5

I want to use List.BinarySearch() with a custom item type. The custom type does not implement IComparable<T>; instead I have several static Comparison<T> functions that I call because at various points I want to sort the list on different criteria. Plus I think it adds clarity since the way you are sorting can be described by the function name. Now I want to do a binary search on the list. I wanted to use one of my comparison functions, only to find that List.BinarySearch() doesn't have an overload that accepts Comparison<T>, only IComparer<T>. I try to avoid IComparer<T> because it seems silly to me to have a separate class just for comparing objects. Why doesn't List.BinarySearch() have overloads that take Comparison<T> in addition to IComparer<T>? And is there any way to use my existing Comparison<T> functions in List.BinarySearch()?

  • where is the code that you are using to do the search a foreach or for loop..?? – MethodMan Dec 6 '11 at 19:48
  • 1
    Create a comparer that delegates to your comparison. Good to go. – Anthony Pegram Dec 6 '11 at 19:48
  • Can anybody answer my first question: why doesn't List.BinarySearch() have overloads that take Comparison<T> in addition to just IComparer<T>? Just out of curiosity... – Craig W Dec 6 '11 at 19:55
  • 1
    It's an omission, we should report the bug to Microsoft. – Colonel Panic Jul 30 '15 at 11:05
  • 1
    Please vote for the bug report at github.com/dotnet/coreclr/issues/2188 – Colonel Panic Feb 16 '16 at 12:03
11

It's very easy to create an IComparer<T> from a Comparison<T> - here's a (slightly amended) class from MiscUtil which you're welcome to use:

/// <summary>
/// Utility to build an IComparer implementation from a Comparison delegate,
/// and a static method to do the reverse.
/// </summary>
public class ComparisonComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Comparison<T> comparison;

    public ComparisonComparer(Comparison<T> comparison)
    {
        if (comparison == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("comparison");
        }
        this.comparison = comparison;
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return comparison(x, y);
    }
}

You could also add an extension method to List<T> to do this for you:

public static int BinarySearch<T>(this List<T> list, Comparison<T> comparison)
{
    return list.BinarySearch(new ComparisonComparer(comparison));
}
  • 1
    I guess this is the best solution, although I'm not overly fond of it. I am still very curious about why the overloads don't exist to use Comparison<T> directly. – Craig W Dec 7 '11 at 0:15
  • 1
    @Craig: As ever, there's a cost to introducing anything. I suspect that the BCL maintainers feel it doesn't quite make the bar of utility against cost. – Jon Skeet Dec 7 '11 at 5:08
  • @JonSkeet: I don't see why that would be, since there's an equivalent overload for .Sort() that does use Comparison<T>. I think they just overlooked it. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 25 '13 at 21:25
  • @BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft: It may well not have been the same person making the decision for both methods, of course. – Jon Skeet Jul 25 '13 at 21:27
1

Create wrapper for Comparison such as this one:

public class ComparisonWrapper<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    private Comparison<T> comparison;
    public ComparisonWrapper(Comparison<T> comparison)
    {
        this.comparison = comparison;
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return comparison(x, y);
    }
}
0

Here's an extension on Jon's answer that takes a lambda expression.

public static class ListExtensions
{
    public static int BinarySearch<T>(this List<T> list, T item, Func<T, T, int> compare)
    {
        return list.BinarySearch(item, new ComparisonComparer<T>(compare));
    }
}

public class ComparisonComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Comparison<T> comparison;

    public ComparisonComparer(Func<T, T, int> compare)
    {
        if (compare == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("comparison");
        }
        comparison = new Comparison<T>(compare);
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return comparison(x, y);
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.