5

I am trying to understand bishift operations better so I wrote myself a little program.

unsigned char a = 240;
a= (a << 3) >> 7;
printf("a: %u\n",a);

Now I would imagine that the result would be something like :

11110000 // 240
10000000 // << 3
00000001 // >> 7

So 1, but I get 15. I am confused... Any help is appreciated!

2
  • 1
    You've tagged this as both c++ and c. Which is it?
    – Polynomial
    Dec 4, 2011 at 18:57
  • 1
    You could do this: ((a << 3) & 0xFF) >> 7
    – harold
    Dec 4, 2011 at 18:58

4 Answers 4

9

Your problem is that this statement : (a << 3) converts the input to an int . So at this point you have 240 * 2 ^ 3 = 1920

00000000000000000000011110000000

Then you are dividing the previous result by 2 ^ 7 = 128 so you have : 15

00000000000000000000000000001111

Which is exactly what you are getting as a result.

If you wanted to truncate bits you could have used :

printf("a: %u\n",a & 1); //get only last bit so you would have 1 as a result!
printf("a: %u\n",a & 255); //get all 8 bits

Hope this helped!

1
  • The other solution, of course, is a cast back to unsigned char.
    – Polynomial
    Dec 4, 2011 at 18:57
3

The expressions are evaluated as (unsigned) ints. (default int promotion). Casting(truncation) to a narrower type only happens just prior to the final assignment.

3

When you shifted, it casted a into an integer type larger than 8 bits, so the top 4 bits were saved

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    unsigned char a = 240;
    a = (a << 3);
    a = (a >> 7);
    printf("a: %u\n",a);

    return 0;
}

prints 1

1

While shifting the types are automatically promoted to int which is wider than char (most often). So, it can store all your bits.

To get what you expect you would have to do

a = a << 3;
a = a >> 7;

or

a = ((unsigned char)(a << 3)) >> 7;
1
  • ... or even a <<= 3; a >>= 7;.
    – glglgl
    Dec 4, 2011 at 19:19

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