202

Is there a built in way to convert an integer in Ruby into its hexadecimal equivalent?

Something like the opposite of String#to_i:

"0A".to_i(16) #=>10

Like perhaps:

"0A".hex #=>10

I know how to roll my own, but it's probably more efficient to use a built in Ruby function.

313

You can give to_s a base other than 10:

10.to_s(16)  #=> "a"
  • 4
    That's the answer I was looking for but it isn't documented on the linked page str.to_s => str is specified as not accepting parameters and has "Returns the receiver." as the only documentation, but it seems to work – Matt Haughton Sep 17 '08 at 15:39
  • 2
    sorry about that copy paste mistake of course to_s on string doesn't take arguments but on Fixnum it does :) – Jean Sep 17 '08 at 15:46
  • 3
    Ah, I was looking under Integer for a .to_s method and couldn't find one. I'll look under Fixnum next time as well – Matt Haughton Sep 17 '08 at 16:11
  • 1
    Thanks for this answer. – jrhicks Jun 5 '10 at 0:10
  • Make sure the original number is an instance of Fixnum, Float will throw an exception. – lee Nov 16 '15 at 7:11
86

How about using %/sprintf:

i = 20
"%x" % i  #=> "14"
  • 14
    Thanks for showing this, I needed something that would get me a fixed length string prepended with '0'. ex: "%02X" % 10 #=> "0A" – Aaron Hinni Oct 31 '08 at 13:07
  • 41
    And for the other ruby newbies out there: "#%02x%02x%02x" % [255, 0, 10] #=> "#ff000a" - took me a bit to figure out how to send several args. – ANeves Mar 22 '11 at 19:08
  • 1
    This is an extremely awesome snippet of Ruby! – OzBandit Nov 9 '12 at 23:40
  • 4
    @TomD % is a String method that effectively provides a shorthand for sprintf formatting (they make the same internal calls). It's documented in the String class, see ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/String.html#method-i-25 – tardate Feb 13 '13 at 15:22
  • 2
    Less duplication: [255, 0, 10].map{|x| '%02x'%x}.join – Rok Kralj Aug 24 '13 at 19:43
70

To summarize:

p 10.to_s(16) #=> "a"
p "%x" % 10 #=> "a"
p "%02X" % 10 #=> "0A"
p sprintf("%02X", 10) #=> "0A"
p "#%02X%02X%02X" % [255, 0, 10] #=> "#FF000A"
  • Thanks for the number of digit formatting. Forgot about that :) – onetwopunch Feb 27 '15 at 18:42
  • saved my day. nice RGB conversion – huan son Apr 15 '16 at 11:59
13

Here's another approach:

sprintf("%02x", 10).upcase

see the documentation for sprintf here: http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Kernel.html#method-i-sprintf

3

Just in case you have a preference for how negative numbers are formatted:

p "%x" % -1   #=> "..f"
p -1.to_s(16) #=> "-1"

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