62

I have a quick question on CSS borders.

I need to create a solid color inset border. This is the bit of CSS I'm using:

border: 10px inset rgba(51,153,0,0.65);

Unfortunately that creates a 3D ridged border (ignore the squares and dark description box):

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/12147973/border-current.jpg

This is the goal:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/12147973/border-boal.jpg

Any ideas?

  • 3
    Border as defined in CSS is always added to the outside of the box, it will never collapse into the box and overlap content behind it. You'd have to add another box on top of it. – animuson Dec 9 '11 at 23:00

12 Answers 12

131

You could use box-shadow, possibly:

#something {
    background: transparent url(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RL5UH.png) 50% 50% no-repeat;
    min-width: 300px;
    min-height: 300px;
    box-shadow: inset 0 0 10px #0f0;
}

#something {
  background: transparent url(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RL5UH.png) 50% 50% no-repeat;
  min-width: 300px;
  min-height: 300px;
  box-shadow: inset 0 0 10px #0f0;
}
<div id="something"></div>

This has the advantage that it will overlay the background-image of the div, but it is, of course, blurred (as you'd expect from the box-shadow property). To build up the density of the shadow you can add additional shadows of course:

#something {
    background: transparent url(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RL5UH.png) 50% 50% no-repeat;
    min-width: 300px;
    min-height: 300px;
    box-shadow: inset 0 0 20px #0f0, inset 0 0 20px #0f0, inset 0 0 20px #0f0;
}

#something {
  background: transparent url(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RL5UH.png) 50% 50% no-repeat;
  min-width: 300px;
  min-height: 300px;
  box-shadow: inset 0 0 20px #0f0, inset 0 0 20px #0f0, inset 0 0 20px #0f0;
}
<div id="something"></div>


Edited because I realised that I'm an idiot, and forgot to offer the simplest solution first, which is using an otherwise-empty child element to apply the borders over the background:

#something {
  background: transparent url(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RL5UH.png) 50% 50% no-repeat;
  min-width: 300px;
  min-height: 300px;
  padding: 0;
  position: relative;
}
#something div {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  border: 10px solid rgba(0, 255, 0, 0.6);
}
<div id="something">
  <div></div>
</div>


Edited after @CoryDanielson's comment, below:

jsfiddle.net/dPcDu/2 you can add a 4th px parameter for the box-shadow that does the spread and will more easily reflect his images.

#something {
  background: transparent url(https://i.stack.imgur.com/RL5UH.png) 50% 50% no-repeat;
  min-width: 300px;
  min-height: 300px;
  box-shadow: inset 0 0 0 10px rgba(0, 255, 0, 0.5);
}
<div id="something"></div>

  • 8
    jsfiddle.net/dPcDu/2 you can add a 4th px parameter for the box-shadow that does the spread and will more easily reflect his images – Cory Danielson Dec 9 '11 at 23:16
  • 1
    @CoryDanielson: oooooooh..! I'd never realised that there was a fourth (presumably) 'width (but not blurred...)' option to the text-shadow property! Awesome! =) edited in, with thanks. – David Thomas Dec 9 '11 at 23:18
  • 1
    yeah a few of the tutorials on box-shadow do a terrible job documenting it... most of the 'coverage' on box-shadow is very inconsistent and poor... it got too popular for it's own good... before I learned about the 4th spread parameter, I would do 10 1px shadows... it was terrible. box-shadow and text-shadow should be more consistent... bleh. x,y,blur,spread – Cory Danielson Dec 9 '11 at 23:23
  • 1
    your empty div example is good stuff, i didn't know you could specify top, left, right, bottom all to 0 and it would work like that.. soooo stealing it... ugh, it doesn't work in ie :[ damn ie. – Cory Danielson Dec 9 '11 at 23:23
  • 1
    @CoryDanielson: the position: absolute; with all-zeroes works fine in IE, what didn't work was the background-color (IE doesn't understand the rgba() notation): see the latest Fiddle! – David Thomas Dec 10 '11 at 20:08
34

I would recomnend using box-sizing.

