('333')
// (333)

formatUSNumber('333444')
// (333) 444

formatUSNumber('3334445555')
// (333) 444-5555
-2

For US Phone Numbers

/^\(?(\d{3})\)?[- ]?(\d{3})[- ]?(\d{4})$/

Let’s divide this regular expression in smaller fragments to make is easy to understand.

  • /^\(?: Means that the phone number may begin with an optional (.
  • (\d{3}): After the optional ( there must be 3 numeric digits. If the phone number does not have a (, it must start with 3 digits. E.g. (308 or 308.
  • \)?: Means that the phone number can have an optional ) after first 3 digits.
  • [- ]?: Next the phone number can have an optional hyphen (-) after ) if present or after first 3 digits.
  • (\d{3}): Then there must be 3 more numeric digits. E.g (308)-135 or 308-135 or 308135
  • [- ]?: After the second set of 3 digits the phone number can have another optional hyphen (-). E.g (308)-135- or 308-135- or 308135-
  • (\d{4})$/: Finally, the phone number must end with four digits. E.g (308)-135-7895 or 308-135-7895 or 308135-7895 or 3081357895.

    Reference :

http://www.zparacha.com/phone_number_regex/

  • 1
    Copying stuff from other websites and then not even posting the link is pretty bad behaviour: zparacha.com/phone_number_regex – Till Helge Dec 2 '11 at 14:59
  • 1
    I am sorry, I had no idea that we have to post link. I thought we have to just provide answers to the queries posted. – Bebu Dec 2 '11 at 15:11
  • 3
    It is never ok to make another someones work look like your own. Remember it for next time that there is nothing wrong with posting links, but copying (especially without providing a link) is not. And you always have the option of editing your answer. – Till Helge Dec 2 '11 at 15:25
  • Downvoted because the author did not answer how to replace the phone number as the author requested. – BrianHVB Nov 9 '18 at 15:55

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