382

I need to check a JavaScript array to see if there are any duplicate values. What's the easiest way to do this? I just need to find what the duplicated values are - I don't actually need their indexes or how many times they are duplicated.

I know I can loop through the array and check all the other values for a match, but it seems like there should be an easier way. Any ideas? Thanks!

Similar question:

  • 17
    There seems to be years of confusion about what this question asks. I needed to know what elements in the array were duplicated: "I just need to find what the duplicated values are". The correct answer should NOT remove duplicates from the array. That's the inverse of what I wanted: a list of the duplicates, not a list of unique elements. – Scott Saunders Feb 22 '13 at 15:47

75 Answers 75

271

You could sort the array and then run through it and then see if the next (or previous) index is the same as the current. Assuming your sort algorithm is good, this should be less than O(n2):

var arr = [9, 9, 111, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 7];
var sorted_arr = arr.slice().sort(); // You can define the comparing function here. 
                                     // JS by default uses a crappy string compare.
                                     // (we use slice to clone the array so the
                                     // original array won't be modified)
var results = [];
for (var i = 0; i < sorted_arr.length - 1; i++) {
    if (sorted_arr[i + 1] == sorted_arr[i]) {
        results.push(sorted_arr[i]);
    }
}

console.log(results);

In case, if you are to return as a function for duplicates. This is for similar type of case.

Reference: https://stackoverflow.com/a/57532964/8119511

  • 9
    "Assuming your sort algorithm is good, this should be less than O^2". Specifically, it could be O(n*log(n)). – ESRogs May 8 '09 at 17:20
  • 73
    This script doesn't work so well with more than 2 duplicates (e.g. arr = [9, 9, 9, 111, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 7]; – Mottie Oct 23 '10 at 15:00
  • 7
    @swilliams I don't think those guidelines say anything about not using i++. Instead, they say not to write j = i + +j. Two different things IMHO. I think i += 1 is more confusing than the simple and beautiful i++ :) – Danilo Bargen Dec 23 '10 at 14:31
  • 31
    -1 This answer is wrong on many levels. First of all var sorted_arr = arr.sort() is useless: arr.sort() mutates the original array (which is a problem in its own right). This also discards an element. (Run the code above. What happens to 9?) cc @dystroy A cleaner solution would be results = arr.filter(function(elem, pos) { return arr.indexOf(elem) == pos; }) – NullUserException Jan 13 '13 at 21:10
  • 21
    Everyone: the question asks to display the duplicate values, not to remove them. Please don't edit/break the code to try to make it do something it's not trying to do. The alert should show the values that are duplicated. – Scott Saunders Feb 22 '13 at 15:50
204

If you want to elimate the duplicates, try this great solution:

function eliminateDuplicates(arr) {
  var i,
      len = arr.length,
      out = [],
      obj = {};

  for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    obj[arr[i]] = 0;
  }
  for (i in obj) {
    out.push(i);
  }
  return out;
}

Source: http://dreaminginjavascript.wordpress.com/2008/08/22/eliminating-duplicates/

  • 16
    That is good code, but unfortunately it doesn't do what I'm asking for. – Scott Saunders May 8 '09 at 17:59
  • 65
    The code above (which is mine--that's my blog) gets you pretty close. A small tweak and you're there. First of all, you can see if arr.length and out.length are the same. If they are the same, there are no duplicated elements. But you want a little more. If you want to "catch" the dupes as they happen, check to see if the length of the array increases after the obj[arr[i]]=0 line. Nifty, eh? :-) Thanks for the nice words, Raphael Montanaro. – Nosredna May 8 '09 at 22:25
  • 6
    @MarcoDemaio: Uh, no, why would the code not work with spaces? You can put whatever you like in a property name - just can't use the dot syntax to access ones with spaces (nor props with various other characters which would break parsing). – Gijs Oct 11 '11 at 10:29
  • 4
    @Gijs: +1 you are right. I didn't know it. But it still does not work when it's an array of objects. – Marco Demaio Oct 16 '11 at 12:19
  • 3
    This algorithm also has the side effect of returning a sorted array, which might not be what you want. – asymmetric Jun 3 '12 at 19:26
154

This is my answer from the duplicate thread (!):

When writing this entry 2014 - all examples were for-loops or jQuery. Javascript has the perfect tools for this: sort, map and reduce.

