I've a little question to ask you.

I have one C++ source and one header files. The C++ file uses windows.h library, makes operations using serial port(basic operations: read(), write() etc.).

What I want to do is, creating a library using these files, and use that library in my C#.Net solution.

What type of library I need to create? How can I do it? After creating library, How can I import it to C# solution?

My best regards.

Code Parts I'm using:

// MathFuncsDll.h

namespace MathFuncs
{
    class MyMathFuncs
    {
    public:
        // Returns a + b
        static __declspec(dllexport) double Add(double a, double b);

        // Returns a - b
        static __declspec(dllexport) double Subtract(double a, double b);

        // Returns a * b
        static __declspec(dllexport) double Multiply(double a, double b);

        // Returns a / b
        // Throws DivideByZeroException if b is 0
        static __declspec(dllexport) double Divide(double a, double b);
    };
}

// MathFuncsDll.cpp
// compile with: /EHsc /LD

#include "MathFuncsDll.h"

#include <stdexcept>

using namespace std;

namespace MathFuncs
{
    double MyMathFuncs::Add(double a, double b)
    {
        return a + b;
    }

    double MyMathFuncs::Subtract(double a, double b)
    {
        return a - b;
    }

    double MyMathFuncs::Multiply(double a, double b)
    {
        return a * b;
    }

    double MyMathFuncs::Divide(double a, double b)
    {
        if (b == 0)
        {
            throw new invalid_argument("b cannot be zero!");
        }

        return a / b;
    }
}

C# import part:

[DllImport("SimpleDll.dll", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public static extern double Add(double a, double b);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string a = Add(1.0, 3.0));
}
  • 1
    Do you really need C++ for this? .NET has a SerialPort class... – Scott Dec 3 '11 at 9:02
  • 1
    I know, but I have to use them. – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 9:12
  • 1
    You could use C++/CLI instead of C#, and then use your code normally. – Aan Dec 3 '11 at 9:23
  • @Adban I know sir, but it has to be a part of C# project. – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 9:36
  • @Un_NatMenDim: Still you can use what Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz said in your C# project. – Aan Dec 3 '11 at 9:37
up vote 7 down vote accepted

After several comments, here a try:

C++ Code (DLL), eg. math.cpp, compiled to HighSpeedMath.dll:

extern "C"
{
    __declspec(dllexport) int __stdcall math_add(int a, int b)
    {
        return a + b;
    }
}

C# Code, eg. Program.cs:

namespace HighSpeedMathTest
{
    using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

    class Program
    {
        [DllImport("HighSpeedMath.dll", EntryPoint="math_add", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall)]
        static extern int Add(int a, int b);

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int result = Add(27, 28);
        }
    }
}

Of course, if the entry point matches already you don't have to specify it. The same with the calling convention.

As mentioned in the comments, the DLL has to provide a C-interface. That means, extern "C", no exceptions, no references etc.

Edit:

If you have a header and a source file for your DLL, it could look like this:

math.hpp

#ifndef MATH_HPP
#define MATH_HPP

extern "C"
{
    __declspec(dllexport) int __stdcall math_add(int a, int b);
}

#endif

math.cpp

#include "math.hpp"

int __stdcall math_add(int a, int b)
{
    return a + b;
}
  • Simon, that made the trick. Thank you. but, What if I have a header file for my source file? Do I have to add extern "C" again? if so how? Thank you again... – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 14:54
  • Please see my edit. – Simon Dec 3 '11 at 15:03
  • dude, Thank you. Helped much... – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 15:22

You need to compile your C++ code into a dynamic link library and do the following in C#:

  class MyClass
  {
  [DllImport("MyDLL.dll")]
  public static extern void MyFunctionFromDll();

        static void Main()
        {
              MyFunctionFromDll();
        }
  }
  • I don't get it, could you pls expand what you mean? – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 9:15
  • Which part? You need to create a dll (in this example, the dll is called MyDLL.dll, and declare the function from the dll as showed here (in the example, MyFunctionFromDll()) – Luchian Grigore Dec 3 '11 at 9:17
  • Sir, I can't add the library I've created. Visual Studio pops out an error. In additon, I can't use DllImport keyword in my C# solution. – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 9:28
  • Why can't you use DllImport? – Luchian Grigore Dec 3 '11 at 9:29
  • Guess I need to add using System.Runtime.InteropServices; So, I don't have to add a library as a referance to use in C# solution? Just using DllImport? – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 9:36

You may use C# DllImport and Dllexport for DLL Interop walkthrough as a starting point. And here is the Platform Invoke Tutorial

Hope this helps.

In addition to Lichian's offer to compile to a regular DLL and use p/invoke which is probably the simplest way You can also create your C++ as a COM component (probably something you don't want to do) and the 3rd option you have is to add a thin layer of C++/CLI e.g.

using namespace System;

namespace youcomany{ namespace CPPWrapper
{
    Wrapper::Function(String^ parameter)
    {
        //call the rest of you C++ from here
        }
}}
  • The official name currently is C++/CLI not managed C++. – Aan Dec 3 '11 at 9:34
  • Hi sir. Could you please expand? Calling rest of C++? – bakar Dec 3 '11 at 9:49
  • it is just that C++/CLI is C++ and you can call whatever you like. create regular C++ object with new and CLI objects with gcnew – Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Dec 3 '11 at 9:59
  • Generally speaking if you need to pass simple parameters between C# and C++. DLLImport would probably be easier. If you need to pass complex type C++/CLI is easier – Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Dec 3 '11 at 10:04

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