3

I'm trying to write a script that will get an IP address of a computer and check to see whether it falls in a specific range of IPs. So for example, if the IP of the machine is 192.168.0.5, the script will check to see if it falls between the range 192.168.0.10 to 192.168.0.20. So far, my script is only able to get IPs of remote machines, but I just can't figure out how I would check if the IP is in a specific range. I'd appreciate any suggestions. Thank you.

6 Answers 6

9

It might be easiest to let .NET do the work - there's an IPAddress class that can parse them to their numeric values for comparison. Here's a function that you can drop into your profile (or add to a module, or however you prefer to add PS functions):

function IsIpAddressInRange {
param(
        [string] $ipAddress,
        [string] $fromAddress,
        [string] $toAddress
    )

    $ip = [system.net.ipaddress]::Parse($ipAddress).GetAddressBytes()
    [array]::Reverse($ip)
    $ip = [system.BitConverter]::ToUInt32($ip, 0)

    $from = [system.net.ipaddress]::Parse($fromAddress).GetAddressBytes()
    [array]::Reverse($from)
    $from = [system.BitConverter]::ToUInt32($from, 0)

    $to = [system.net.ipaddress]::Parse($toAddress).GetAddressBytes()
    [array]::Reverse($to)
    $to = [system.BitConverter]::ToUInt32($to, 0)

    $from -le $ip -and $ip -le $to
}

Usage looks like:

PS> IsIpAddressInRange "192.168.0.5" "192.168.0.10" "192.168.0.20"
False
PS> IsIpAddressInRange "192.168.0.15" "192.168.0.10" "192.168.0.20"
True
2

i write a little function to do this:

function Test-IpAddressInRange {
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param (
        [Parameter(Position = 0, Mandatory = $true)][ipaddress]$from,
        [Parameter(Position = 1, Mandatory = $true)][ipaddress]$to,
        [Parameter(Position = 2, Mandatory = $true)][ipaddress]$target
    )
    $f=$from.GetAddressBytes()|%{"{0:000}" -f $_}   | & {$ofs='-';"$input"}
    $t=$to.GetAddressBytes()|%{"{0:000}" -f $_}   | & {$ofs='-';"$input"}
    $tg=$target.GetAddressBytes()|%{"{0:000}" -f $_}   | & {$ofs='-';"$input"}
    return ($f -le $tg) -and ($t -ge $tg)
}

test result:

PS C:\> Test-IpAddressInRange "192.168.0.1"  "192.168.0.100"  "192.168.0.1"
True
PS C:\> Test-IpAddressInRange "192.168.0.1"  "192.168.0.100"  "192.168.0.100"
True
PS C:\> Test-IpAddressInRange "192.168.90.1"  "192.168.100.100"  "192.168.101.101"
False
PS C:\>
1

If you're into the whole brevity thing, here is a functional hybrid of AndyHerb's comment and E.Z. Hart's answer:

function IsIpAddressInRange {
  param(
    [System.Version] $IPAddress,
    [System.Version] $FromAddress,
    [System.Version] $ToAddress
  )
  $FromAddress -le $IPAddress -and $IPAddress -le $ToAddress
}

Examples:

IsIpAddressInRange "192.168.1.50" "192.168.1.30" "192.168.1.100"
True
IsIpAddressInRange "192.168.25.75" "192.168.25.0" "192.168.25.255"
True
IsIpAddressInRange "192.168.36.240" "192.168.36.0" "192.168.36.100"
False
IsIpAddressInRange "192.168.36.240" "192.168.33.0" "192.168.37.0"
True
0
0

It's easy if mask is 255.255.255.0 in this case you can do something like this:

$a = [ipaddress]"192.168.0.5"

10..20 -contains $a.IPAddressToString.split('.')[3]

true

For different submask you have to check each ip's octect.

1
  • Your example does not return true.
    – Maybe
    Aug 31, 2023 at 18:53
-1

For seeing if an IP is in range 192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.20, for example, you can use regex and the -match operator

 $ip -match "192\.168\.1\.0?(1\d)|20"

The 0? is to allow a leading 0.

Similarly, for any range, you can use a regex.

For very simple range, use string split on . and operate on the components.

-2

Came across this one when googling, rather high hit. Just wanted to say that at least in powershell 4 and 5 it's a lot easier:

$range = "10.10.140.0-10.11.15.0"
$ipStart,$ipEnd = $range.Split("-")

$ipCheck = "10.10.250.255"

($ipCheck -ge $ipStart) -AND ($ipCheck -le $ipEnd)

This is not working, if you give an IP 192.168.25.75 within range 192.168.25.0-192.168.25.255.

2
  • 2
    This is giving false-positives, as it's treating everything as a string. It only needs a very slight tweak for it to work: $range = "40.69.0.1-40.69.31.254" $ipStart,$ipEnd = $range.Split("-") $ipCheck = [System.Version]"40.69.177.20" ($ipCheck -ge [System.Version]$ipStart) -AND ($ipCheck -le [System.Version]$ipEnd)
    – AndyHerb
    Oct 24, 2017 at 13:10
  • Yes, it gives false positive. $ipAddress = "10.101.141.255" $ipRange = "10.10.140.0-10.11.15.0" $ipStart, $ipEnd = $ipRange.Split("-") ($ipAddress -ge $ipStart) -and ($ipAddress -le $ipEnd) gives True but it has to be False.
    – Rafiq
    Jul 9, 2020 at 4:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.