Find duplicate items

var names = ['Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Nancy', 'Carl']

var uniq = names
  .map((name) => {
    return {
      count: 1,
      name: name
    }
  })
  .reduce((a, b) => {
    a[b.name] = (a[b.name] || 0) + b.count
    return a
  }, {})

var duplicates = Object.keys(uniq).filter((a) => uniq[a] > 1)

console.log(duplicates) // [ 'Nancy' ]

More functional syntax:

@Dmytro-Laptin pointed out some code code be removed. This is a more compact version of the same code. Using some ES6 tricks and higher order functions:

const names = ['Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Nancy', 'Carl']

const count = names =>
  names.reduce((a, b) => ({ ...a,
    [b]: (a[b] || 0) + 1
  }), {}) // don't forget to initialize the accumulator

const duplicates = dict =>
  Object.keys(dict).filter((a) => dict[a] > 1)

console.log(count(names)) // { Mike: 1, Matt: 1, Nancy: 2, Adam: 1, Jenny: 1, Carl: 1 }
console.log(duplicates(count(names))) // [ 'Nancy' ]

  • 1
    This is the kind of solution I've been looking for. If I wanted to have a dozen for-loops, that's be pretty easy to write. The key word in the OP was "efficient". – Josh Jul 22 '16 at 17:18
  • @ChristianLandgren, where is 'dict' variable declared? maybe 'count' should be used instead? – Dmytro Laptin Aug 18 '16 at 14:30
  • 3
    Please keep your misleading opinion for yourself (-1 for being arrogant). I'm personally tired of people confusing "short" and "efficient", and posting one-liners without questioning performances. Short programs and modern JS are NOT better by nature. Typical misuse of the word "efficient" here. Typical naive belief here (read following comments). Demo here. – leaf Mar 9 at 9:03
  • 1
    @leaf - please keep your suggestions to your own answers. The solution you edited is not readable, it might be performant (probably not) but even so - readability often is more important than performance in my opinion. But most importantly - don't remove someone else's code to replace it with yours without reason. – Christian Landgren Mar 10 at 21:42
  • 1
    Different answers, yes, different opinions, I don't think so. – leaf Mar 11 at 12:29
49

Find duplicate values in an array

This should be one of the shortest ways to actually find duplicate values in an array. As specifically asked for by the OP, this does not remove duplicates but finds them.

var input = [1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 1];

var duplicates = input.reduce(function(acc, el, i, arr) {
  if (arr.indexOf(el) !== i && acc.indexOf(el) < 0) acc.push(el); return acc;
}, []);

document.write(duplicates); // = 1,3 (actual array == [1, 3])

This doesn't need sorting or any third party framework. It also doesn't need manual loops. It works with every value indexOf() (or to be clearer: the strict comparision operator) supports.

Because of reduce() and indexOf() it needs at least IE 9.

  • 4
    ES6 arrow/simple/pure version: const dupes = items.reduce((acc, v, i, arr) => arr.indexOf(v) !== i && acc.indexOf(v) === -1 ? acc.concat(v) : acc, []) – ZephDavies Nov 29 '18 at 14:56
29

You can add this function, or tweak it and add it to Javascript's Array prototype:

