112

I am trying to resize an img with a percentage of itself. For example, I just want to shrink the image by half by resizing it to 50%. But applying width: 50%; will resize the image to be 50% of the container element (the parent element which maybe the <body> for example).

Question is, can I resize the image with a percentage of itself without using javascript or server side? (I have no direct information of the image size)

I am pretty sure you cannot do this, but I just want to see whether there are intelligent CSS only solution. Thanks!

  • It will take up the percentage of the containing element if you would use width: <number>%. I don't think there is a way to do it! – Aniket Dec 6 '11 at 8:45

11 Answers 11

112

I have 2 methods for you.

Method 1. demo on jsFiddle

This method resize image only visual not it actual dimensions in DOM, and visual state after resize centered in middle of original size.

html:

<img class="fake" src="example.png" />

css:

img {
  -webkit-transform: scale(0.5); /* Saf3.1+, Chrome */
     -moz-transform: scale(0.5); /* FF3.5+ */
      -ms-transform: scale(0.5); /* IE9 */
       -o-transform: scale(0.5); /* Opera 10.5+ */
          transform: scale(0.5);
             /* IE6–IE9 */
             filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(M11=0.9999619230641713, M12=-0.008726535498373935, M21=0.008726535498373935, M22=0.9999619230641713,SizingMethod='auto expand');
}​

Browser support note: browsers statistics showed inline in css.

Method 2. demo on jsFiddle

html:

<div id="wrap">
    <img class="fake" src="example.png" />
    <div id="img_wrap">
        <img class="normal" src="example.png" />
    </div>
</div>​

css:

#wrap {
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    float: left;
}

#wrap img.fake {
    float: left;
    visibility: hidden;
    width: auto;
}

#img_wrap {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
}

#img_wrap img.normal {
    width: 50%;
}​

Note: img.normal and img.fake is the same image.
Browser support note: This method will work in all browsers, because all browsers support css properties used in method.

The method works in this way:

  1. #wrap and #wrap img.fake have flow
  2. #wrap has overflow: hidden so that its dimensions are identical to inner image (img.fake)
  3. img.fake is the only element inside #wrap without absolute positioning so that it doesn't break the second step
  4. #img_wrap has absolute positioning inside #wrap and extends in size to the entire element (#wrap)
  5. The result of the fourth step is that #img_wrap has the same dimensions as the image.
  6. By setting width: 50% on img.normal, its size is 50% of #img_wrap, and therefore 50% of the original image size.
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This doesn't resize the image to 50% of it's original size, it's now 50% of the parent of img_wrap.. – Wesley May 25 '12 at 9:46
  • See my updated answer for an attempt to solve the problem. What do you think? – Wesley May 25 '12 at 10:22
  • I think it should be possible to use display:none instead of the visibility, like in my code. In your example, the space for the fake hidden image is still 'reserved' which screws up the flow if you would put content around it – Wesley May 25 '12 at 10:35
  • it is impossible, because the main trick is in two nested and floated tags. – Vladimir Starkov May 25 '12 at 11:08
  • 2
    The transform:scale() solution has a big problem though. It doesn't interact well with the CSS box model. By which I mean that it doesn't interact with it at all, so you get layout which looks all wrong. See: jsfiddle.net/kahen/sGEkt/8 – kahen Feb 4 '13 at 15:11
48

HTML:

<span>
    <img src="example.png"/>
</span>

CSS:

span {
    display: inline-block;
}
img {
    width: 50%;
}

This has got to be one of the simplest solutions using the container element approach.

When using the container element approach, this question is a variation of this question. The trick is to let the container element shrinkwrap the child image, so it will have a size equal to that of the unsized image. Thus, when setting width property of the image as a percentage value, the image is scaled relative to its original scale.

Some of the other shrinkwrapping-enabling properties and property values are: float: left/right, position: fixed and min/max-width, as mentioned in the linked question. Each has its own side-effects, but display: inline-block would be a safer choice. Matt has mentioned float: left/right in his answer, but he wrongly attributed it to overflow: hidden.

