121

What is the fastest and most elegant way of doing list of lists from two lists?

I have

In [1]: a=[1,2,3,4,5,6]

In [2]: b=[7,8,9,10,11,12]

In [3]: zip(a,b)
Out[3]: [(1, 7), (2, 8), (3, 9), (4, 10), (5, 11), (6, 12)]

And I'd like to have

In [3]: some_method(a,b)
Out[3]: [[1, 7], [2, 8], [3, 9], [4, 10], [5, 11], [6, 12]]

I was thinking about using map instead of zip, but I don't know if there is some standard library method to put as a first argument.

I can def my own function for this, and use map, my question is if there is already implemented something. No is also an answer.

2
  • 1
    Well, do you really need lists? What are you going to do with the results? Dec 4, 2011 at 2:56
  • 17
    An example would be sklearn, where many times data must be organized in this fashion. Dec 1, 2013 at 8:15

7 Answers 7

127

If you are zipping more than 2 lists (or even only 2, for that matter), a readable way would be:

[list(a) for a in zip([1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9])]

This uses list comprehensions and converts each element in the list (tuples) into lists.

74

You almost had the answer yourself. Don't use map instead of zip. Use map AND zip.

You can use map along with zip for an elegant, functional approach:

list(map(list, zip(a, b)))

zip returns a list of tuples. map(list, [...]) calls list on each tuple in the list. list(map([...]) turns the map object into a readable list.

1
  • the unfortunate decision to make python 3 collections operations return a generator imposes the cost of the double list in here. Jun 1, 2019 at 3:55
16

I love the elegance of the zip function, but using the itemgetter() function in the operator module appears to be much faster. I wrote a simple script to test this:

import time
from operator import itemgetter

list1 = list()
list2 = list()
origlist = list()
for i in range (1,5000000):
        t = (i, 2*i)
        origlist.append(t)

print "Using zip"
starttime = time.time()
list1, list2 = map(list, zip(*origlist))
elapsed = time.time()-starttime
print elapsed

print "Using itemgetter"
starttime = time.time()
list1 = map(itemgetter(0),origlist)
list2 = map(itemgetter(1),origlist)
elapsed = time.time()-starttime
print elapsed

I expected zip to be faster, but the itemgetter method wins by a long shot:

Using zip
6.1550450325
Using itemgetter
0.768098831177
5
  • 2
    This is a transpose of what the OP is trying to do. Could you update your post to reflect that? I.e., OP is converting two lists to list or arbitrary number of pairs. You are converting an arbitrary number of pairs to a pair of lists. Jul 20, 2016 at 15:46
  • Which python version is this measured with?
    – Moberg
    Sep 15, 2016 at 9:27
  • I don't remember, it was over two years ago, but most likely 2.6 or 2.7. I imagine you can copy the code and try it on your own version/platform.
    – kslnet
    Sep 15, 2016 at 18:52
  • 2
    python 2 zip creates a real list. That slows things down. Try replacing zip with itertools.izip then. Nov 18, 2017 at 19:23
  • In Python 3.5, zip takes 3.5 seconds and itemgetter takes 0.10 seconds. For those fond of list comprehensions, list1 = [x[0] for x in origlist] works just as well as list1 = map(itemgetter(0), origlist). Nov 9, 2018 at 14:47
4

I generally don't like using lambda, but...

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b = [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> c = lambda a, b: [list(c) for c in zip(a, b)]
>>> c(a, b)
[[1, 6], [2, 7], [3, 8], [4, 9], [5, 10]]

If you need the extra speed, map is slightly faster:

>>> d = lambda a, b: map(list, zip(a, b))
>>> d(a, b)
[[1, 6], [2, 7], [3, 8], [4, 9], [5, 10]]

However, map is considered unpythonic and should only be used for performance tuning.

4
  • 4
    What does lambda add here? One can just write the expression instead of calling a function (it's really not complicated), and even if one wants a function for it, it can be defined painlessly in two lines (one if your return key is broken or you're insane). map on the other hand is perfectly fine if the first argument would be a plain function (as opposed to a lambda).
    – user395760
    Dec 4, 2011 at 1:03
  • 1
    Well he asked for a function. But I agree-- probably better just to pay the extra line. As for map, I believe list comprehensions are almost always clearer. Dec 4, 2011 at 1:08
  • 1
    I would recommend map over lambda. so map(list, zip(a,b)). List comprehensions may be a little clearer, but map should be faster (untested) Dec 4, 2011 at 1:15
  • I mean, again, if the OP needs speed, map is the way to go. But in general, and in Python especially, emphasize readability over speed (else you dip into premature optimization). Dec 4, 2011 at 1:18
4

List comprehension would be very simple solution I guess.

a=[1,2,3,4,5,6]

b=[7,8,9,10,11,12]

x = [[i, j] for i, j in zip(a,b)]

print(x)

output : [[1, 7], [2, 8], [3, 9], [4, 10], [5, 11], [6, 12]]
3

How about this?

>>> def list_(*args): return list(args)

>>> map(list_, range(5), range(9,4,-1))
[[0, 9], [1, 8], [2, 7], [3, 6], [4, 5]]

Or even better:

>>> def zip_(*args): return map(list_, *args)
>>> zip_(range(5), range(9,4,-1))
[[0, 9], [1, 8], [2, 7], [3, 6], [4, 5]]
1
  • That seems to me a better answer than the rest as here we are reducing one step by not doing a zip and directly creating a list. Awesome Nov 2, 2015 at 5:53
3

Using numpy

The definition of elegance can be quite questionable but if you are working with numpy the creation of an array and its conversion to list (if needed...) could be very practical even though not so efficient compared to using the map function or the list comprehension.

import numpy as np 
a = b = range(10)
zipped = zip(a,b)
# result = np.array(zipped).tolist() Python 2.7
result = np.array(list(zipped)).tolist()
Out: [[0, 0],
 [1, 1],
 [2, 2],
 [3, 3],
 [4, 4],
 [5, 5],
 [6, 6],
 [7, 7],
 [8, 8],
 [9, 9]]

Otherwise skipping the zip function you can use directly np.dstack:

np.dstack((a,b))[0].tolist()
3
  • The first example does not work for me, np.array(zipped) is a array(<class 'zip'>, dtype=object), putting it into a list just return a zip Jun 29, 2021 at 6:41
  • however np.array(list(zipped)).tolist() will work Jun 29, 2021 at 6:46
  • 1
    @JeanBouvattier thanks for your comment, yes this is because in Python 3 zip is no more a list but a zip object
    – G M
    Jun 29, 2021 at 7:23

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