Array.prototype.unique = function () {
    var r = new Array();
    o:for(var i = 0, n = this.length; i < n; i++)
    {
        for(var x = 0, y = r.length; x < y; x++)
        {
            if(r[x]==this[i])
            {
                alert('this is a DUPE!');
                continue o;
            }
        }
        r[r.length] = this[i];
    }
    return r;
}

var arr = [1,2,2,3,3,4,5,6,2,3,7,8,5,9];
var unique = arr.unique();
alert(unique);
  • This is the best solution, but be careful of adding it to the array prototype, since that will mess up IE if looping through the values. – Sampsa Suoninen Oct 12 '12 at 6:59
  • @RoyTinker perl supports them too, but I had no idea javascript did – Luke H Nov 14 '12 at 17:13
  • 1
    Does not do what the OP asked for, return the duplicates. – RWC Aug 18 '17 at 12:10
27

UPDATED: The following uses an optimized combined strategy. It optimizes primitive lookups to benefit from hash O(1) lookup time (running unique on an array of primitives is O(n)). Object lookups are optimized by tagging objects with a unique id while iterating through so so identifying duplicate objects is also O(1) per item and O(n) for the whole list. The only exception is items that are frozen, but those are rare and a fallback is provided using an array and indexOf.

var unique = function(){
  var hasOwn = {}.hasOwnProperty,
      toString = {}.toString,
      uids = {};

  function uid(){
    var key = Math.random().toString(36).slice(2);
    return key in uids ? uid() : uids[key] = key;
  }

  function unique(array){
    var strings = {}, numbers = {}, others = {},
        tagged = [], failed = [],
        count = 0, i = array.length,
        item, type;

    var id = uid();

    while (i--) {
      item = array[i];
      type = typeof item;
      if (item == null || type !== 'object' && type !== 'function') {
        // primitive
        switch (type) {
          case 'string': strings[item] = true; break;
          case 'number': numbers[item] = true; break;
          default: others[item] = item; break;
        }
      } else {
        // object
        if (!hasOwn.call(item, id)) {
          try {
            item[id] = true;
            tagged[count++] = item;
          } catch (e){
            if (failed.indexOf(item) === -1)
              failed[failed.length] = item;
          }
        }
      }
    }

    // remove the tags
    while (count--)
      delete tagged[count][id];

    tagged = tagged.concat(failed);
    count = tagged.length;

    // append primitives to results
    for (i in strings)
      if (hasOwn.call(strings, i))
        tagged[count++] = i;

    for (i in numbers)
      if (hasOwn.call(numbers, i))
        tagged[count++] = +i;

    for (i in others)
      if (hasOwn.call(others, i))
        tagged[count++] = others[i];

    return tagged;
  }

  return unique;
}();

If you have ES6 Collections available, then there is a much simpler and significantly faster version. (shim for IE9+ and other browsers here: https://github.com/Benvie/ES6-Harmony-Collections-Shim)

function unique(array){
  var seen = new Set;
  return array.filter(function(item){
    if (!seen.has(item)) {
      seen.add(item);
      return true;
    }
  });
}
  • really? why answer a question which has been solved over 2 years ago? – Rene Pot Oct 28 '11 at 11:16
  • 3
    I was answering another question and apparently accidentally clicked on someone linking to this one, calling it a duplicate, and ended up cloning my answer and confusing the hell out of myself. I edit my stuff a lot. – user748221 Oct 28 '11 at 11:19
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/7683845/… – user748221 Oct 28 '11 at 11:19
  • 16
    I think it's nice with different solutions. It doesn't matter that the topic is old and solved since it's still possible to come up with different ways of doing this. It's a typical problem in computer science. – Emil Vikström Nov 30 '11 at 12:53
  • 1
    now ES3 friendly and better – user748221 Jun 12 '12 at 18:13
17
var a = ["a","a","b","c","c"];

a.filter(function(value,index,self){ return (self.indexOf(value) !== index )})
  • This seems to work, but you should probably include some text describing how it works. – The DIMM Reaper Aug 20 '15 at 15:27
  • 1
    Won't work if there are more 2 occurrences of a duplicate value. – vasa Nov 3 '15 at 0:37
  • 1
    This is elegant and simple. I love it. For those wanting to figure out how they work, I've created a gist showing how to show duplicates and eliminate duplicates. See here: gist.github.com/jbcoder/f1c616a32ee4d642691792eebdc4257b – Josh Jul 22 '16 at 17:40
  • @TheDIMMReaper for the second 'a' in array, inside filter function the index == 1, whereas self.indexOf('a') == 0 – mario1ua Nov 16 '18 at 13:40
17

