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What is the difference between #include <filename> and #include “filename”?
Difference between writing #import <filename.h> and #import “filename.h” i.e written the file name in angular brackets and quotes?

This might be a stupid question. What is the difference between #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> and #import "QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h"? (greater-than/less-than vs the double-quotes)

They both seem to work.

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2 Answers 2

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In general the #import "QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h" form is "find my very own header, if you can't find it look for a system header", and the <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> form is "find a system header". In theory the locations are compiler defined and they could be implemented differently on a given platform, but I haven't run into a C compiler that does anything different.

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  • the #import "QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h" doesn't look for a system header. its xCode that imports frameworks to local headers.
    – Daniel
    Commented Dec 7, 2011 at 23:48
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    The double quote version looks for system headers if local ones are not found, that is why he said "They both seem to work". (there is a build setting to make <> search user paths first, but I didn't figure it was all that important for this question) -- try #include "stdio.h" it'll find it.
    – Stripes
    Commented Dec 8, 2011 at 0:02
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#include <something> tells the compiler to look in all include directories.
#include "something" tells the compiler to look only in the directory of the file with the include in it.

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    Not correct. The standard explicitly states that if the normal search for #include "something" fails, it is reprocessed as though it said #include <something>. So it is more correct to say that the quoted version looks in the same directory first, but then looks in all the include directories.
    – rdb
    Commented Nov 11, 2018 at 11:19

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