12

I want to compare two vectors and find out if the items they have are the same no matter the order the items are in.

So..

right now in clojure:

(= [1 2 3] [3 2 1]) ;=> false

I want:

(other_fun [1 2 3] [3 2 1]) ;=> true

(other_fun [1 2 3 4] [3 2 1]) ;=> false

I could not find a containsAll like in java

19

If you don't care about duplicates, you could create sets from both vectors and compare these:

(= (set [1 2 3]) (set [3 2 1])) ;=> true

As a function:

(defn set= [& vectors] (apply = (map set vectors)))
29

If you do care about duplicates, you can compare their frequency maps. These are maps with each collection element as a key and number of occurrences as a value. You create them using standard function frequencies, like in given examples.

Different order, same number of duplicates:

(= (frequencies [1 1 2 3 4])(frequencies [4 1 1 2 3]))

evaluates true.

Different order, different number of duplicates:

(= (frequencies [1 1 2 3 4])(frequencies [4 1 2 3]))

evaluates false.

So, you can write a function:

(defn other_fun [& colls]
  (apply = (map frequencies colls)))
2
  • 1
    Works for maps too! – kopos Jan 23 '20 at 10:24
  • Since Clojure = equality is by value, = indeed works for more complex structures like maps. What a useful language design decision: Favoring productivity over performance. You can still compare by pointer using identical? if necessary btw. – Ory Band 2 days ago
11

If you don't care about duplicates, other answers a perfectly applicable and efficient. But if you do care about duplicates, probably the easiest way to compare two vectors is sorting and comparing:

user=> (= (sort [3 5 2 2]) (sort [2 2 5 3]))
true
user=> (= (sort [3 5 2 2]) (sort [2 5 3]))
false
5

Create sets from them:

user=> (= (set [1 2 3]) (set [3 2 1]))
true


user=> (defn other_func [col1 col2]
        (= (set col1) (set col2)))
#'user/other_func
user=> (other_func [1 2 3] [3 2 1])
true
3

You're on the JVM already, so if you want containsAll, then just use containsAll, right?

2
  • 1
    containsAll determines whether one collection is a subset of the other collection. It does not determine set equality. – Confusion Mar 24 '13 at 19:26
  • 2
    @Confusion You can use a.containsAll(b) && b.containsAll(a). – bfontaine Sep 5 '16 at 7:43
1
(defn other_fun
  "checkes the presence of the elements of vec1 in vec2 and vice versa"
  [vec1 vec2]
  (if (or (some nil?
             (for [a vec1 b [vec2]]  (some #(= % a) b)))
       (some nil?
             (for [a vec2 b [vec1]]  (some #(= % a) b))))
    false
    true))

(other_fun [1 2 3] [3 2 1]) ;=> true

(other_fun [1 2 3 4] [3 2 1]) ;=> false
1
  • 1
    You can simplify (if x false true) as (not x). – bfontaine Sep 5 '16 at 7:43

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