11

I am parsing XML (LINQ to XML) and I am using a nullable type (int? and decimal?) in cases where the element / attribute is empty. However, when building my collection to pass to the DB (Using TVP) I don't know how to handle the cases where the value is actually null. I can't pass a null into the SqlDataRecord SetInt32 or SetDecimal and I don't want to set to zero....I actually want it to be null.

Telling me no overload for int?

Count below is a nullable type (int? Count)

SqlDataRecord rec = new SqlDataRecord(
              new SqlMetaData("Name", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50),
              new SqlMetaData("Type", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50),
              new SqlMetaData("Count", SqlDbType.Int));

   rec.SetString(0, dm.Name);
   rec.SetString(1, dm.Type);
   rec.SetString(2, dm.Count);

Any ideas how to handle this without passing zero (maintaining the null)?

18

Extension method:

static class SqlDataRecordExtensions
{
    static void SetNullableInt32(this SqlDataRecord rec, int index, Int32? value)
    {
        if (value.HasValue)
            rec.SetInt32(index, value.GetValueOrDefault());
        else
            rec.SetDBNull(index);
    }
}

or, to use SetSqlInt32 as suggested by D Stanley:

static class SqlDataRecordExtensions
{
    static void SetNullableInt32(this SqlDataRecord rec, int index, Int32? value)
    {
        rec.SetSqlInt32(index, value.HasValue ? value.GetValueOrDefault() : SqlInt32.Null);
        //                                      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        //                                      You can leave out the cast to (SqlInt32),
        //                                      because the conversion is implicit
    }
}

Note, 9 Dec 2013: Returning to this answer because of a comment, I noticed a small opportunity for improvement, based on Eric Lippert's series on nullable micro-optimizations, which can be found at http://ericlippert.com/2012/12/20/nullable-micro-optimizations-part-one/.

In brief, while the Value property requires less typing and is therefore arguably more optimal for the programmer, it has to throw an exception if HasValue is false. On the other hand, the GetValueOrDefault() method is a simple field access. Because of this, GetValueOrDefault() requires fewer instructions and is more likely to be inlined, so it is more optimal for the compiler and the processor.

7
  • SetValue(ordinal,object) handles nullables and null values with a little bit of overhead for type and value length checking. The performance difference may not be noticeable. Nov 1 '13 at 12:39
  • @RichardCollette Thanks for the comment; I didn't think of that. I suspect you're right that the performance difference is probably insignificant for most applications. I do tend to prefer stronger typing on philosophical grounds, though. Your comment also inspires me to add a small optimization I didn't think of two years ago.
    – phoog
    Dec 9 '13 at 21:31
  • Not sure if the framework has changed but it's SetDBNull in version 4 (note the 'B' case). Nov 18 '14 at 10:52
  • 1
    @PhilCooper What is SetDBNull in version 4? What 'B' case?
    – phoog
    Feb 17 '15 at 7:28
  • @phoog SetDbNull is SetDBNull see here: SqlDataRecord.SetDBNull Feb 17 '15 at 8:43
4

I've never worked with SqlDataRecord, but when using DataTable and DataRow, or when using parameterized queries, I specify null using DBNull.Value.

With SqlDataRecord, it looks like you can use the SetDBNull method.

1

As @phoog recommended, extension methods for different types:

public static class ExtensionSqlDataRecord
{
    public static void SetDateTime(this SqlDataRecord record, int ordinal, DateTime? value)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            record.SetDateTime(ordinal, (DateTime)value);
        }
        else
        {
            record.SetDBNull(ordinal);
        }
    }

    public static void SetInt32(this SqlDataRecord record, int ordinal, int? value)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            record.SetInt32(ordinal, (int)value);
        }
        else
        {
            record.SetDBNull(ordinal);
        }
    }

    public static void SetByte(this SqlDataRecord record, int ordinal, byte? value)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            record.SetByte(ordinal, (byte)value);
        }
        else
        {
            record.SetDBNull(ordinal);
        }
    }

    public static void SetDecimal(this SqlDataRecord record, int ordinal, decimal? value)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            record.SetDecimal(ordinal, (decimal)value);
        }
        else
        {
            record.SetDBNull(ordinal);
        }
    }

    public static void SetBoolean(this SqlDataRecord record, int ordinal, bool? value)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            record.SetBoolean(ordinal, (bool)value);
        }
        else
        {
            record.SetDBNull(ordinal);
        }
    }
}
0

Should use SetSqlInt32 instead of SetString. Try

rec.SetSqlInt32(2, (dm.Count.HasValue ? new SqlInt32(dm.Count) : SqlInt32.Null) );
2
  • That would have to be rec.SetSqlInt32(2, (dm.Count.HasValue ? new SqlInt32(dm.Count.Value) : SqlInt32.Null) );
    – phoog
    Dec 6 '11 at 19:21
  • Further, as I realized when editing my answer, the implicit conversion from int to SqlInt32 means you can do this: rec.SetSqlInt32(2, dm.Count.HasValue ? dm.Count.Value : SqlInt32.Null);
    – phoog
    Dec 6 '11 at 19:30
0

//Ive found this to work the best for me when checking or dealing with nullable types //in my example I am checking values stored in a String[] array

sqlcmdUpdateRecord.Parameters.AddWithValue("@strSomeValue", (strRecord[(int) 
DataFields.SomeDataField] as object) ?? DBNull.Value);
0

maybe you can try the below.

if(dm.Count == null){
  rec.SetDBNull(2)
}
else{
 rec.SetString(2, dm.Count);
}

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