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Is there a way to execute an arbitrary query on a SQL Server using Powershell on my local machine?

166
0

For others who need to do this with just stock .net and PowerShell (no additional SQL tools installed) here is the function that I use:

function Invoke-SQL {
    param(
        [string] $dataSource = ".\SQLEXPRESS",
        [string] $database = "MasterData",
        [string] $sqlCommand = $(throw "Please specify a query.")
      )

    $connectionString = "Data Source=$dataSource; " +
            "Integrated Security=SSPI; " +
            "Initial Catalog=$database"

    $connection = new-object system.data.SqlClient.SQLConnection($connectionString)
    $command = new-object system.data.sqlclient.sqlcommand($sqlCommand,$connection)
    $connection.Open()

    $adapter = New-Object System.Data.sqlclient.sqlDataAdapter $command
    $dataset = New-Object System.Data.DataSet
    $adapter.Fill($dataSet) | Out-Null

    $connection.Close()
    $dataSet.Tables

}

I have been using this so long I don't know who wrote which parts but this was distilled from other's examples but simplified to be clear and just what is needed without extra dependencies or features.

I use and share this often enough that I have turned this into a script module on GitHub so that you can now go to your modules directory and execute git clone https://github.com/ChrisMagnuson/InvokeSQL and from that point forward invoke-sql will automatically be loaded when you go to use it (assuming your using powershell v3 or later).

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  • does disposal not matter here or in powershell? – Maslow May 27 '14 at 15:44
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    @Maslow I couldn't say for sure, I know that this works fine without disposing of the objects but if you have a single powershell.exe process that will call this multiple times over weeks without closing then it might eventually be an issue but you would have to test that. – Chris Magnuson May 28 '14 at 14:36
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    Note that this forces you to write scripts that may be vulnerable to sql injection attacks, if they depend on reading data for the query from a source that relies on user input. – Joel Coehoorn Jun 17 '14 at 21:38
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    @AllTradesJack Google Sql Injection. The Invoke-Sql command doesn't have a way to include parameters separate from the command text. This pretty much guarantees you used string concatenation to build the queries, and that's a big no-no. – Joel Coehoorn Jan 14 '17 at 1:36
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    Works well for me. For anyone wondering, to dispose an object, just add $connection.dispose() etc. I don't know if it makes any difference though – Nick.McDermaid Aug 15 '17 at 11:34
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0

You can use the Invoke-Sqlcmd cmdlet

Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query "SELECT GETDATE() AS TimeOfQuery;" -ServerInstance "MyComputer\MyInstance"

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc281720.aspx

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  • 22
    Someone should mention this may be great if you are in the context of the sql server, but not so much if you are using your workstation ... – aikeru Jun 27 '13 at 22:07
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    You can run this anywhere the SQL Server client tools (SSMS) are installed. It works fine from any workstation, whether it's running SQL Server or not. – alroc Sep 21 '13 at 17:56
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    Use the following import to have the cmdlet available: Import-Module "sqlps" -DisableNameChecking – xx1xx Mar 21 '14 at 5:52
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    If you're still on SQL 2008 R2 you need to use a work around module: sev17.com/2010/07/10/making-a-sqlps-module – Vincent De Smet Dec 21 '15 at 9:10
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    Invoke-SqlCmd is an endless nightmare of bizarre edge-cases and inconsistent behavior. Why is it outputting columns sometimes and not other times? Where are my error messages? Why is it on one computer or not another? How do I install it? The answer to each question is worse than the last. – Pxtl Aug 7 '18 at 21:29
28
0

Here's an example I found on this blog.

$cn2 = new-object system.data.SqlClient.SQLConnection("Data Source=machine1;Integrated Security=SSPI;Initial Catalog=master");
$cmd = new-object system.data.sqlclient.sqlcommand("dbcc freeproccache", $cn2);
$cn2.Open();
if ($cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() -ne -1)
{
    echo "Failed";
}
$cn2.Close();

Presumably you could substitute a different TSQL statement where it says dbcc freeproccache.

