89

In C#, there is a nice syntax sugar for fields with getter and setter. Moreover, I like the auto-implemented properties which allow me to write

public Foo foo { get; private set; }

In C++ I have to write

private:
    Foo foo;
public:
    Foo getFoo() { return foo; }

Is there some such concept in the C++11 allowing me to have some syntax sugar on this?

  • 57
    It could be done with a couple of macros. runs away in shame – Mankarse Dec 3 '11 at 15:53
  • 6
    @Eloff: Just making everything public is ALWAYS a bad idea. – Kaiserludi Oct 8 '14 at 19:10
  • 7
    There is no such concept! And you don't need it too: seanmiddleditch.com/why-c-does-not-need-c-like-properties – CinCout Jan 29 '15 at 9:24
  • 2
    a) this question is quite an old one b) I was asking for syntax sugar, that would allow me to get rid of the parentheses c) though the article presents valid arguments against adapting properties, whether C++ 'does or does not need' properties is very subjective. C++ is Touring-machine equivalent even without them, but that does not mean that having such syntax sugar would make C++ more productive. – Radim Vansa Jan 29 '15 at 10:55
  • 3
    Definitely not. – user2486888 Mar 12 '18 at 6:58

15 Answers 15

77

In C++ you can write your own features. Here is an example implementation of properties using unnamed classes. Wiki article

struct Foo
{
    class {
        int value;
        public:
            int & operator = (const int &i) { return value = i; }
            operator int () const { return value; }
    } alpha;

    class {
        float value;
        public:
            float & operator = (const float &f) { return value = f; }
            operator float () const { return value; }
    } bravo;
};

You can write your own getters & setters in place and if you want holder class member access you can extend this example code.

  • Any ideas about how to modify this code to still have a private member variable that Foo can access internally, while the public API only exposes the property? I could of course just make Foo a friend of alpha/beta, but then I still would have to write alpha.value, to access the value, but I would rather prefer if directly accessing the member variable from inside of Foo would feel more like accessing a member of Foo itself and not a member of a special nested property class. – Kaiserludi Oct 8 '14 at 19:30
  • 1
    @Kaiserludi Yes: in this case, make alpha and bravo private. In Foo, you can read/write with those "properties" above, but outside Foo, this wouldn't be possible anymore. To circumvent that, make a const reference which is public. It is accessible from outside, but only for reading since it is a constant reference. The only caveat is that you'll need another name for the public const reference. I'd personally use _alpha for the private variable and alpha for the reference. – Kapichu Jan 5 '15 at 21:04
  • 1
    @Kapichu: not a solution, for 2 reasons. 1) In C# property getters/setters are often used to embed safeness checks that are forced to public users of the class while allowing the member functions to access the value directly. 2) const references are not free: depending on compiler/platform they will enlarge sizeof(Foo). – ceztko May 15 '15 at 15:44
  • @psx: because of limitations of this approach, I would avoid it and wait for proper addition to the standard, if it'll ever appear. – ceztko May 15 '15 at 15:47
  • @Kapichu: But alpha and bravo in the example code are the properties. I would like to directly access the variable itself from inside of the implementation of Foo, without the need to use a property, while I would like to only expose access through a property in the API. – Kaiserludi Aug 31 '15 at 20:13
46

C++ doesn't have this built in, you can define a template to mimic properties functionality:

template <typename T>
class Property {
public:
    virtual ~Property() {}  //C++11: use override and =default;
    virtual T& operator= (const T& f) { return value = f; }
    virtual const T& operator() () const { return value; }
    virtual explicit operator const T& () const { return value; }
    virtual T* operator->() { return &value; }
protected:
    T value;
};

To define a property:

Property<float> x;

To implement a custom getter/setter just inherit:

class : public Property<float> {
    virtual float & operator = (const float &f) { /*custom code*/ return value = f; }
    virtual operator float const & () const { /*custom code*/ return value; }
} y;

To define a read-only property:

template <typename T>
class ReadOnlyProperty {
public:
    virtual ~ReadOnlyProperty() {}
    virtual operator T const & () const { return value; }
protected:
    T value;
};

And to use it in class Owner:

class Owner {
public:
    class : public ReadOnlyProperty<float> { friend class Owner; } x;
    Owner() { x.value = 8; }
};

You could define some of the above in macros to make it more concise.

