42

If I have a python class, how can I alias that class-name into another class-name and retain all it's methods and class members and instance members? Is this possible without using inheritance?

e.g. I have a class like:

class MyReallyBigClassNameWhichIHateToType:
    def __init__(self):
         <blah>
    [...]

I'm creating an interactive console session where I don't want my users' fingers to fall off while instantiating the class in the interactive sessions, so I want to alias that really long class name to something tiny like 'C'. Is there an easy way to do this without inheritance?

91
C = MyReallyBigClassNameWhichIHateToType
2
  • 6
    Works well, but leads to confusion on the long run. If you hate to type it, why not just fix the name once and forever? – S.Lott May 8 '09 at 17:39
  • 3
    I was exaggerating. The original name is 7 characters long, but I truly want the interactive name to be 1 character long. – Ross Rogers May 8 '09 at 17:41
48

Also, if you're importing the name from another module...

from modulename import ReallyLongNameWhichIHateToType as FriendlyName
3
  • 5
    Much cleaner than assignment, I think. – fatuhoku Sep 23 '13 at 11:01
  • 1
    But can you do this inside the own modulename? – artu-hnrq Dec 19 '19 at 3:07
  • That include module name, for short ! – Henry198 Jun 23 '20 at 14:25
14

You can simply do:

ShortName = MyReallyBigClassNameWhichIHateToType

A class in Python is just an object like any other, and can have more than one name.

11

Refactor the name, no reason it should have a name that long.

Otherwise whateverName = VeryLongClassName should do the trick.

2
  • The name isn't that long, but I want it to be exactly 1 character when I use the class in the interactive session. – Ross Rogers May 8 '09 at 17:40
  • 3
    the first answer, no upvotes, same as the accepted answer which has 24 upvotes ... have to +1 just b/c – Skylar Saveland Sep 9 '12 at 1:30
4

Simple name assignment approach works but has one disadvantage that might be important in some cases: the alias name will be the same as the name of the "base" class because of the __name__ property.

class C(object):
    pass

D = C

print(C.__name__)  # 'C'
print(D.__name__)  # 'C' again

For example, if you create custom exception and then another one that assigning the first one you will get the name of this "parent" exception every time no matter which one of them you raise and this should probably confuse a user:

class CustomBaseException(Exception):

    def __init__(self, operation):
        super(CustomBaseException, self).__init__()
        self.operation = operation

    def __str__(self):
        return f"Invalid operation '{self.operation}'"


OperationException = CustomBaseException

raise OperationException('readd')

output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 12, in <module>
CustomBaseException: Invalid operation 'readd'

So a solution would be to actually subclass the class:

class CustomBaseException(Exception):

    def __init__(self, operation):
        super(CustomBaseException, self).__init__()
        self.operation = operation

    def __str__(self):
        return f"Invalid operation '{self.operation}'"


class OperationException(CustomBaseException):
    pass


raise OperationException('delite')

output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 14, in <module>
OperationException: Invalid operation 'delite'

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