This should get you what you want, Just the duplicates.

function find_duplicates(arr) {
  var len=arr.length,
      out=[],
      counts={};

  for (var i=0;i<len;i++) {
    var item = arr[i];
    counts[item] = counts[item] >= 1 ? counts[item] + 1 : 1;
    if (counts[item] === 2) {
      out.push(item);
    }
  }

  return out;
}

find_duplicates(['one',2,3,4,4,4,5,6,7,7,7,'pig','one']); // -> ['one',4,7] in no particular order.
  • I verified this BTW and it works. – Daniel Beardsley May 9 '09 at 0:03
  • 3
    var count is not used.. – vsync Nov 1 '09 at 14:10
13

using underscore.js

function hasDuplicate(arr){
    return (arr.length != _.uniq(arr).length);
}
12

UPDATED: Short one-liner to get the duplicates:

[1, 2, 2, 4, 3, 4].filter((e, i, a) => a.indexOf(e) !== i) // [2, 4]

To get the array without duplicates simply invert the condition:

[1, 2, 2, 4, 3, 4].filter((e, i, a) => a.indexOf(e) === i) // [1, 2, 3, 4]

I simply did not think about filter() in my old answer below ;)


When all you need is to check that there are no duplicates as asked in this question you can use the every() method:

[1, 2, 3].every((e, i, a) => a.indexOf(e) === i) // true

[1, 2, 1].every((e, i, a) => a.indexOf(e) === i) // false

Note that every() doesn't work for IE 8 and below.

  • 1
    Does not do what the OP asked for, return the duplicates. – RWC Aug 18 '17 at 12:18
  • True, I updated my answer to fix that. – Laurent Payot Jul 26 at 15:49
  • Royal solution ! thnaks – Jeremy Piednoel Aug 9 at 10:58
6
var a = [324,3,32,5,52,2100,1,20,2,3,3,2,2,2,1,1,1].sort();
a.filter(function(v,i,o){return i&&v!==o[i-1]?v:0;});

or when added to the prototyp.chain of Array

//copy and paste: without error handling
Array.prototype.unique = 
   function(){return this.sort().filter(function(v,i,o){return i&&v!==o[i-1]?v:0;});}

See here: https://gist.github.com/1305056

  • 1
    The filter function should return true or false, not the element itself. Filtering an array containing 0's would not have returned them. – mflodin Jan 9 '12 at 23:43
  • Also, I assume the i&& is for avoiding going out of bounds of the array, but it also means that the first element in the sorted array will not be included. In your example there is no 1 in the resulting array. I.e. return i&&v!==o[i-1]?v:0; should be return v!==o[i-1]; – mflodin Jan 10 '12 at 0:48
6

Find unique values from 3 arrays (or more):

Array.prototype.unique = function () {
    var arr = this.sort(), i; // input must be sorted for this to work
    for( i=arr.length; i--; )
      arr[i] === arr[i-1] && arr.splice(i,1); // remove duplicate item

    return arr;
}

var arr =  [1,2,2,3,3,4,5,6,2,3,7,8,5,9],
    arr2 = [1,2,511,12,50],
    arr3 = [22],
    unique = arr.concat(arr2, arr3).unique();

console.log(unique);  // [22, 50, 12, 511, 2, 1, 9, 5, 8, 7, 3, 6, 4]

Just a polyfill for array indexOf for old browsers:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf){
   Array.prototype.indexOf = function(elt /*, from*/){
     var len = this.length >>> 0;

     var from = Number(arguments[1]) || 0;
     from = (from < 0) ? Math.ceil(from) : Math.floor(from);
     if (from < 0)
        from += len;

     for (; from < len; from++){
        if (from in this && this[from] === elt)
           return from;
     }
     return -1;
  };
}

jQuery solution using "inArray":

if( $.inArray(this[i], arr) == -1 )

