54

I want to serialize an object to XML, but I don't want to save it on the disk. I want to hold it in a XElement variable (for using with LINQ), and then Deserialize back to my object.

How can I do this?

  • 1
    please consider changing the accepted answer due to comment I've added to Abdul's reply. Do not make others use solution which is acceptable, - they would better use solution which is perfect (of Surjit Samra or Eren Ersönmez). – Sasha Feb 1 '17 at 15:46
93

You can use these two extension methods to serialize and deserialize between XElement and your objects.

public static XElement ToXElement<T>(this object obj)
{
    using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using (TextWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(memoryStream))
        {
            var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
            xmlSerializer.Serialize(streamWriter, obj);
            return XElement.Parse(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(memoryStream.ToArray()));
        }
    }
}

public static T FromXElement<T>(this XElement xElement)
{
        var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        return (T)xmlSerializer.Deserialize(xElement.CreateReader());
}

USAGE

XElement element = myClass.ToXElement<MyClass>();
var newMyClass = element.FromXElement<MyClass>();
  • 5
    Nice solution to create extension methods. – comecme Dec 4 '11 at 17:26
  • 11
    You should either use public static XElement ToXElement<T>(this T obj) – Po-ta-toe Dec 22 '11 at 9:23
  • 5
    Doesn't StreamWriter default to Encoding.UTF8, not Encoding.ASCII? Ref: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wtbhzte9.aspx . – Jesse C. Slicer Jun 11 '13 at 16:20
  • 3
    The perf of this approach if we first write the object to string xml and then to XElement might not be the most optimal? – user1234883 May 22 '14 at 17:54
  • 7
    You should use Encoding.UTF8 instead of Encoding.ASCII. Otherwise, if you have a string property like "На берегу пустынных волн", this will break. Or you can by-pass explicitly using MemoryStream or Encoding (see my answer). – Eren Ersönmez Mar 5 '15 at 7:53
25

You can use XMLSerialization

XML serialization is the process of converting an object's public properties and fields to a serial format (in this case, XML) for storage or transport. Deserialization re-creates the object in its original state from the XML output. You can think of serialization as a way of saving the state of an object into a stream or buffer. For example, ASP.NET uses the XmlSerializer class to encode XML Web service messages

and XDocument Represents an XML document to achieve this

   using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using System.Xml.Serialization;


namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
  public class Person
  {
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
  }

  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

      XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Person));

      Person p = new Person();
      p.Age = 35;
      p.Name = "Arnold";

      Console.WriteLine("\n Before serializing...\n");
      Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Age = {0} Name = {1}", p.Age,p.Name));

      XDocument d = new XDocument();
      using (XmlWriter xw = d.CreateWriter())
        xs.Serialize(xw, p);

      // you can use LINQ on elm now

      XElement elm = d.Root;

      Console.WriteLine("\n From XElement...\n");

      elm.Elements().All(e => { Console.WriteLine(string.Format("element name {0} , element value {1}", e.Name, e.Value)); return true; });

      //deserialize back to object
      Person pDeserialized = xs.Deserialize((d.CreateReader())) as Person;

      Console.WriteLine("\n After deserializing...\n");
      Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Age = {0} Name = {1}", p.Age, p.Name));

      Console.ReadLine();

    }
  }


}

and here is output enter image description here

  • I think you meant to write the following after the deserialization: Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Age = {0} Name = {1}", pDeserialized.Age, pDeserialized.Name)); – Patrick Koorevaar Sep 5 '17 at 11:31
12

(Late answer)

Serialize:

var doc = new XDocument();
var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));
using (var writer = doc.CreateWriter())
{
    xmlSerializer.Serialize(writer, obj);
}
// now you can use `doc`(XDocument) or `doc.Root` (XElement)

Deserialize:

MyClass obj; 
using(var reader = doc.CreateReader())
{
    obj = (MyClass)xmlSerializer.Deserialize(reader);
}
0

ToXelement without Code Analysis issues, same answer as Abdul Munim but fixed the CA issues (except for CA1004, this cannot be resolved in this case and is by design)

    public static XElement ToXElement<T>(this object value)
    {
        MemoryStream memoryStream = null;
        try
        {
            memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
            using (TextWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(memoryStream))
            {
                memoryStream = null;
                var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
                xmlSerializer.Serialize(streamWriter, value);
                return XElement.Parse(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(memoryStream.ToArray()));
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (memoryStream != null)
            {
                memoryStream.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
  • What is the reason of not wrapping memory stream with using? – MaLiN2223 Apr 10 '18 at 13:15
-1

What about

public static byte[] BinarySerialize(Object obj)
        {
            byte[] serializedObject;
            MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
            BinaryFormatter b = new BinaryFormatter();
            try
            {
                b.Serialize(ms, obj);
                ms.Seek(0, 0);
                serializedObject = ms.ToArray();
                ms.Close();
                return serializedObject;
            }
            catch
            {
                throw new SerializationException("Failed to serialize. Reason: ");
            }

        }
  • 12
    catch (a real exception) followed by throw some new rubbish exception that has no ability to convey the useful information of the original exception ("Failed to serialize. Reason: ") is terrible. Just don't catch, or if you want a fake catch for a breakpoint, then simply do "throw;". Hiding the real exception is bad coding. – Dirk Bester Aug 5 '12 at 0:39
  • thanks for comment – Esi Aug 20 '12 at 10:08

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