2

I am hiding a control panel (myNestContainer) on document ready. I have a button called navMyNest that when mouseenter occurs, shows the myNestContainer. This works fine.

The issue is that I want the user to be able to explore the control panel, however given there are nested DIV containers in the myNestContainer, as soon as one is entered, the mouseleave take effect and the control panel closes.

This is working much better then mouseenter/mouseout, but still don't have the functionality I'd like.

Any thoughts on how to overrided the child objects so that the control panel stays open while the user is look through it?

Thanks in advance.

$(document).ready(function() {
$("div#myNestContainer").hide();
});

$("div#navMyNest").live("mouseenter", function(event) {
    $("div#myNestContainer").show();
});

$("div#myNestContainer").live("mouseleave", function(event) {
    $("div#myNestContainer").hide();
});
  • 3
    Never do div#myNestContainer, leave out the div part. It slows down your selector considerably. Just do #myNestContainer. Also, try not to run the same selector more than once. Store it in a variable instead. And finally, when you're in a function like the live callback, this is set to the DOM element you called it on. So rather than doing your hide and show against that selector again, do $(this).hide();. – Adam Terlson Dec 7 '11 at 17:05
  • 1
    @AdamTerlson: Good points. Also worth mentioning is, that since jQuery 1.7 live() is deprecated in favor of on(). – Tadeck Dec 8 '11 at 4:41
  • @Tadeck Right on, definitely worth mentioning. – Adam Terlson Dec 8 '11 at 19:40
5

Use event.relatedTarget to keep the parent element visible if the mouse moves to the nested element.

$('#myNestContainer').mouseout(function(e)
{
    var evt = e || window.event;
    if (evt.relatedTarget != document.getElementById('navMyNest'))
    {
        $("#myNestContainer").hide();
    }
});
  • You win! That's the answer :) – Jason Moore Dec 7 '11 at 17:19
  • glad I could help! – Aaron Dec 7 '11 at 17:20
  • 3
    @JasonMoore then please approve the answer. Click the tick on the left of it, under the vote count. – jibiel Feb 25 '13 at 13:00
0

I had to resort to lots of ugly hacks to get this type of thing to work. And it was browser-specific hacks, too. In my case, I had iframe elements in my nested elements.

I had to use delays/timeouts, get the (x,y) position of the mouse, and respond to mousemove events.

Basically, you have to keep checking on regular intervals until mouse is outside bounding area, and then remove element.

I used a fade out effect to remove element to make lag time a little more unnoticeable.

See it in action by hovering of Facebook 'f' icon in top right corner: http://www2.highpoint.edu/

  • Also a good suggestion, I like the fade effect - very clean. Will incorporate. – Jason Moore Dec 7 '11 at 17:24
0

you can use jquery hover function to overcome the issue...

http://api.jquery.com/hover/

It basically handles the problem you are currently facing. Use the following piece of code

 $("div#myNestContainer").hover( 

    function () {
     $("div#myNestContainer").show(); 
    },

    function () { 
    $("div#myNestContainer").hide(); 
    }
);
  • But I am using div#navMyNest to show the control panel to begin with ...how would they hover on an item that is hidden at document ready? – Jason Moore Dec 7 '11 at 17:17
  • can you share your HTML – Kamran Ali Dec 7 '11 at 17:19

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