ES2015

var arr =  [1,2,2,3,3,4,5,6,2,3,7,8,5,22],
    arr2 = [1,2,511,12,50],
    arr3 = [22],
    unique;

// Combine all the arrays to a single one
unique = arr.concat(arr2, arr3);
// create a new (dirty) Array with only the unique items
unique = unique.map((item,i) => unique.includes(item, i+1) ? item : '' )
// Cleanup - remove duplicate & empty items items 
unique = [...new Set(unique)].filter(n => n);

console.log(unique);

instead of adding the 'Array.prototype.indexOf'

  • +1 because it's definitely more readable the code using Array.indexOf, but unfortunately it seems slower than using a simple nested loop. Even on browsers that implements Array.indexOf nayively like FF. Plz, Have a look at these tests I did here: jsperf.com/array-unique2 and let me know your thoughts. – Marco Demaio Mar 4 '11 at 16:41
  • What is r here? – Shekhar K. Sharma Feb 20 '14 at 14:06
  • @shekhardesigner - updated answer. "r" is the array you search in – vsync Feb 20 '14 at 14:40
  • @vsync I had to initialize, var r = []; to get your code working. And worked like charm. – Shekhar K. Sharma Feb 21 '14 at 12:06
  • 2
    Does not do what the OP asked for, return the duplicates. – RWC Aug 18 '17 at 12:16
6

Here is mine simple and one line solution.

It searches not unique elements first, then makes found array unique with the use of Set.

So we have array of duplicates in the end.

var array = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3, 7, 8, 5, 22, 1, 2, 511, 12, 50, 22];

console.log([...new Set(
  array.filter((value, index, self) => self.indexOf(value) !== index))]
);

5

Fast and elegant way using es6 object destructuring and reduce

It runs in O(n) (1 iteration over the array) and doesn't repeat values that appear more than 2 times

const arr = ['hi', 'hi', 'hi', 'bye', 'bye', 'asd']
const {
  dup
} = arr.reduce(
  (acc, curr) => {
    acc.items[curr] = acc.items[curr] ? acc.items[curr] += 1 : 1
    if (acc.items[curr] === 2) acc.dup.push(curr)
    return acc
  }, {
    items: {},
    dup: []
  },
)

console.log(dup)
// ['hi', 'bye']

5

This is my proposal (ES6):

let a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 2, 4, 1, 5, 6]
let b = [...new Set(a.sort().filter((o, i) => o !== undefined && a[i + 1] !== undefined && o === a[i + 1]))]

// b is now [1, 2, 4]
  • 1
    This will report that a single occurrence of undefined is a duplicate. – Dem Pilafian Dec 2 '18 at 7:49
  • thank you, updated the code. – lukaszkups Dec 4 '18 at 13:32
4

Here is a very light and easy way:

var codes = dc_1.split(',');
var i = codes.length;
while (i--) {
  if (codes.indexOf(codes[i]) != i) {
    codes.splice(i,1);
  }
}
  • Best answer. And if user want duplicate elements array , for this i updated @brandon code var i = codes .length; var duplicate = []; while (i--) { if (codes .indexOf(codes [i]) != i) { if(duplicate.indexOf(codes [i]) === -1){ duplicate.push(arr[i]); } codes.splice(i,1); } } – Himanshu Shekhar Aug 18 at 7:18
4

With ES6 (or using Babel or Typescipt) you can simply do:

var duplicates = myArray.filter(i => myArray.filter(ii => ii === i).length > 1);

https://es6console.com/j58euhbt/

  • I came to the same syntax, independently, and was just about to add it as a solution when I found this one. It probably isn't the most economical, but it is simple. – nize May 7 '18 at 8:50
4

Simple code with ES6 syntax (return sorted array of duplicates):

let duplicates = a => {d=[]; a.sort((a,b) => a-b).reduce((a,b)=>{a==b&&!d.includes(a)&&d.push(a); return b}); return d};