  • I'm curious if this compiles-down to a zero-cost feature, I don't know if wrapping each data-member in a class instance will result in the same kind of structure-packing, for example. – Dai Mar 4 '17 at 1:57
  • 1
    The "custom getter/setter" logic could be made syntactically cleaner by the use of lambda functions, unfortunately you cannot define a lambda outside of an executable context in C++ (yet!) so without using a preprocessor macro you end up with code that's just as fiddly as dumb getters/setters, which is unfortunate. – Dai Mar 4 '17 at 2:03
  • 1
    The "class: ..." in the last example is interesting, and missing from the other examples. It creates the necessary friend-declaration - without introducing a new class name. – Hans Olsson Mar 8 '18 at 12:38
  • 1
    Very similar to stackoverflow.com/a/4225302/2311167, dated 19-Nov-2010 – Adrian W May 26 '18 at 20:00
  • A big difference between this and the 2010-Nov-19 answer is that this enables overriding the getter or setter on a case-by-case basis. That way one could vet the input to be in range, or to send a change notification out to change event listeners, or a place to hang a breakpoint. – Eljay Jul 25 at 15:32
22
+150

There is nothing in the C++ language that will work across all platforms and compilers.

But if you're willing to break cross-platform compatibility and commit to a specific compiler you may be able to use such syntax, for example in Microsoft Visual C++ you can do

// declspec_property.cpp  
struct S {  
   int i;  
   void putprop(int j) {   
      i = j;  
   }  

   int getprop() {  
      return i;  
   }  

   __declspec(property(get = getprop, put = putprop)) int the_prop;  
};  

int main() {  
   S s;  
   s.the_prop = 5;  
   return s.the_prop;  
}
18

You can emulate getter and setter to some extent by having a member of dedicated type and overriding operator(type) and operator= for it. Whether it's a good idea is another question and I'm going to +1 Kerrek SB's answer to express my opinion thereon :)

  • You can emulate calling a method upon assigning-to or reading-from by such type but you can't distinguish who calls the assign operation (to prohibit it if it's not the field owner) - what I am trying to do by specifying different access level for getter and setter. – Radim Vansa Dec 3 '11 at 16:45
  • @Flavius: Just add a friend to the field owner. – kennytm Dec 23 '11 at 9:16
17

Maybe have a look at the property class I have assembled during the last hours: https://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/7786/c11-feedback-on-my-approach-to-c-like-class-properties

It allows you to have properties behaving like this:

CTestClass myClass = CTestClass();

myClass.AspectRatio = 1.4;
myClass.Left = 20;
myClass.Right = 80;
myClass.AspectRatio = myClass.AspectRatio * (myClass.Right - myClass.Left);
  • Nice, however although this allows user-defined accessors there is not the public getter/private setter feature I was looking for. – Radim Vansa Jan 13 '12 at 23:13
17

With C++11 you can define a Property class template and use it like this:

class Test{
public:
  Property<int, Test> Number{this,&Test::setNumber,&Test::getNumber};

private:
  int itsNumber;

  void setNumber(int theNumber)
    { itsNumber = theNumber; }

  int getNumber() const
    { return itsNumber; }
};

And here ist the Property class template.

template<typename T, typename C>
class Property{
public:
  using SetterType = void (C::*)(T);
  using GetterType = T (C::*)() const;

