8

Here I want to reset all properties of Data to their original values, how I do that?

var Data = {
  prop1: false,
  prop2: true,
  prop3: null
}

Some code executes & sets Data.prop1 = "abc";

I never instantiated Data, is that a problem?

  • 1
    no but it is a problem to not have the = after Data. should be var Data = {}; – Kai Qing Dec 9 '11 at 2:41
  • Are you using a custom constructor to create the objects? If so, and if the defaults are primitives, you could put the defaults on the prototype, and then just delete the property on the instance to "return" it to its default. – RightSaidFred Dec 9 '11 at 2:44
  • Assuming the missing = is a typo, that code creates an actual object, not some kind of object template or "class", so you are instantiating an object (just not in a class-based-OO language sense of instantiating). – nnnnnn Dec 9 '11 at 3:14
  • whoops sorry yes the = is a typo! Thanks alot for your responses guys, I definitely misunderstood objects a wee bit thought it wasn't instantiated lol... – Baconbeastnz Dec 9 '11 at 23:48
8

Another way to do it would be this:

var Data = {
  prop1: false,
  prop2: true,
  prop3: null,

  // save initial values
  init: function() {
      var origValues = {};
      for (var prop in this) {
          if (this.hasOwnProperty(prop) && prop != "origValues") {
              origValues[prop] = this[prop];
          }
      }
      this.origValues = origValues;
  },
  // restore initial values
  reset: function() {
      for (var prop in this.origValues) {
          this[prop] = this.origValues[prop];
      }
  }
}

Then, when you use it, you call Data.init() in your initialization code to save the current values so they can be restored later with Data.reset(). This has the advantage that maintenance is easier. When you add or change a variable to your data structure, it is automatically incorporated into the reset function without you having to make any specific changes.

You can see it work here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/EtWfn/.

| improve this answer | |
14

Data is a dynamic object. You could just add a function that will reset all the values:

var Data = {
    prop1: false,
    prop2: true,
    prop3: null,
    reset: function () {
        this.prop1 = false;
        this.prop2 = true;
        this.prop3 = null;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
4

The simplest way that avoids having to duplicate all of the default values is to just use a more traditional constructor and instantiate your Data object from there. Then when you need to reset you can just throw away your old object and instantiate a new one.

Note: in the following code I've used the JS convention that functions intended to be used as object constructors start with an uppercase letter, and the variable referencing an instance starts with lowercase.

function Data() {
   this.prop1 = false;
   this.prop2 = true;
   this.prop3 = null;
}

var data = new Data();

data.prop1 = "abc"; // change some properties of data
data.prop3 = "something else";

data = new Data();  // "reset" by getting a new instance

If you don't like having to use "new" you could just write a non-constructor style function that returns an object:

function getData() {
   return {
      prop1: false,
      prop2: true,
      prop3: null
   };
}

var data = getData();
data.prop1 = "abc";

data = getData();  // reset

If for some reason you need the reset to keep the same actual instance rather than getting a new identical one then you will need to change the properties back one by one as per Frits van Campen's answer (you'd also need to add some code to delete any extra properties that were added along the way).

| improve this answer | |
2

A more elegant way of copying default values without losing the reference:

function createData() {
  return {
   prop1: 1,
   prop2: 2,
   prop3: [3]
   reset: function() {
    Object.assign(this, createData())
   }
 }
}

var data = createData()
data.prop1 = "not default anymore"
data.reset()
console.log(data.prop1) // 1

As mentioned earlier, you still need to remove properties that were added later if this is the case.

| improve this answer | |
0

try that:

var Data = {
  prop1: false,
  prop2: true,
  prop3: null
}

var DataOriginal = {
  prop1: false,
  prop2: true,
  prop3: null
}

Data.prop1 = 'abc';

Data = DataOriginal;
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This won't work if you need to reset it more than once, because Data = DataOriginal doesn't create any copies of objects, it simply leaves both variables pointed at the same object. – nnnnnn Dec 9 '11 at 2:53
0

Sounds simple enough. Would this work for you?

// after the Data structure is defined copy it to another variable
var OriginalData = Data;

// When you need to reset your Data to the Original values
Data = OriginalData;
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This doesn't work. It doesn't copy the Data object, it creates another reference to the same object. – nnnnnn Dec 9 '11 at 2:47
  • I don't recommend this. OriginalData and Data is referenced to the same object. It won't reset anything if OrigianlData is never referenced to another objects. Else would work. – W.T. Dec 9 '11 at 2:52

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