How to use:

duplicates([1,2,3,10,10,2,3,3,10]);
  • .filter() would be much simpler – tocqueville May 7 '18 at 13:08
3

The following function (a variation of the eliminateDuplicates function already mentioned) seems to do the trick, returning test2,1,7,5 for the input ["test", "test2", "test2", 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7, 10, 22, 43, 1, 5, 8]

Note that the problem is stranger in JavaScript than in most other languages, because a JavaScript array can hold just about anything. Note that solutions that use sorting might need to provide an appropriate sorting function--I haven't tried that route yet.

This particular implementation works for (at least) strings and numbers.

function findDuplicates(arr) {
    var i,
        len=arr.length,
        out=[],
        obj={};

    for (i=0;i<len;i++) {
        if (obj[arr[i]] != null) {
            if (!obj[arr[i]]) {
                out.push(arr[i]);
                obj[arr[i]] = 1;
            }
        } else {
            obj[arr[i]] = 0;            
        }
    }
    return out;
}
3

ES5 only (i.e., it needs a filter() polyfill for IE8 and below):

var arrayToFilter = [ 4, 5, 5, 5, 2, 1, 3, 1, 1, 2, 1, 3 ];

arrayToFilter.
    sort().
    filter( function(me,i,arr){
       return (i===0) || ( me !== arr[i-1] );
    });
  • I like this simple solution. If you want the duplicates, though, you need to first find those duplicates, and then make the duplicate list unique. [ 0, 4, 5, 5, 5, 2, 1, 3, 1, 1, 2, 1, 3 ].sort().filter( function(me,i,arr){ return (i!==0) && ( me == arr[i-1] ); }).filter( function(me,i,arr){ return (i===0) || ( me !== arr[i-1] ); }); – Greg Jul 24 at 18:37
3

var arr = [2, 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 2, 5];

function returnDuplicates(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function(dupes, val, i) {
    if (arr.indexOf(val) !== i && dupes.indexOf(val) === -1) {
      dupes.push(val);
    }
    return dupes;
  }, []);
}

alert(returnDuplicates(arr));

This function avoids the sorting step and uses the reduce() method to push duplicates to a new array if it doesn't already exist in it.

3

Using "includes" to test if the element already exists.

var arr = [1, 1, 4, 5, 5], darr = [], duplicates = [];

for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){
  if(darr.includes(arr[i]) && !duplicates.includes(arr[i]))
    duplicates.push(arr[i])
  else
    darr.push(arr[i]);
}

console.log(duplicates);
<h3>Array with duplicates</h3>
<p>[1, 1, 4, 5, 5]</p>
<h3>Array with distinct elements</h3>
<p>[1, 4, 5]</p>
<h3>duplicate values are</h3>
<p>[1, 5]</p>

  • The code does give back distinct elements, but does not lead to the given result. Please provide complete correct code . – RWC Jan 14 '17 at 11:51
3

ES6 offers the Set data structure which is basically an array that doesn't accept duplicates. With the Set data structure, there's a very easy way to find duplicates in an array (using only one loop).

Here's my code

function findDuplicate(arr) {
var set = new Set();
var duplicates = new Set();
  for (let i = 0; i< arr.length; i++) {
     var size = set.size;
     set.add(arr[i]);
     if (set.size === size) {
         duplicates.add(arr[i]);
     }
  }
 return duplicates;
}
3

I have just figured out a simple way to achieve this using an Array filter

    var list = [9, 9, 111, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 7];
    
    // Filter 1: to find all duplicates elements
    var duplicates = list.filter(function(value,index,self) {
       return self.indexOf(value) !== self.lastIndexOf(value) && self.indexOf(value) === index;
    });
    
    console.log(duplicates);

3

Following logic will be easier and faster

// @Param:data:Array that is the source 
// @Return : Array that have the duplicate entries
findDuplicates(data: Array<any>): Array<any> {
        return Array.from(new Set(data)).filter((value) => data.indexOf(value) !== data.lastIndexOf(value));
      }

Advantages :

  1. Single line :-P
  2. All inbuilt data structure helping in improving the efficiency
  3. Faster

Description of Logic :

  1. Converting to set to remove all duplicates
  2. Iterating through the set values
  3. With each set value check in the source array for the condition "values first index is not equal to the last index" == > Then inferred as duplicate else it is 'unique'

Note: map() and filter() methods are efficient and faster.

