68

Working with Nodejs and MongoDB through Node MongoDB native driver. Need to retrieve some documents, and make modification, then save them right back. This is an example:

db.open(function (err, db) {
  db.collection('foo', function (err, collection) {
    var cursor = collection.find({});
    cursor.each(function (err, doc) {
      if (doc != null) {
        doc.newkey = 'foo'; // Make some changes
        db.save(doc); // Update the document
      } else {
        db.close(); // Closing the connection
      }
    });
  });
});

With asynchronous nature, if the process of updating the document takes longer, then when cursor reaches the end of documents, database connection is closed. Not all updates are saved to the database.

If the db.close() is omitted, all the documents are correctly updated, but the application hangs, never exits.

I saw a post suggesting using a counter to track number of updates, when fall back to zero, then close the db. But am I doing anything wrong here? What is the best way to handle this kind of situation? Does db.close() have to be used to free up resource? Or does a new db connection needs to open?

24

Here's a potential solution based on the counting approach (I haven't tested it and there's no error trapping, but it should convey the idea).

The basic strategy is: Acquire the count of how many records need to be updated, save each record asynchronously and a callback on success, which will decrement the count and close the DB if the count reaches 0 (when the last update finishes). By using {safe:true} we can ensure that each update is successful.

The mongo server will use one thread per connection, so it's good to either a) close unused connections, or b) pool/reuse them.

db.open(function (err, db) {
  db.collection('foo', function (err, collection) {
    var cursor = collection.find({});
    cursor.count(function(err,count)){
      var savesPending = count;

      if(count == 0){
        db.close();
        return;
      }

      var saveFinished = function(){
        savesPending--;
        if(savesPending == 0){
          db.close();
        }
      }

      cursor.each(function (err, doc) {
        if (doc != null) {
          doc.newkey = 'foo'; // Make some changes
          db.save(doc, {safe:true}, saveFinished);
        }
      });
    })
  });
});
  • 5
    @realguess, also there are libs for concurrency utils that can help you do this stuff so you don't have to manage the details. check out async.js, for example github.com/caolan/async – mpobrien Dec 8 '11 at 20:41
  • @mpobrien, could you elaborate on how to use async to solve this problem? – Márcio Paiva Jan 13 '14 at 4:05
  • Do you think this solutions still holds in 2017 or do you know of anything better? I was thinking about something like this, but what if the function in cursor.each(function (err, doc) { calls an async function, that thus would execute logic in a callback and potentially need the database after each() finishes? And what if after subsequent changes in the software, that callback calls another async function (I hope you get the idea)? – watery Jan 15 '18 at 19:24
14

It's best to use a pooled connection and then call db.close() in cleanup function at the end of your application's life:

process.on('SIGINT', cleanup);
process.on('SIGTERM', cleanup);

See http://mongodb.github.io/node-mongodb-native/driver-articles/mongoclient.html

A bit old thread, but anyway.

  • This actually causes problems for me. Occasionally when I restart my service I get Mongo "Topology was destroyed" errors because the connections seem to get cut off. Am I doing something wrong? – ifightcrime May 27 '16 at 21:34
  • 1
    @ifightcrime: sounds like a running query, while you have closed the connection. Depends, whether you need the queries to finish. If you have writes you need to wait for, I guess you have to track that they're done manually. You can try to find how it works exactly here: github.com/mongodb/node-mongodb-native/blob/2.1/lib/db.js#L366 – pkopac May 30 '16 at 7:19
4

I found that using counter may apply to simple scenario, but may be hard in complicated situations. Here is a solution that I come up by closing the database connection when database connection is idle:

var dbQueryCounter = 0;
var maxDbIdleTime = 5000; //maximum db idle time

var closeIdleDb = function(connection){
  var previousCounter = 0;
  var checker = setInterval(function(){
    if (previousCounter == dbQueryCounter && dbQueryCounter != 0) {
        connection.close();
        clearInterval(closeIdleDb);
    } else {
        previousCounter = dbQueryCounter;
    }
  }, maxDbIdleTime);
};

MongoClient.connect("mongodb://127.0.0.1:27017/testdb", function(err, connection)(
  if (err) throw err;
  connection.collection("mycollection").find({'a':{'$gt':1}}).toArray(function(err, docs) {
    dbQueryCounter ++;
  });   
  //do any db query, and increase the dbQueryCounter
  closeIdleDb(connection);
));

This can be a general solution for any database Connections. maxDbIdleTime can be set as the same value as db query timeout or longer.