Demo on jsfiddle


Edit: As mentioned by trojan, you can also take advantage of the newly introduced CSS3 intrinsic & extrinsic sizing module:

HTML:

<figure>
    <img src="example.png"/>
</figure>

CSS:

figure {
    width: intrinsic;
}
img {
    width: 50%;
}

However, not all popular browser versions support it at the time of writing.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Anyone how to fix not collapsing span borders? fiddle – CoR Apr 7 '15 at 14:32
  • This was just what I needed... something quick and simple, thanks. I used it like this: HTML: <img src="https://www.google.com/images/srpr/logo11w.png"/> CSS: img { display: inline-block; width: 15%; } – Chnikki Jun 20 '18 at 21:14
  • For future readers: the correct value to set on figure is width: fit-content; as of now. Browser support is also a lot better today. – Dániel Kis-Nagy Feb 18 at 11:06
12

Try zoom property

<img src="..." style="zoom: 0.5" />

Edit: Apparently, FireFox doesn't support zoom property. You should use;

-moz-transform: scale(0.5);

for FireFox.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    There is no such CSS property as "zoom" and it's not supported by anyone but IE. It's a Microsoft proprietary thing and non-standard. – Rob Dec 6 '11 at 13:52
  • 9
    Unfortunately, this information is out-dated. Zoom is supported by Internet Explorer, Chrome and Safari browsers at the moment. FireFox and Opera doesn't support it, yet. That's why I've added the edit part. IE is the first one to support it but not the only one. – Emir Akaydın Dec 6 '11 at 15:12
  • According to this link, Opera seems to support zoom as well. FireFox is the only one which doesn't support. fix-css.com/2011/05/css-zoom – Emir Akaydın Dec 6 '11 at 15:16
  • 2
    That's why IE has lost half its market share over the last 8 years. If you can't reliably count on browsers to support something, you have no common ground. The spec is written by the browser vendors themselves. If they won't put it in there, then don't rely on it or you'll be writing multiple lines of markup like you have done. This isn't 1998 all over again. – Rob Dec 6 '11 at 18:17
  • 1
    i don't know if you noticed but "zoom" is supported by Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari and Opera. this is the proof that "zoom" is not vendor specific. only FireFox differs. so i repeat my question. what is the clean solution with compitible css property? my answer is the best answer until someone finds a proper standard solution. – Emir Akaydın May 25 '12 at 13:33
6

Another solution is to use:

<img srcset="example.png 2x">

It won't validate because the src attribute is required, but it works (except on any version of IE because srcset is not supported).

| improve this answer | |
  • @min-ming-lo The accepted answer could be changed to this, since the other one introduces problem in the layout. – afilina Oct 22 at 16:10
2

This actually is possible, and I discovered how quite by accident while designing my first large-scale responsive design site.

<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="box">
    <img src="/logo.png" alt="">
  </div>
</div>

.wrapper { position:relative; overflow:hidden; }

.box { float:left; } //Note: 'float:right' would work too

.box > img { width:50%; }

The overflow:hidden gives the wrapper height and width, despite the floating contents, without using the clearfix hack. You can then position your content using margins. You can even make the wrapper div an inline-block.

| improve this answer | |
2

This is a very old thread but I found it while searching for a simple solution to display retina (high res) screen capture on standard resolution display.

So there is an HTML only solution for modern browsers :

<img srcset="image.jpg 100w" sizes="50px" src="image.jpg"/>

This is telling the browser that the image is twice the dimension of it intended display size. The value are proportional and do not need to reflect the actual size of the image. One can use 2w 1px as well to achieve the same effect. The src attribute is only used by legacy browsers.

