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I'm creating a database table and I don't have a logical primary key assigned to it. So, I'm thinking about leaving it without a primary key, but I'm feeling a bit guilty about it. Should I?

Should each and every table have a primary key?

  • 5
    Could you give some more details about the table? The answer is probably "yes" though. – Ryan Bair May 8 '09 at 14:53
  • 7
    Yes, each and every table should have primary key. – Syed Tayyab Ali May 8 '09 at 14:54

14 Answers 14

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Short answer: yes.

Long answer:

  • You need your table to be joinable on something
  • If you want your table to be clustered, you need some kind of a primary key.
  • If your table design does not need a primary key, rethink your design: most probably, you are missing something. Why keep identical records?

In MySQL, the InnoDB storage engine always creates a primary key if you didn't specify it explicitly, thus making an extra column you don't have access to.

Note that a primary key can be composite.

If you have a many-to-many link table, you create the primary key on all fields involved in the link. Thus you ensure that you don't have two or more records describing one link.

Besides the logical consistency issues, most RDBMS engines will benefit from including these fields in a unique index.

And since any primary key involves creating a unique index, you should declare it and get both logical consistency and performance.

See this article in my blog for why you should always create a unique index on unique data:

P.S. There are some very, very special cases where you don't need a primary key.

Mostly they include log tables which don't have any indexes for performance reasons.

  • they still have a primary key, the composite one – kristof May 8 '09 at 14:57
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    @annakata: they should have a composite primary key – Quassnoi May 8 '09 at 14:57
  • @Quassoni - yeah you're totally right, brainfail on my part – annakata May 8 '09 at 15:15
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    "And since any PRIMARY KEY involves creating a UNIQUE index" is not true for Oracle. One can use a non-unique index to enforce a primary key. In fact, it is sometimes REQUIRED that unique and PK constraints use non-unique indexes. – Stephanie Page May 31 '13 at 19:47
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    Just a comment on the rhetorical question "Why keep identical records?". Note that just adding a PK will not ensure that there is no duplication. Often the PK is not visible to the user, hence what is important is in the visible fields, which could contain duplicate data. Depending on your design this may be desirable or not. – Rossco Mar 18 '15 at 21:05
31

Always best to have a primary key. This way it meets first normal form and allows you to continue along the database normalization path.

As stated by others, there are some reasons not to have a primary key, but most will not be harmed if there is a primary key

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    @PaulSuart Data need not always be in their normal forms. In fact, when data gets huge, it shouldn't be kept in its normal form otherwise accessing data would be horrendously slow for queries doing table joins etc. Normal forms is an "idealization" and practically possible only when data is not expected to grow huge. – Pacerier Jun 13 '12 at 1:39
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Except for a few very rare cases (possibly a many-to-many relationship table, or a table you temporarily use for bulk-loading huge amounts of data), I would go with the saying:

If it doesn't have a primary key, it's not a table!

Marc

  • 9
    Strictly speaking that sentence is wrong. Tables can be "View Tables" created by your Query Language. A RDBMS is comprised of relations not tables. That sentence should say: "If it doesn't have a primary key, it's not a relation!". – nottinhill Mar 29 '12 at 10:17
  • Or perhaps, "if there are no candidate keys then it isn't a relational table". But see the very rare cases where it's ok to have a table that doesn't represent a relation. – Walter Mitty Feb 13 '18 at 0:34
  • Why wouldn't a many-to-many table have a primary key? You could create a separate primary key and then create a unique index for the surrogate of foreign keys. I think it's better to have a primary key on every table. Even on a bulk loading table you might want to separately identify a primary key that is not inclusive of the data being imported as it may help you identify duplicate records in an ETL process. It seems to me that every table should still have a primary key, even if it is a little more storage. A table created by a view is a subset of a table not a table itself. – John Ernest Jul 27 '18 at 19:09
  • In a many to many relationship table, you could create a composite primary key consisting of both ids to the relationships. – Jaap Oct 17 '18 at 10:45
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Pretty much any time I've created a table without a primary key, thinking I wouldn't need one, I've ended up going back and adding one. I now create even my join tables with an auto-generated identity field that I use as the primary key.

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    A join table IS a primary key - a composite one, consisting of the PK's of both records being joined. E.g. CREATE TABLE PersonOrder (PersonId int, OrderId int, PRIMARY KEY(PersonId, OrderId)). – Keith Williams May 14 '09 at 12:35
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    Yes, but what if the Link Table has also a third attribute, lets say "OrderDate". Would you add that to the composite key as well? IMHO no - because it is further reducable and does not serve the not-reducable characterstic a primary key should have. – nottinhill Mar 29 '12 at 10:14
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Just add it, you will be sorry later when you didn't (selecting, deleting. linking, etc)

7

Will you ever need to join this table to other tables? Do you need a way to uniquely identify a record? If the answer is yes, you need a primary key. Assume your data is something like a customer table that has the names of the people who are customers. There may be no natural key because you need the addresses, emails, phone numbers, etc. to determine if this Sally Smith is different from that Sally Smith and you will be storing that information in related tables as the person can have mulitple phones, addesses, emails, etc. Suppose Sally Smith marries John Jones and becomes Sally Jones. If you don't have an artifical key onthe table, when you update the name, you just changed 7 Sally Smiths to Sally Jones even though only one of them got married and changed her name. And of course in this case withouth an artificial key how do you know which Sally Smith lives in Chicago and which one lives in LA?