This is not very elegant, but I can't think of a better way to do this. I use NodeJs to run a script that queries MongoDb and Mysql, and the script hangs there forever if the database connections are not closed properly.

  • 1
    Hey, I appreciate the answer however you need to change the clearInterval from closeIdleDb to checker :). This really helped me out – RNikoopour Mar 27 '16 at 20:07
  • Quite interesting! – watery Jan 15 '18 at 19:25
1

Based on the suggestion from @mpobrien above, I've found the async module to be incredibly helpful in this regard. Here's an example pattern that I've come to adopt:

const assert = require('assert');
const async = require('async');
const MongoClient = require('mongodb').MongoClient;

var mongodb;

async.series(
    [
        // Establish Covalent Analytics MongoDB connection
        (callback) => {
            MongoClient.connect('mongodb://localhost:27017/test', (err, db) => {
                assert.equal(err, null);
                mongodb = db;
                callback(null);
            });
        },
        // Insert some documents
        (callback) => {
            mongodb.collection('sandbox').insertMany(
                [{a : 1}, {a : 2}, {a : 3}],
                (err) => {
                    assert.equal(err, null);
                    callback(null);
                }
            )
        },
        // Find some documents
        (callback) => {
            mongodb.collection('sandbox').find({}).toArray(function(err, docs) {
                assert.equal(err, null);
                console.dir(docs);
                callback(null);
            });
        }
    ],
    () => {
        mongodb.close();
    }
);
  • Can you add some explanation about how this works and solves the problem? For those like me who don't know async. – watery Jan 16 '18 at 8:16
  • @watery, the async.series provides a way of invoking asynchronous functions in a series, where a subsequent function is not invoked until the previous has completed successfully. It provides an optional callback at the end, after all functions in the array/object have completed successfully, which I am using in this case to finally close the database connection. – Andrew Kirk Jan 16 '18 at 21:12
1

Here's a solution I came up with. It avoids using toArray and it's pretty short and sweet:

var MongoClient = require('mongodb').MongoClient;

MongoClient.connect("mongodb://localhost:27017/mydb", function(err, db) {
  let myCollection = db.collection('myCollection');
  let query = {}; // fill in your query here
  let i = 0;
  myCollection.count(query, (err, count) => { 
    myCollection.find(query).forEach((doc) => {
      // do stuff here
      if (++i == count) db.close();
    });
  });
});
  • What if other async calls that eventually write to the database are in the // do stuff here part ? Won't they find it closed? – watery Jan 16 '18 at 8:20
0

I came up with a solution that involves a counter like this. It does not depend on a count() call nor does it wait for a time out. It will close the db after all the documents in each() are exhausted.

var mydb = {}; // initialize the helper object.

mydb.cnt = {}; // init counter to permit multiple db objects.

mydb.open = function(db) // call open to inc the counter.
{
  if( !mydb.cnt[db.tag] ) mydb.cnt[db.tag] = 1;
  else mydb.cnt[db.tag]++;
}; 

mydb.close = function(db) // close the db when the cnt reaches 0.
{
  mydb.cnt[db.tag]--;
  if ( mydb.cnt[db.tag] <= 0 ) {
    delete mydb.cnt[db.tag];
    return db.close();
  }
  return null;
};

So that each time you are going to make a call like db.each() or db.save() you would use these methods to ensure the db is ready while working and closed when done.

Example from OP:

foo = db.collection('foo');

mydb.open(db); // *** Add here to init the counter.**  
foo.find({},function(err,cursor)
{
  if( err ) throw err; 
  cursor.each(function (err, doc)
  {
    if( err ) throw err;
    if (doc != null) {
      doc.newkey = 'foo';
      mydb.open(db); // *** Add here to prevent from closing prematurely **
      foo.save(doc, function(err,count) {
        if( err ) throw err;
        mydb.close(db); // *** Add here to close when done. **
      }); 
    } else {
      mydb.close(db); // *** Close like this instead. **
    }
  });
});

Now, this assumes that the second to last callback from each makes it through the mydb.open() before the last callback from each goes to mydb.close().... so, of course, let me know if this is an issue.

So: put a mydb.open(db) before a db call and put a mydb.close(db) at the return point of the callback or after the db call (depending on the call type).

Seems to me that this kind of counter should be maintained within the db object but this is my current workaround. Maybe we could create a new object that takes a db in the constructor and wrap the mongodb functions to handle the close better.

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