256
SELECT logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm
   , DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
FROM statslogsummary
WHERE daysdiff > 120

I get

"invalid column name daysdiff".

Maxlogtm is a datetime field. It's the little stuff that drives me crazy.

1
  • not sure for mysql, but maybe the alias needs to be wrapped in ticks `daysdiff`. Dec 3, 2011 at 19:00

10 Answers 10

290
SELECT
   logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm,
   DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
FROM statslogsummary
WHERE ( DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE() > 120)

Normally you can't refer to field aliases in the WHERE clause. (Think of it as the entire SELECT including aliases, is applied after the WHERE clause.)

But, as mentioned in other answers, you can force SQL to treat SELECT to be handled before the WHERE clause. This is usually done with parenthesis to force logical order of operation or with a Common Table Expression (CTE):

Parenthesis/Subselect:

SELECT
   *
FROM
(
   SELECT
      logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm,
      DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
   FROM statslogsummary   
) as innerTable
WHERE daysdiff > 120

Or see Adam's answer for a CTE version of the same.

7
  • 25
    This is not possible directly, because chronologically, WHERE happens before SELECT, which always is the last step in the execution chain. REFER - stackoverflow.com/questions/356675/… Dec 21, 2012 at 1:26
  • afaik if the alias in the select is a correlated subquery this will work while the CTE solution won't. May 31, 2016 at 9:15
  • As Pascal mentioned in his answer here stackoverflow.com/a/38822328/282887, you can use HAVING clause which seems to work faster than subqueries.
    – Bakhtiyor
    Mar 26, 2019 at 8:06
  • @Bakhtiyor The HAVING answer doesn't work in most SQL environments, including MS-SQL which this question is about. (In T-SQL, HAVING requires an aggregate function.)
    – Jamie F
    Mar 26, 2019 at 13:45
  • I never knew you couldn't reference aliases until I came across this issue just now. Love the workaround... does this have any major performance implications?
    – Mr. Boy
    Dec 10, 2021 at 10:13
97

If you want to use the alias in your WHERE clause, you need to wrap it in a sub select, or CTE:

WITH LogDateDiff AS
(
   SELECT logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm
      , DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
   FROM statslogsummary
)
SELECT logCount, logUserId, maxlogtm, daysdiff
FROM LogDateDiff
WHERE daysdiff > 120
3
  • 2
    Do you happen to know how this fairs efficiency wise? Is there extra overhead using a CTE?
    – James
    Jul 4, 2014 at 9:20
  • 5
    A CTE is just prettier syntax for a sub-query, so the performance would be similar to that. In my experience, the performance difference has not been something that has concerned me for operations like this, but it should be fairly simple to test it in your environment to see if your specific table/query is adversely affected with this vs. calling out the formula specifically in the where clause. I suspect you will not notice a difference. Jul 4, 2014 at 17:17
  • CTEs are super nice until you try to use one as a subquery. i've had to resort to creating them as views to nest them. i consider this a serious SQL shortcoming
    – symbiont
    Aug 21, 2017 at 13:55
22

The most effective way to do it without repeating your code is use of HAVING instead of WHERE

SELECT logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm
   , DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
FROM statslogsummary
HAVING daysdiff > 120
4
  • 3
    I think using HAVING on aliases is not standard (it does works on MySQL, though). Specifically, I think it does not work with SQL Server.
    – tokland
    Nov 25, 2016 at 12:10
  • 5
    SQL Server: [S0001][207] Invalid column name 'daysdiff'
    – Vadzim
    Nov 2, 2017 at 17:28
  • 8
    SQL Server: [S0001][8121] Column 'day' is invalid in the HAVING clause because it is not contained in either an aggregate function or the GROUP BY clause.
    – Vadzim
    Nov 2, 2017 at 17:28
  • @Vadzim - I just get the error Invalid column name '<name>'. Either way, it doesn't work in SQL Server...
    – dcafdg
    Oct 19, 2022 at 23:30
11

If you don't want to list all your columns in CTE, another way to do this would be to use outer apply:

select
    s.logcount, s.logUserID, s.maxlogtm,
    a.daysdiff
from statslogsummary as s
    outer apply (select datediff(day, s.maxlogtm, getdate()) as daysdiff) as a
where a.daysdiff > 120
0
9

How about using a subquery(this worked for me in Mysql)?

SELECT * from (SELECT logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm
   , DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
FROM statslogsummary) as 'your_alias'
WHERE daysdiff > 120
7

HAVING works in MySQL according to documentation:

The HAVING clause was added to SQL because the WHERE keyword could not be used with aggregate functions.

2
  • 3
    The question is about sql-server though
    – baltermia
    Jun 9, 2021 at 9:12
  • 3
    despite the question being about SQL Server, this answer was very helpful for us using mysql who got to here by google! Google doesnt index the question tags, so thanks for this answer!
    – Tommy
    Oct 20, 2021 at 17:50
5

You could refer to column alias but you need to define it using CROSS/OUTER APPLY:

SELECT s.logcount, s.logUserID, s.maxlogtm, c.daysdiff
FROM statslogsummary s
CROSS APPLY (SELECT DATEDIFF(day, s.maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff) c
WHERE c.daysdiff > 120;

DBFiddle Demo

Pros:

  • single definition of expression(easier to maintain/no need of copying-paste)
  • no need for wrapping entire query with CTE/outerquery
  • possibility to refer in WHERE/GROUP BY/ORDER BY
  • possible better performance(single execution)
2
  • 1
    its worth to mention that it only works in SQL Server
    – Martin
    Oct 26, 2018 at 13:49
  • 2
    @MartinZinovsky Question is tagged with sql-server and t-sql :) Oct 26, 2018 at 14:31
2

For me, the simplest way to use an ALIAS in the WHERE clause is to create a sub-query and select from it instead.

Example:

WITH Q1 AS (
    SELECT LENGTH(name) AS name_length,
    id,
    name
    FROM any_table
)

SELECT id, name, name_length FROM Q1 WHERE name_length > 0
1

Came here looking something similar to that, but with a CASE WHEN, and ended using the where like this: WHERE (CASE WHEN COLUMN1=COLUMN2 THEN '1' ELSE '0' END) = 0 maybe you could use DATEDIFF in the WHERE directly. Something like:

SELECT logcount, logUserID, maxlogtm
FROM statslogsummary
WHERE (DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE())) > 120
0

Use the HAVING clause because the WHERE keyword cannot be used with aggregate functions.

SELECT
    logcount,
    logUserID,
    maxlogtm,
    DATEDIFF(day, maxlogtm, GETDATE()) AS daysdiff
FROM statslogsummary
HAVING daysdiff > 120

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