  Property(C* theObject, SetterType theSetter, GetterType theGetter)
   :itsObject(theObject),
    itsSetter(theSetter),
    itsGetter(theGetter)
    { }

  operator T() const
    { return (itsObject->*itsGetter)(); }

  C& operator = (T theValue) {
    (itsObject->*itsSetter)(theValue);
    return *itsObject;
  }

private:
  C* const itsObject;
  SetterType const itsSetter;
  GetterType const itsGetter;
};
  • 2
    what does C::* mean? I have never seen anything like it before? – Rika Oct 20 '17 at 19:44
  • 1
    It's a pointer to a non-static member function in class C. This is similar to a plain function pointer but in order to call the member function you need to provide an object on which the function is called. This is achieved with the line itsObject->*itsSetter(theValue) in the example above. See here for a more detailed description of this feature. – Christoph Böhme Mar 12 '18 at 17:59
  • @Niceman, is there an example of usage? It appears to be very costly to have as a member. It's not particularly useful as a static member, either. – Grim Fandango Apr 18 at 15:29
15

As many other have already said, there's no built-in support in the language. However, if you are targeting the Microsoft C++ compiler you can take advantage of the Microsoft-specific extension for properties which is documented here.

This is the example from the linked page:

// declspec_property.cpp
struct S {
   int i;
   void putprop(int j) { 
      i = j;
   }

   int getprop() {
      return i;
   }

   __declspec(property(get = getprop, put = putprop)) int the_prop;
};

int main() {
   S s;
   s.the_prop = 5;
   return s.the_prop;
}
  • your link is dead – Simon Mourier Mar 8 '18 at 6:35
  • 1
    @SimonMourier link works now, has been fixed. – Кое Кто Jan 16 at 17:36
12

No, C++ has no concept of properties. Though it can be awkward to define and call getThis() or setThat(value), you are making a statement to the consumer of those methods that some functionality may occur. Accessing fields in C++, on the other hand, tells the consumer that no additional or unexpected functionality will occur. Properties would make this less obvious as property access at first glance appears to react like a field, but in fact reacts like a method.

As an aside, I was working in a .NET application (a very well known CMS) attempting to create a customer membership system. Due to the way they had used properties for their user objects, actions were firing off that I hadn't anticipated, causing my implementations to execute in bizarre ways including infinite recursion. This was because their user objects made calls to the data access layer or some global caching system when attempting to access simple things like StreetAddress. Their entire system was founded on what I would call an abuse of properties. Had they have used methods instead of properties, I think I would have figured out what was going wrong much more quickly. Had they have used fields (or at least made their properties behave more like fields), I think the system would have been easier to extend and maintain.

[Edit] Changed my thoughts. I'd had a bad day and went a bit on a rant. This cleanup should be more professional.

11

Based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/23109533/404734 here is a version with a public getter and a private setter:

struct Foo
{
    class
    {
            int value;
            int& operator= (const int& i) { return value = i; }
            friend struct Foo;
        public:
            operator int() const { return value; }
    } alpha;
};
5

You probably know that but I would simply do the following:

class Person {
public:
    std::string name() {
        return _name;
    }
    void name(std::string value) {
        _name = value;
    }
private:
    std::string _name;
};

This approach is simple, uses no clever tricks and it gets the job done!

The issue though is that some people don't like to prefix their private fields with an underscore and so they can't really use this approach, but fortunately for these who do, it's really straightforward. :)

The get and set prefixes doesn't add clarity to your API but making them more verbose and the reason I don't think they add useful information is because when someone needs to use an API if the API makes sense she will probably realize what it does without the prefixes.

One more thing, it's easy to grasp that these are properties because name isn't a verb.

Worst case scenario, if the APIs are consistent and the person didn't realize that name() is an accessor and name(value) is a mutator then she will only have to look it up once in the documentation to understand the pattern.

As much as I love C# I don't think C++ needs properties at all!