You say you have no natural key, therefore you don't have any combinations of field to make unique either, this makes the artficial key critical.

I have found anytime I don't have a natural key, an artifical key is an absolute must for maintaining data integrity. If you do have a natural key, you can use that as the key field instead. But personally unless the natural key is one field, I still prefer an artifical key and unique index on the natural key. You will regret it later if you don't put one in.

6

It is a good practice to have a PK on every table, but it's not a MUST. Most probably you will need a unique index, and/or a clustered index (which is PK or not) depending on your need.

Check out the Primary Keys and Clustered Indexes sections on Books Online (for SQL Server)

"PRIMARY KEY constraints identify the column or set of columns that have values that uniquely identify a row in a table. No two rows in a table can have the same primary key value. You cannot enter NULL for any column in a primary key. We recommend using a small, integer column as a primary key. Each table should have a primary key. A column or combination of columns that qualify as a primary key value is referred to as a candidate key."

But then check this out also: http://www.aisintl.com/case/primary_and_foreign_key.html

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    Check this also, sql-server-performance.com/2006/primary-key-index-clustered – endo64 Feb 9 '12 at 11:47
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    that page is quite stupid. First, a primary key is needed for performance reasons. By reading his page I learn that adding an ID to a book table is useless because the book's text is unique; obviously, the guy never worked with databases.But he also has problems in understanding what he criticizes. Page written that 1) a PK value references a row 2) you can join 2 tables by any set of columns. There is no contraddiction. It is amazing that an academic article author doesn't understand the very basic of relational theory. – Federico Razzoli Oct 11 '15 at 10:23
  • "First, a primary key is needed for performance reasons" this is incorrect, PK doesn't direct affect on performance. Not having a PK may lead many problems (identifying a row, joining etc.) but performance is not one of them. When you create PK on a table SQL server creates a unique-clustered index, that index affects the performance not the PK itself. As a real example, my table has a clustered index on date column and a PK on a GUID field, because my rows should be physically ordered over date column in the table since all queries have a date range (in my case). – endo64 Oct 27 '16 at 8:19
  • That clustered index is a flavor of the primary key, created by SQL Server and several other DBMS's. Are you sure that it is a good idea to use it? For example, in MySQL, it isn't for several undocumented reasons. – Federico Razzoli Mar 7 '17 at 13:09
  • @FedericoRazzoli Clustered index is, roughly, an index that the data stored physically. So it directly affects performance choosing the most suitable column or columns together as clustered index. Usually programmers, pust an auto-inc ID as PK, to make CRUD easily, that ID becomes clustered index automatically, but it doesn't have to be. In my case the data was predefined, no chance to change it, so I created a PK on a GUID column and clustered index on date column and it gives me a good performance improvement. See the dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/innodb-index-types.html – endo64 Mar 8 '17 at 7:51
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I know that in order to use certain features of the gridview in .NET, you need a primary key in order for the gridview to know which row needs updating/deleting. General practice should be to have a primary key or primary key cluster. I personally prefer the former.

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To make it future proof you really should. If you want to replicate it you'll need one. If you want to join it to another table your life (and that of the poor fools who have to maintain it next year) will be so much easier.

  • I'm not convinced that it's necessary yet, but "do it because otherwise somebody is going to have to deal with the consequences later" is enough to make me err on the side of doing it. I can always just drop the column later if it seems worthwhile to try shrinking it down... – ArtOfWarfare Jun 10 at 3:13
2

I always have a primary key, even if in the beginning I don't have a purpose in mind yet for it. There have been a few times when I eventually need a PK in a table that doesn't have one and it's always more trouble to put it in later. I think there is more of an upside to always including one.

1

In short, no. However, you need to keep in mind that certain client access CRUD operations require it. For future proofing, I tend to always utilize primary keys.

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If you are using Hibernate its not possible to create an Entity without a primary key. This issues can create problem if you are working with an existing database which was created with plain sql/ddl scripts, and no primary key was added

1

I am in the role of maintaining application created by offshore development team. Now I am having all kinds of issues in the application because original database schema did not contain PRIMARY KEYS on some tables. So please dont let other people suffer because of your poor design. It is always good idea to have primary keys on tables.

0

Disagree with the suggested answer. The short answer is: NO.

The purpose of the primary key is to uniquely identify a row on the table in order to form a relationship with another table. Traditionally, an auto-incremented integer value is used for this purpose, but there are variations to this.

There are cases though, for example logging time-series data, where the existence of a such key is simply not needed and just takes up memory. Making a row unique is simply ...not required!

A small example: Table A: LogData

Columns:  DateAndTime, UserId, AttribA, AttribB, AttribC etc...

No Primary Key needed.

Table B: User

Columns: Id, FirstName, LastName etc. 

Primary Key (Id) needed in order to be used as a "foreign key" to LogData table.

protected by Community Jan 11 at 8:55

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