13

I am writing a method which accepts year as parameter. I.e. four digit number equal or less than current year. Calendar is Gregorian only (for now.. not sure about the future) and I most certainly won't need anything BC.

Which data type am I to use? Obvious solutions would be using DateTime or Int32 :

public void MyFunction(DateTime date)
{
     // year to work with: date.Year;
     // date.Month, date.Day, etc. is irrelevant and will always be
}

or

public void MyFunction(Int year)
{
     if ( year > 9999 || otherValidations == false )
     {
         //throw new Exception...
     }

     // year to work with: new DateTime(year, 1, 1);
}

Any other alternatives apart from writing my own custom data type Year?

4
  • 2
    Depends on what you are doing with it afterwards and what is calling it. Are you exposing this to as an interface? Where would the source come from? You probably only need a Int16 if all you're doing is comparing it. Commented Dec 2, 2011 at 19:19
  • 4
    Let's do not invent a wheel, I would suggest Keep It Simple and use built in int data type
    – sll
    Commented Dec 2, 2011 at 19:19
  • 3
    The year in what calendar? Gregorian? Hebrew? Hijri? Different users use different calendar systems in different locations; if you want your software to be usable by all of them, you might have some research to do. Commented Dec 2, 2011 at 19:25
  • I updated original post, yes it's Gregorian only for now. I'm really grateful for so many answers so fast, thanks a lot!
    – Sejanus
    Commented Dec 2, 2011 at 19:37

9 Answers 9

27

An int would work fine in most cases.

That's what DateTime.Year is and that's what the DateTime constructor takes in, so unless you have a specific reason for needing another data type, an integer is probably the easiest thing to work with.

1
  • 4
    I like this best because it's the simplest method (simpler than creating a special object to hold Years) and it doesn't give your user the opportunity to think other components of the DateTime are relevant.
    – deepee1
    Commented Dec 2, 2011 at 19:31
5

Probably int. Accepting a whole DateTime object would be confusing, as your method only need the year. From there, int is the logical choice since it's the type of the DateTime.Year property.

5

This depends a lot on what you are planning to do with the year. If you plan to pass it around a lot, creating your custom struct encapsulating an int may be a good idea, because you wouldn't need to validate the same number multiple times. Otherwise, a plain old int would work just fine.

3

You could wrap it into an immutable struct but basically it is an int with some constraints.

1

I would say: go for DateTime as you already have operations defined that you might need. Why reinvent the wheel?

1

Year is int. but if you can change it to property, you can add some validation in set, Also if just Input in some function you can add new function for validate it.

int year;
public int Year
{
    get
    {
        if (year > 9999)
          throw ...
        // check other constrains ...
        return year;
    }
    set
    {
       if (value > 9999)
         throw ...
       // check other constrains ...

       year = value;
    }
}

As a function:

int GetYear(int year)
{
   do validation and possibly throw an exception
   return year;
}

but if you use it just in one function there is no need to do any of them, do your validations in responsible function.

1

I would use int unless you plan to have to deal with BC or non-Gregorian years (with conversions between them). In the BC case, you might want a Year struct for display purposes via ToString. In the non-Gregorian case, things become more complicated.

1

While it is possible to use an int, but the best way is to implement a specialized struct, since it expresses your intend better:

public struct Year : IEquatable<Year>, IEquatable<DateTime>, IEquatable<int>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="year"></param>
    /// <exception cref="ArgumentOutOfRangeException">
    ///     When <see cref="year"/> is not within the range from <value>1</value> to <value>9999</value>.
    /// </exception>
    public Year(int year)
    {
        // same limits as DateTime 
        // be careful when changing this values, because it might break
        // conversion from and to DateTime 
        var min = 1;
        var max = 9999;

        if (year < min || year > max)
        {
            var message = string.Format("Year must be between {0} and {1}.", min, max);
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("year", year, message);
        }

        _value = year;
    }

    private readonly int _value;

    public bool Equals(Year other)
    {
        return _value == other._value;
    }

    public bool Equals(DateTime other)
    {
        return _value == other.Year;
    }

    public bool Equals(int other)
    {
        return _value == other;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj))
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (obj is Year) return Equals((Year) obj);
        if (obj is int) return Equals((int)obj);
        if (obj is DateTime) return Equals((DateTime) obj);
        return false;
    }

    public static Year MinValue 
    {
        get
        {
            return new Year(DateTime.MinValue.Year);
        }
    }

    public static Year MaxValue
    {
        get
        {
            return new Year(DateTime.MaxValue.Year);
        }
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _value;
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Year left, Year right)
    {
        return left.Equals(right);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Year left, Year right)
    {
        return !left.Equals(right);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _value.ToString();
    }

    public string ToString(IFormatProvider formatProvider)
    {
        return _value.ToString(formatProvider);
    }

    public string ToString(string format)
    {
        return _value.ToString(format);
    }

    public string ToString(string format, IFormatProvider formatProvider)
    {
        return _value.ToString(format, formatProvider);
    }

    public DateTime ToDateTime()
    {
        return new DateTime(_value, 1, 1);
    }

    public int ToInt()
    {
        return _value;
    }

    public static implicit operator DateTime(Year year)
    {
        return new DateTime(year._value, 1, 1);
    }

    public static explicit operator Year(DateTime dateTime)
    {
        return new Year(dateTime.Year);
    }

    public static explicit operator int(Year year)
    {
        return year._value;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="year"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    /// <exception cref="ArgumentOutOfRangeException">
    ///     When <see cref="year"/> is not within the range from <value>1</value> to <value>9999</value>.
    /// </exception>
    public static explicit operator Year(int year)
    {
        return new Year(year);
    }
}
0

Do write a custom data type Year. It's faster than asking here on SO :-) You can declare it as a struct to receive similar behavior like when using int but add your very specific constraint in the type's logic.

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