1

I need to sort the names. and these names some times stats with number and how can i make to sort on the number if name has and if doesn't.At present i am sorting only alphabets.

Ex: 3.Animal
    1.Box
    4.Monkey
    2.Tiger

But i need to display above as follows.

1.Box
2.Tiger
3.Animal
4.Monkey

Do I need regular expression, and if yes what RE do I need?

if no how do i procceed in java.

Thanks in advance.

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  • 1
    Regular expressions are for matching, not sorting. You could use a RE to parse a string, but that's another matter, not directly related to the sorting issue.
    – outis
    Dec 8, 2011 at 7:26

4 Answers 4

3

A regex certainly seems like it would be a reasonable first step. Do you know about Comparator? It defines a method int compare(T one, T two) which has the usual int-as-comparison-result semantics. Once you have an instance of Comparator, you can pass it to sorting methods, such as Collections.sort.

So, one approach would be to write a Comparator<String> whose compare method uses a regex to extract the two Strings' number portions, and then does a numerical comparison. The problem with this is that you'll be doing that parsing each time you look at each String, which could get expensive.

An alternative would be to create a TreeMap<Integer,String>, and insert key-value pairs where the key is the parsed int and the value is the original String. Then you can just iterate over the value set, and they'll come out in key order. That would probably be the approach I'd take.

EDIT yytg brings up a good point, which is that for such a simple parse, you'd be just as good splitting on "\\." (with a limit of 2) and parsing the lefthand side. You could also use String.indexOf to find the dot and then String.substring to get the portion of the String to the left of the dot.

1
  • You should also consider what happens when there's a collision. For instance, if you have inputs 1.Box, 2.Tiger, 1.Animal. If you use the Collections.sort approach, the like-numbered strings will be grouped together, and in the same order they appeared originally (it's a stable sort). You can also sort them alphabetically iff the numbers are the same in the Comparator. In the TreeMap approach, the second string you see would kick out the first one, so you'd lose values. A TreeMap<Integer,List<String>> would fix that, at the cost of a tad extra complexity and object allocation.
    – yshavit
    Dec 8, 2011 at 7:35
1

The Comparator guy is correct, MalTec is close, but would tip over at "11.Liger" or nulls anywhere. THE UBER STRING SORTER IS...

public static void main( String[] args ) {
    List<String> theStrings = Arrays.asList( new String[] {
            "3.Animal",
            "1.Box",
            "4.Monkey",
            "2.Tiger",
            "11.Panzerkampfwagen",
            null,
            null,
            "127.0.0.1" } );
    Collections.sort( theStrings, new Comparator<String>() {
        Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile( "(\\d+).*" );

        @Override
        public int compare( String s1, String s2 ) {
            if ( s1 == null && s2 == null ) {
                return 0;
            } else if ( s1 != null && s2 == null ) {
                return -1;
            } else if ( s1 == null && s2 != null ) {
                return 1;
            } else {
                Matcher s1Matcher = pattern.matcher( s1 );
                Matcher s2Matcher = pattern.matcher( s2 );
                if ( !s1Matcher.matches() && !s2Matcher.matches() ) {
                    return s1.compareTo( s2 );
                } else if ( s1Matcher.matches() && !s2Matcher.matches() ) {
                    return -1;
                } else if ( !s1Matcher.matches() && s2Matcher.matches() ) {
                    return 1;
                } else {
                    int i1 = Integer.parseInt( s1Matcher.group( 1 ) );
                    int i2 = Integer.parseInt( s2Matcher.group( 1 ) );
                    return i1 - i2;
                }
            }
        }

    } );
    System.out.println( theStrings );
}

output is

[1.Box, 2.Tiger, 3.Animal, 4.Monkey, 11.Panzerkampfwagen, 127.0.0.1, null, null]
0
0

You may use a custom 'Comparator' - look here - no need for regex - you can split the string by the '.' and then take the left side and convert it to a number

0

if u have . form,at fixed for all the records, following code should work for u.. no need for regex.. And yeah hope this is not some tutorial u asked here

String[] source={"3.Animal","1.Box","4.Monkey","2.Tiger"};


Arrays.sort(source, new Comparator<String>() {
  @Override
  public int compare(String s1, String s2) {

      // to the start of the other, or else throwing an exception)
       if ((s1.indexOf('.') == -1) || (s2.indexOf('.') == -1)) { // both or neither
                return 0;
        }
        return s1.compareTo(s2);
   }
});


for(int i=0;i<source.length;i++){
    System.out.println("String - "+i+" : "+source[i]);
}
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  • @Odaiah :-) if it worked upvote and/or accept the answer so that others having similar issue can use this answer.
    – MalTec
    Dec 9, 2011 at 7:01

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