The nice effect of it is that it display the same size on retina or standard display, shrinking on the latter.

| improve this answer | |
0
function shrinkImage(idOrClass, className, percentShrinkage){
'use strict';
    $(idOrClass+className).each(function(){
        var shrunkenWidth=this.naturalWidth;
        var shrunkenHeight=this.naturalHeight;
        $(this).height(shrunkenWidth*percentShrinkage);
        $(this).height(shrunkenHeight*percentShrinkage);
    });
};

$(document).ready(function(){
    'use strict';
     shrinkImage(".","anyClass",.5);  //CHANGE THE VALUES HERE ONLY. 
});

This solution uses js and jquery and resizes based only on the image properties and not on the parent. It can resize a single image or a group based using class and id parameters.

for more, go here: https://gist.github.com/jennyvallon/eca68dc78c3f257c5df5

| improve this answer | |
0

Although it does not answer the question directly, one way to scale images is relative to the size (especially width) of the viewport, which is mostly the use case for responsive design. No wrapper elements needed.

img {
    width: 50vw;
}
<img src="" />

| improve this answer | |
-1

This is a not-hard approach:

<div>
    <img src="sample.jpg" />
</div>

then in css:
div {
    position: absolute;
}

img, div {
   width: ##%;
   height: ##%;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This makes it a % of its container, not of the size of itself. – afilina Oct 21 at 12:00
-1

Actually most of the answers here doesn't really scale the image to the width of itself.

We need to have a width and height of auto on the img element itself so we can start with it's original size.

After that a container element can scale the image for us.

Simple HTML example:

<div style="position: relative;">
    <figure>
       <img src="your-image@2x.png" />
    </figure>
</div>

And here are the CSS rules. I use an absolute container in this case:

figure {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    -webkit-transform: scale(0.5); 
    -moz-transform: scale(0.5);
    -ms-transform: scale(0.5); 
    -o-transform: scale(0.5);
    transform: scale(0.5);
    transform-origin: left;
} 

figure img {
    width: auto;
    height: auto;
}

You could tweak the image positioning with rules like transform: translate(0%, -50%);.

| improve this answer | |
  • position: absolute would break any layout, so it's not a viable solution – afilina Oct 19 at 16:08
  • I updated the answer. It needs to be in a container that has a relative position, then it should work. Nothing breaks with position absolute. It's just another way of positioning elements. – Floris Oct 20 at 14:28
  • It does break the layout by taking the target element out of the normal flow. Plus, the image is still taking up the space of the original, despite the content being resized. See example: jsfiddle.net/afilina/o1j6s8L5 – afilina Oct 21 at 12:14
  • Good thing you aren't stubborn. Anyway, I've got a working example in production here, check out the client logos of this website: ditisdeessentie.nl - so this can be done. – Floris Oct 22 at 10:20
  • I put your answer in a JSFiddle and the layout is broken. If there is anything that can be done to fix it, then it should be part of the above answer. The answer is incomplete in its current form. – afilina Oct 22 at 15:45
-2

I think you are right, it's just not possible with pure CSS as far as I know (not cross-browser I mean).

Edit:

Ok I didn't like my answer very much so I puzzled a little. I might have found an interesting idea which could help out.. maybe it IS possible after all (although not the prettiest thing ever):

Edit: Tested and working in Chrome, FF and IE 8&9. . It doesn't work in IE7.

jsFiddle example here

html:

<div id="img_wrap">
    <img id="original_img" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/81/Mdna-standard-edition-cover.jpg"/>
    <div id="rescaled_img_wrap">
        <img id="rescaled_img" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/81/Mdna-standard-edition-cover.jpg"/>
    </div>
</div>

css:

#img_wrap {
    display: inline-block;       
    position:relative;    
}

#rescaled_img_wrap {
    width: 50%;
}
#original_img {
    display: none;
}
#rescaled_img {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    your example resize image not proportionally – Vladimir Starkov May 25 '12 at 10:30
  • 1
    Your method makes it possible to decrease image through window resizing – Vladimir Starkov May 25 '12 at 11:06
  • it is because you are using inline-block, that's why width #img_wrap depends not only inner html width, but also on context-container width. – Vladimir Starkov May 25 '12 at 11:18
  • As far as I can tell, that display:none image does nothing and can be removed. Or am I missing something? – tremby Feb 6 '14 at 22:10

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