  • Your mutators make sense if one uses foo(bar) (instead of the slower foo = bar), but your accessors have nothing to do with properties at all... – Matthias Jan 22 '17 at 12:56
  • @Matthias Stating that it doesn't have anything to do with properties at all, doesn't tell me anything, can you elaborate? besides I didn't try to compare them but if you need a mutator and accessor you can use this convention. – Eyal Solnik Jan 22 '17 at 15:43
  • The question is about the software concept of Properties. Properties can be used as if they are public data members (usage), but they are actually special methods called accessors (declaration). Your solution sticks to methods (ordinary getters/setters) for the declaration and the usage. So this is, first of all, definitely not the usage the OP is asking for, but rather some strange and unconventional naming convention (and thus, secondly, also no syntactic sugar). – Matthias Jan 22 '17 at 21:41
  • As a minor side effect, your mutator surprisingly works as a Property, since in C++ one best initializes with foo(bar) instead of foo=bar which can be achieved with a void foo(Bar bar) mutator method on a _foo member variable. – Matthias Jan 22 '17 at 21:42
  • @Matthias I know what are properties, I've been writing C++ quite a bit and C# for over a decade, I'm not arguing about the benefit of properties and what they are but I never REALLY needed them in C++, in fact you're saying that they can be used as public data and that's mostly true but there are cases in C# where you can't even use properties directly, like passing a property by ref whereas with a public field, you can. – Eyal Solnik Jan 22 '17 at 23:40
4

This is not exactly a property, but it does what you want the simple way:

class Foo {
  int x;
public:
  const int& X;
  Foo() : X(x) {
    ...
  }
};

Here the big X behaves like public int X { get; private set; } in C# syntax. If you want full-blown properties, I made a first shot to implement them here.

  • 2
    This is not a good idea. Whenever you make a copy of an object of this class, the reference X of the new object will still point to the member of the old object, because it is just copied like a pointer member. This is bad in itself, but when the old object gets deleted, you get memory corruption on top of it. To make this work, you would have to also implement your own copy constructor, assignment operator and move constructor. – toster Mar 3 '17 at 14:29
4

Nope.. But you should consider if it`s just get : set function and no additional task preformed inside get:set methods just make it public.

1

Does you class really need to enforce some invariant or is it just a logical grouping of member elements? If it is the latter you should consider making the thing a struct and accessing the members directly.

1

I collected the ideas from multiple C++ sources and put it into a nice, still quite simple example for getters/setters in C++:

class Canvas { public:
    void resize() {
        cout << "resize to " << width << " " << height << endl;
    }

    Canvas(int w, int h) : width(*this), height(*this) {
        cout << "new canvas " << w << " " << h << endl;
        width.value = w;
        height.value = h;
    }

    class Width { public:
        Canvas& canvas;
        int value;
        Width(Canvas& canvas): canvas(canvas) {}
        int & operator = (const int &i) {
            value = i;
            canvas.resize();
            return value;
        }
        operator int () const {
            return value;
        }
    } width;

    class Height { public:
        Canvas& canvas;
        int value;
        Height(Canvas& canvas): canvas(canvas) {}
        int & operator = (const int &i) {
            value = i;
            canvas.resize();
            return value;
        }
        operator int () const {
            return value;
        }
    } height;
};

int main() {
    Canvas canvas(256, 256);
    canvas.width = 128;
    canvas.height = 64;
}

Output:

new canvas 256 256
resize to 128 256
resize to 128 64

You can test it online here: http://codepad.org/zosxqjTX

  • There is a memory overhead for keeping self refrences, + an akward ctor syntax. – Red.Wave Jan 27 at 18:20
  • @Red.Wave Well, write a letter to the C++ committee then... – lama12345 Jan 27 at 19:01
  • To propose properties? I guess there've been a bunch of rejected such proposals. – Red.Wave Jan 28 at 2:37
  • @Red.Wave Bow down to the lord and master of rejection then. Welcome to C++. Clang and MSVC have custom extensions for properties, if you don't want the self references. – lama12345 Jan 28 at 16:02
  • I can never bow. Not every feature is even appropariate I think. To me Objects are far more than a pair of setter+getter functions. I have tried own implementations avoiding the unnecessary permanent memory overhead, but the syntax and chore of declaring instances was not satisfactory; I was drawn to using declarative macros, but I am not a big fan of macros anyhow. And my approach finally, led to porperties accessed with function syntax, which many including myself don't approve. – Red.Wave Jan 28 at 16:17
0

There are a set of macros written Here. THis has convinient property declarations for value types, reference types, read only types, strong and weak types.

class MyClass {

 // Use assign for value types.
 NTPropertyAssign(int, StudentId)

 public:
 ...

}

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