  • 1
    Tested this... very fast. and it makes sense.. wish i thought about it – Michael Rhema Jun 2 at 20:50
2

Just to add some theory to the above.

Finding duplicates has a lower bound of O(n*log(n) in the comparison model. SO theoretically, you cannot do any better than first sorting then going through the list sequentially removing any duplicates you find.

If you want to find the duplicates in linear (O(n)) expected time, you could hash each element of the list; if there is a collision, remove/label it as a duplicate, and continue.

  • Agreed. The only reason to try different approaches here is that the speed depends on how well various things are implemented in the runtime. And that's going to vary browser-to-browser. For short lists, it probably doesn't matter much how you solve the problem. For large arrays, it does. – Nosredna May 9 '09 at 0:34
2
var input = ['a', 'b', 'a', 'c', 'c'],
    duplicates = [],
    i, j;
for (i = 0, j = input.length; i < j; i++) {
  if (duplicates.indexOf(input[i]) === -1 && input.indexOf(input[i], i+1) !== -1) {
    duplicates.push(input[i]);
  }
}

console.log(duplicates);
2

I think the below is the easiest and fastest O(n) way to accomplish exactly what you asked:

function getDuplicates( arr ) {
  var i, value;
  var all = {};
  var duplicates = [];

  for( i=0; i<arr.length; i++ ) {
    value = arr[i];
    if( all[value] ) {
      duplicates.push( value );
      all[value] = false;
    } else if( typeof all[value] == "undefined" ) {
      all[value] = true;
    }
  }

  return duplicates;
}

Or for ES5 or greater:

function getDuplicates( arr ) {
  var all = {};
  return arr.reduce(function( duplicates, value ) {
    if( all[value] ) {
      duplicates.push(value);
      all[value] = false;
    } else if( typeof all[value] == "undefined" ) {
      all[value] = true;
    }
    return duplicates;
  }, []);
}
2

Modifying @RaphaelMontanaro's solution, borrowing from @Nosredna's blog, here is what you could do if you just want to identify the duplicate elements from your array.

function identifyDuplicatesFromArray(arr) {
        var i;
        var len = arr.length;
        var obj = {};
        var duplicates = [];

        for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {

            if (!obj[arr[i]]) {

                obj[arr[i]] = {};

            }

            else
            {
                duplicates.push(arr[i]);
            }

        }
        return duplicates;
    }

Thanks for the elegant solution, @Nosredna!

2

I did not like most answers.

Why? Too complicated, too much code, inefficient code and many do not answer the question, which is to find the duplicates (and not to give an array without the duplicates).

Next function returns all duplicates:

function GetDuplicates(arr) {
  var i, out=[], obj={};
  for (i=0; i < arr.length; i++) 
    obj[arr[i]] == undefined ? obj[arr[i]] ++ : out.push(arr[i]);
  return out;
}  

Because most of the time it is of no use to return ALL duplicates, but just to tell which duplicate values exist. In that case you return an array with unique duplicates ;-)

function GetDuplicates(arr) {
  var i, out=[], obj={};
  for (i=0; i < arr.length; i++)
    obj[arr[i]] == undefined ? obj[arr[i]] ++ : out.push(arr[i]);
  return GetUnique(out);
}

function GetUnique(arr) {
  return $.grep(arr, function(elem, index) {
    return index == $.inArray(elem, arr);
  });
}

Maybe somebody else thinks the same.

protected by chris p bacon Feb 28 '16 at 10:45

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