481

I want to build a dictionary in Python. However, all the examples that I see are instantiating a dictionary from a list, etc . ..

How do I create a new empty dictionary in Python?

694

Call dict with no parameters

new_dict = dict()

or simply write

new_dict = {}
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  • 42
    Is there any difference between dict() and {}? Or do people just prefer one over the other? – Matt Mar 2 '12 at 17:13
  • 53
    @ Matt Apparently CPython 2.7 dict() is slower (6 times slower?), See: doughellmann.com/2012/11/… In any case I am starting to prefer the constructor syntax anyways since I find it easier to type and move code between dicts and function calls. – David Wheaton Mar 5 '13 at 20:53
  • 16
    I confirm it's 3 times faster to use { } than dict() in python 3.x – Alex Azazel Jan 3 '17 at 19:09
  • 8
    Yeah, I get about 4 times faster in python 3.6 for {} over dict() and 5 times for [] over list(). – Michael Hall Dec 19 '17 at 14:40
  • 16
    In the vast majority of cases, it doesn't matter if it takes six times longer, since that's still an unnoticeably small amount of time. – hypehuman Jan 10 '19 at 20:43
256

You can do this

x = {}
x['a'] = 1
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29

Knowing how to write a preset dictionary is useful to know as well:

cmap =  {'US':'USA','GB':'Great Britain'}

# Explicitly:
# -----------
def cxlate(country):
    try:
        ret = cmap[country]
    except KeyError:
        ret = '?'
    return ret

present = 'US' # this one is in the dict
missing = 'RU' # this one is not

print cxlate(present) # == USA
print cxlate(missing) # == ?

# or, much more simply as suggested below:

print cmap.get(present,'?') # == USA
print cmap.get(missing,'?') # == ?

# with country codes, you might prefer to return the original on failure:

print cmap.get(present,present) # == USA
print cmap.get(missing,missing) # == RU
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  • 4
    Good point! But I think the bit with cxlate makes your answer seem too complicates. I'd just keep the initialization part. (cxlate itself is too complicated. You could just return cmap.get(country, '?').) – Daniel Darabos Apr 11 '15 at 20:14
  • Consider using docs.python.org/2/library/… instead of writing a translate function or using .get() everywhere. – Sparr Jun 30 '15 at 16:20
  • 1
    Perhaps I would, except that the documentation is absolutely opaque to me -- it's terrible. I have no idea what they're telling me to do, or why I should do it. And .get() seems to do exactly the right thing -- plus it's extremely flexible. I'm sure its a lack of understanding on my part. With that in mind, my questions are: why bother? What is saved here, easier here, faster here, etc.? Benefit is exactly what? – fyngyrz Jul 1 '15 at 12:01
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    Unrelated, but you should explicitly catch the KeyError instead of a bare except (which would catch things such as KeyboardInterrupt and SystemExit). – Arnav Borborah Mar 10 '19 at 17:47
  • Arnav, yes of course you're right. Edited accordingly. Thank you! – fyngyrz Jun 26 '19 at 15:58
20
>>> dict(a=2,b=4)
{'a': 2, 'b': 4}

Will add the value in the python dictionary.

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17
d = dict()

or

d = {}

or

import types
d = types.DictType.__new__(types.DictType, (), {})
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  • What is the difference between types.DictType.__new__(types.DictType, (), {}) and just {} – user10449636 Sep 3 '19 at 7:37
  • 3
    For anyone reading this: the last "solution" is a bit of a joke - you can use it (in python 2.x at least - won't work in py3k), but no one in it's own mind would ever want to do so ;-) – bruno desthuilliers Sep 3 '19 at 7:58
7

So there 2 ways to create a dict :

  1. my_dict = dict()

  2. my_dict = {}

But out of these two options {} is efficient than dict() plus its readable. CHECK HERE

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5
>>> dict.fromkeys(['a','b','c'],[1,2,3])


{'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': [1, 2, 3], 'c': [1, 2, 3]}
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  • the question states that the dictionary should be a new empty instance – Wesam Oct 20 '18 at 9:15

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