12

Rather than reinvent the wheel, I wonder if anyone could refer me to a 1D linear convolution code snippet in ANSI C? I did a search on google and in stack overflow, but couldn't find anything in C I could use.

For example, for Arrays A, B, and C, all double-precision, where A and B are inputs and C is output, having lengths len_A, len_B, and len_C = len_A + len_B - 1, respectively.

My array sizes are small and so any speed increase in implementing fast convolution by FFT is not needed. Looking for straightforward computation.

  • What platform are you targeting? It's entirely possible that such a function already exists and you can use that. – Stephen Canon Dec 8 '11 at 1:14
  • I'm using gcc4.4.4 and centos 5.7 on linux 64 bit server. – ggkmath Dec 8 '11 at 1:38
  • 1
    After much searching, I did find the following code for LinearConvolution(), which in my implementation of it works fast and produces same results as Matlab, although the code isn't quite as easy to read and understand as Alex's below. Not sure if there are any differences otherwise. Initially I thought this was C++ code, but it seems to run fine when compiled with -ansi switch in my C program. I've linked it here in case it's useful to others. dsprelated.com/showmessage/71405/1.php – ggkmath Dec 8 '11 at 2:04
22

Here's how:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void convolve(const double Signal[/* SignalLen */], size_t SignalLen,
              const double Kernel[/* KernelLen */], size_t KernelLen,
              double Result[/* SignalLen + KernelLen - 1 */])
{
  size_t n;

  for (n = 0; n < SignalLen + KernelLen - 1; n++)
  {
    size_t kmin, kmax, k;

    Result[n] = 0;

    kmin = (n >= KernelLen - 1) ? n - (KernelLen - 1) : 0;
    kmax = (n < SignalLen - 1) ? n : SignalLen - 1;

    for (k = kmin; k <= kmax; k++)
    {
      Result[n] += Signal[k] * Kernel[n - k];
    }
  }
}

void printSignal(const char* Name,
                 double Signal[/* SignalLen */], size_t SignalLen)
{
  size_t i;

  for (i = 0; i < SignalLen; i++)
  {
    printf("%s[%zu] = %f\n", Name, i, Signal[i]);
  }
  printf("\n");
}

#define ELEMENT_COUNT(X) (sizeof(X) / sizeof((X)[0]))

int main(void)
{
  double signal[] = { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 };
  double kernel[] = { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 };
  double result[ELEMENT_COUNT(signal) + ELEMENT_COUNT(kernel) - 1];

  convolve(signal, ELEMENT_COUNT(signal),
           kernel, ELEMENT_COUNT(kernel),
           result);

  printSignal("signal", signal, ELEMENT_COUNT(signal));
  printSignal("kernel", kernel, ELEMENT_COUNT(kernel));
  printSignal("result", result, ELEMENT_COUNT(result));

  return 0;
}

Output:

signal[0] = 1.000000
signal[1] = 1.000000
signal[2] = 1.000000
signal[3] = 1.000000
signal[4] = 1.000000

kernel[0] = 1.000000
kernel[1] = 1.000000
kernel[2] = 1.000000
kernel[3] = 1.000000
kernel[4] = 1.000000

result[0] = 1.000000
result[1] = 2.000000
result[2] = 3.000000
result[3] = 4.000000
result[4] = 5.000000
result[5] = 4.000000
result[6] = 3.000000
result[7] = 2.000000
result[8] = 1.000000
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Alex, I just copied/implemented the convolve() function above into my program and it seems to run fast and produce essentially the exact same results as Matlab's conv function, which should be doing the same thing (e.g. it's not FFT based). The code is also quite easy to read, thanks so much. Are there any assumptions or other things to be aware of (limits, etc.) here? – ggkmath Dec 8 '11 at 2:01
  • 1
    Lengths and pointers apparently must not be 0. Also, SignalLen + KernelLen - 1 <= (size_t)-1. Floating-point values should be valid as well. Nothing unusual. – Alexey Frunze Dec 8 '11 at 2:07
3

Not tested, but it seems like it would work...

void conv(const double v1[], size_t n1, const double v2[], size_t n2, double r[])
{
    for (size_t n = 0; n < n1 + n2 - 1; n++)
        for (size_t k = 0; k < max(n1, n2); k++)
            r[n] += (k < n1 ? v1[k] : 0) * (n - k < n2 ? v2[n - k] : 0);
}

Tip: If it takes less time to reinvent a wheel than to find one, do consider the former.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Mehrdad, I understand the two loops, but the conditional statements in the r[n] expression -- are they simply preventing multiplying array values having negative indices? Or, can you explain them briefly? Also, should r[n] be initialized to 0 after the first loop and before the second loop, or are you assuming r has already been initialized to zero for all elements? – ggkmath Dec 8 '11 at 0:19
  • @ggkmath: I'm assuming the results are initially zero. And yes, the conditionals are just to prevent out-of-bound indices. – user541686 Dec 8 '11 at 0:31
  • I don't think the max() function is ansi C compatible, so I just created a function to do it instead. With a small test array it worked fine. When I used my real arrays (size around 20K elements), it somehow contained a ghost image of one of the input arrays in the output. Either I made an error in implementing the function above, or the data sets between this test and the initial test was different from the algorithm's point of view (not sure). – ggkmath Dec 8 '11 at 1:58
  • @ggkmath: I really can't say anything without seeing your example. – user541686 Dec 8 '11 at 4:29
  • @Mehrdad: you don't zero r[n] before the inner loop gets to increment it, IOW, conv() expects r[] initialized to all 0.0's. That may have been the problem. – Alexey Frunze Dec 8 '11 at 9:26
1

Since, we are taking convolution of 2 finite length sequences, hence the desired frequency response is achieved if circular convolution is performed rather than linear convolution. A very simple implementation of circular convolution will achieve the same result as the algorithm given by Alex.

#define MOD(n, N) ((n<0)? N+n : n)
......
......

for(n=0; n < signal_Length + Kernel_Length - 1; n++)
{
    out[n] = 0;
    for(m=0; m < Kernel_Length; m++)
    {
        out[n] = h[m] * x[MOD(n-m, N)];
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I used @Mehrdad's approach, and created the following anwer:

void conv(const double v1[], size_t n1, const double v2[], size_t n2, double r[])
{
    for (size_t n = 0; n < n1 + n2 - 1; n++)
        for (size_t k = 0; k < max(n1, n2) && n >= k; k++)
            r[n] += (k < n1 ? v1[k] : 0) * (n - k < n2 ? v2[n - k] : 0);
}

There's problem with index exceeding lower bound when in second loops k gets bigger than n, so, guess there should be extra condition to prevent that.

| improve this answer | |

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