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I am looking for a solution to the following:

Database: A
Table: InvoiceLines

Database: B
Table: MyLog

Every time lines are added to InvoiceLines in database A, I want to run a query that updates the table MyLog in database B. And I want it instantly.

Normally I would create a trigger in database A on INSERT in InvoiceLines. The problem is that database A belongs to a ERP program where I don't want to make any changes at all (updates, unknown functionality in 3-layer program, etc)

Any hints to help me in the right direction...?

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  • unless you're in for hijacking the db-socket, I'm afraid triggers is your only way here. – Teson Dec 7 '11 at 0:06
  • Yep, triggers are the mechanism provided to do this. If you don't want to use them can't really think of any non kludgey alternatives. – Martin Smith Dec 7 '11 at 0:16
  • It's as if you wanted to know everything that happened in a house where you were not authorised to install a CCTV camera. – Andriy M Dec 7 '11 at 7:37
  • well if you can't do anything on the DB itself then you will have to use an external app to monitor the table and post the changes in Database B. – Asher Dec 7 '11 at 7:49
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You can use transactional replication to send changes from your table in database A to a copy in DB B, then create your triggers on the copy. It's not "instant," but it's usually considered "near real time."

You might be able to use DB mirroring to do this somehow, but you'd have to do some testing to see if you could get it to work right (maybe set up triggers in the mirror that don't exist in the original?)

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One possible solution to replicate trigger's functionality without database update is to poll the table by an external application (i.e. java) which on finding new insert would fire required query.

In SQLServer2008, something similar can be done via C# assembly but again this needs to be installed which requires database update.

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