13

Is there a function in the Delphi standard library to search string arrays for a particular value?

e.g.

someArray:=TArray<string>.Create('One','Two','Three');
if ArrayContains(someArray, 'Two') then
    ShowMessage('It contains Two');
1
  • If you want to Sort it first you can use BinarySearch, but I don't know of one for a non-sorted TArray, hopefully someone does. – Seth Carnegie Dec 7 '11 at 0:54
31

There is absolutely no need to reinvent the wheel. StrUtils.MatchStr does the job.

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  someArray: TArray<string>;
begin
  someArray:=TArray<string>.Create('One','Two','Three');
  if MatchStr('Two', someArray) then
    ShowMessage('It contains Two');
end;

Note the parameter order convention.

Another note: MatchStr is a canonicalized name assigned to this function somewhen in between Delphi 7 and Delphi 2007. Historical name is AnsiMatchStr (convention is the same as in the rest of RTL: Str/Text suffix for case-sensitivity, Ansi prefix for MBCS/Locale)

5
  • 2
    +1. Nice! I hadn't caught that one (probably because the name doesn't match what it actually does). Do you know what Delphi version it appeared in? – Ken White Dec 7 '11 at 3:17
  • There is no much point in using parametrized type declaration while dealing with arrays. Arrays are not classes and cannot be extended to support eg. Java-style Array.indexOf – OnTheFly Dec 7 '11 at 3:18
  • Um... I'm not sure what exactly your last comment is referencing. Parameterized type declarations are necessary when dealing with pre-generics versions of Delphi, and this wasn't tagged with a specific Delphi version (although it uses a generic array). Are you criticizing the fact I gave you an upvote? If you are, I can take it back. :) – Ken White Dec 7 '11 at 3:20
  • I also do not understand the comment regarding parametrized type declarations. Care to expand? – awmross Dec 7 '11 at 6:20
  • @awmross, that was more like note to myself. Look at System.TArray<T> and Generics.Collections.TArray<T>. They are very distinct types, and i think intermixing them is very misleading (i know what you are using Generics.Collections.TArray<T>.Create merely to utilize open array constructor) – OnTheFly Dec 7 '11 at 8:20
5

you can use the TArray.BinarySearch function, which is part of the Generics.Collections unit.

check this sample

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses    
  Generics.Defaults,
  Generics.Collections,
  System.SysUtils;

Var
  someArray: TArray<string>;
  FoundIndex : Integer;

begin
  try
    someArray:=TArray<string>.Create('a','b','c');
    if TArray.BinarySearch<String>(someArray, 'b', FoundIndex, TStringComparer.Ordinal) then
     Writeln(Format('Found in index %d',[FoundIndex]))
    else
     Writeln('Not Found');
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
  Readln;
end.

Note: BinarySearch requires that the array be sorted.

3
  • will this work? "Note: BinarySearch requires that the array be sorted.". Do you have to sort the array first? – awmross Dec 7 '11 at 1:23
  • I have a feeling that using for loop on unsorted array will be faster than sorting itself .. – Kromster Dec 7 '11 at 5:54
  • 2
    For a one-time use, you are right, @Krom. If you need to search the array multiple times, then it can become worth the time to sort the array. The price you pay to sort the array pays off in the time you save in searching it. Compare repeated O(N) searches with a one-time O(N log N) sort followed by repeated O(log N) searches. If you perform more than log N searches, you should sort the list first. – Rob Kennedy Dec 23 '11 at 16:52
5

I wrote one I modeled after the old Clipper AScan function (tested in XE). @RRUZ's answer is more correct (there is one existing), but mine doesn't require the array to be sorted first and is fast enough on small arrays. (It also works in pre-generics versions of Delphi.) I also overload it for various types of array - here are the implementations for string and integer:

// Returns the 0-based index of Value if it's found in the array,
// -1 if not. (Similar to TStrings.IndexOf)
function AScan(const Ar: array of string; const Value: string): Integer; overload;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  Result := -1;
  for i := Low(Ar) to High(Ar) do
    if SameText(Ar[i], Value) then
    begin
      Result := i;
      Break
    end;
end;

function AScan(const Ar: array of Integer; const Value: Integer): Integer; overload;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  Result := -1;
  for i := Low(Ar) to High(Ar) do
    if (Ar[i] = Value) then
    begin
      Result := i;
      Break
    end;
end;

procedure TForm2.FormShow(Sender: TObject);
var
  someStrArray: TArray<string>;
  someIntArray: TArray<Integer>;
  Idx: Integer;
begin
  someStrArray := TArray<string>.Create('One', 'Two', 'Three');
  Idx := AScan(someStrArray, 'Two');
  if Idx > -1 then
    ShowMessage(Format('It contains Two at index %d', [Idx]))
  else
    ShowMessage('Not found');
  someIntArray := TArray<Integer>.Create(8, 16, 32);
  Idx := AScan(someIntArray, 32);
  if Idx > -1 then
    ShowMessage(Format('It contains 32 at %d', [Idx]))
  else
    ShowMessage('16 not found');
end;

For versions of Delphi that support generics, here's a version that doesn't require the array to be sorted, and that also allows you to provide the comparison function if needed:

Interface:

type
  TGenericsUtils = class
  public
    class function AScan<T>(const Arr: array of T; const Value: T; const Comparer: IEqualityComparer<T>):  Integer; overload;
    class function AScan<T>(const Arr: array of T; const Value: T): Integer; overload;
  end;

Implementation

class function TGenericsUtils.AScan<T>(const Arr: array of T; const Value: T): Integer;
begin
  Result := AScan<T>(Arr, Value, TEqualityComparer<T>.Default);
end;

class function TGenericsUtils.AScan<T>(const Arr: array of T; const Value: T;
  const Comparer: IEqualityComparer<T>): Integer;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := Low(Arr) to High(Arr) do
    if Comparer.Equals(Arr[i], Value) then
      Exit(i);
  Exit(-1);
end;

Test code:

var
  AIntTest: TIntegerDynArray;
  AStrTest: TStringDynArray;

begin
  AIntTest := TIntegerDynArray.Create(12, 15, 6, 1, 4, 9, 5);
  AStrTest := TStringDynArray.Create('One', 'Six', 'Three', 'Four', 'Twelve');
  WriteLn('AIntTest contains 9 at index ', TGenericsUtils.AScan<Integer>(AIntTest, 9));
  WriteLn('AStrTest contains ''Four'' at index ', TGenericsUtils.AScan<String>(AStrTest, 'Four'));
  ReadLn;
end.
2
  • 2
    "..No, there isn't.", What about TArray.BinarySearch? – RRUZ Dec 7 '11 at 1:14
  • Ah, missed that one (didn't see the generics when I wrote that; caught them when I actually wrote the code to respond, but didn't fix the error). Thanks, Rodrigo. :) Corrected, and +1 to your answer for being more correct. – Ken White Dec 7 '11 at 1:29

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