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    This solution worked for me, however, ExecuteNonQuery() returned zero on success, the condition that I use is: if ($cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() -ne 0). – Gixabel Apr 10 '18 at 21:53
  • Seems it returns the number of lines impacted. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – NicolasW Feb 2 '19 at 0:55
27
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This function will return the results of a query as an array of powershell objects so you can use them in filters and access columns easily:

function sql($sqlText, $database = "master", $server = ".")
{
    $connection = new-object System.Data.SqlClient.SQLConnection("Data Source=$server;Integrated Security=SSPI;Initial Catalog=$database");
    $cmd = new-object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand($sqlText, $connection);

    $connection.Open();
    $reader = $cmd.ExecuteReader()

    $results = @()
    while ($reader.Read())
    {
        $row = @{}
        for ($i = 0; $i -lt $reader.FieldCount; $i++)
        {
            $row[$reader.GetName($i)] = $reader.GetValue($i)
        }
        $results += new-object psobject -property $row            
    }
    $connection.Close();

    $results
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Why is this preferable over filling a DataTable (see Adam's answer)? – alroc Aug 1 '13 at 11:20
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    There probably isn't a huge difference, but SqlDataReaders are generally preferred because they consume less resources. That isn't likely to be relevant here but it is nice to get real objects back instead of a datatable that you can use in foreach and where clauses without worrying about the source of the data. – mcobrien Aug 1 '13 at 12:08
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    an example usage would be nice. – Eric Schneider May 24 '18 at 13:38
  • Sometimes there are not enough stars – Fred B May 29 '19 at 15:07
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If you want to do it on your local machine instead of in the context of SQL server then I would use the following. It is what we use at my company.

$ServerName = "_ServerName_"
$DatabaseName = "_DatabaseName_"
$Query = "SELECT * FROM Table WHERE Column = ''"

#Timeout parameters
$QueryTimeout = 120
$ConnectionTimeout = 30

#Action of connecting to the Database and executing the query and returning results if there were any.
$conn=New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SQLConnection
$ConnectionString = "Server={0};Database={1};Integrated Security=True;Connect Timeout={2}" -f $ServerName,$DatabaseName,$ConnectionTimeout
$conn.ConnectionString=$ConnectionString
$conn.Open()
$cmd=New-Object system.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand($Query,$conn)
$cmd.CommandTimeout=$QueryTimeout
$ds=New-Object system.Data.DataSet
$da=New-Object system.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter($cmd)
[void]$da.fill($ds)
$conn.Close()
$ds.Tables

Just fill in the $ServerName, $DatabaseName and the $Query variables and you should be good to go.

I am not sure how we originally found this out, but there is something very similar here.

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12
0
Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query "sp_who" -ServerInstance . -QueryTimeout 3
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  • it will show number of connection in sql used by powershell command – arnav Nov 9 '16 at 19:21
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There isn't a built-in "PowerShell" way of running a SQL query. If you have the SQL Server tools installed, you'll get an Invoke-SqlCmd cmdlet.

Because PowerShell is built on .NET, you can use the ADO.NET API to run your queries.

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0
0

To avoid SQL Injection with varchar parameters you could use


function sqlExecuteRead($connectionString, $sqlCommand, $pars) {

        $connection = new-object system.data.SqlClient.SQLConnection($connectionString)
        $connection.Open()
        $command = new-object system.data.sqlclient.sqlcommand($sqlCommand, $connection)

        if ($pars -and $pars.Keys) {
            foreach($key in $pars.keys) {
                # avoid injection in varchar parameters
                $par = $command.Parameters.Add("@$key", [system.data.SqlDbType]::VarChar, 512);
                $par.Value = $pars[$key];
            }
        }

        $adapter = New-Object System.Data.sqlclient.sqlDataAdapter $command
        $dataset = New-Object System.Data.DataSet
        $adapter.Fill($dataset) | Out-Null
        $connection.Close()
        return $dataset.tables[0].rows

    }

    $connectionString = "..."
    $sql = "select top 10 Message, TimeStamp, Level from dbo.log "+
        "where Message = @MSG and Level like @LEVEL ";
    $pars = @{
        MSG = 'this is a test from powershell'; 
        LEVEL = 'aaa%';
    };
    sqlExecuteRead $connectionString $sql $pars
| improve this answer | |

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