*{
  -webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
  -moz-box-sizing:border-box;
  -ms-box-sizing:border-box;
  box-sizing:border-box;
}

#bar{
  border: 10px solid green;
  }
  • 1
    As far as I can tell, this doesn't work for any of the box-sizing models. – podperson Feb 19 '13 at 16:12
  • Works for me. (comment padding because SO is childish) – Glenn Maynard Jun 5 '13 at 18:28
  • This worked for me in an instance where a box was divided between two parallell elements that each comprised half of the box and the width of the border was screwing up the inline displaying. – Mike Lyons Jun 18 '13 at 23:40
  • consider *{box-sizing: border-box;} for future projects. source - paulirish.com/2012/box-sizing-border-box-ftw – Stefan Hans Schonert Jun 19 '13 at 7:50
  • 2
    This isn't achieving what's needed. The asker is looking for border that will over lay. This solution just ensures when border is applied, overall the size not to increase. – user1275105 Aug 9 '16 at 18:27
12

To produce a border inset within an element the only solution I've found (and I've tried all the suggestions in this thread to no avail) is to use a pseudo-element such as :before

E.g.

.has-inset-border:before {
  content: "foo"; /* you need something or it will be invisible at least on Chrome */
  color: transparent;
  position: absolute;
  left: 10px;
  right: 10px;
  top: 10px;
  bottom: 10px;
  border: 4px dashed red;
}

The box-sizing property won't work, as the border always ends up outside everything.

The box-shadow options has the dual disadvantages of not really working and not being supported as widely (and costing more CPU cycles to render, if you care).

  • 1
    This works well on spans and such ; I saw that Facebook uses this technique too. Beware that in most browsers, :before and :after do not work on IMG elements though. – Louis Ameline Sep 13 '14 at 10:16
  • Just wanted to say nice job :) – Wes Duff Aug 18 '15 at 14:40
  • @Evan: good point (and img tags not having pseudo elements is one of those zillion gotchas) – podperson Aug 19 '15 at 6:39
  • 1
    Great solution - worked very well. This should be higher up the page! – Liran H Dec 11 '15 at 14:00
  • Thanks! Easily the best solution to this problem! – clayRay Jun 14 at 4:59
9

It's an old trick, but I still find the easiest way to do this is to use outline-offset with a negative value (example below uses -6px). Here's a fiddle of it—I've made the outer border red and the outline white to differentiate the two:

.outline-offset {
width:300px;
height:200px;
background:#333c4b;
border:2px solid red;
outline:2px #fff solid;
outline-offset:-6px;
}

<div class="outline-offset"></div>
4

If you want to make sure the border is on the inside of your element, you can use

box-sizing:border-box;

this will place the following border on the inside of the element:

border: 10px solid black;

(similar result you'd get using the additonal parameter inset on box-shadow, but instead this one is for the real border and you can still use your shadow for something else.)

Note to another answer above: as soon as you use any inset on box-shadow of a certain element, you are limited to a maximum of 2 box-shadows on that element and would require a wrapper div for further shadowing.

Both solutions should as well get you rid of the undesired 3D effects. Also note both solutions are stackable (see the example I've added in 2018)

.example-border {
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  border:40px solid blue;
  box-sizing:border-box;
  float:left;
}

.example-shadow {
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  float:left;
  margin-left:20px;
  box-shadow:0 0 0 40px green inset;
}

.example-combined {
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  float:left;
  margin-left:20px;
  border:20px solid orange;
  box-sizing:border-box;
  box-shadow:0 0 0 20px red inset;
}
<div class="example-border"></div>
<div class="example-shadow"></div>
<div class="example-combined"></div>

2

I don't know what you are comparing to.

But a super simple way to have a border look inset when compared to other non-bordered items is to add a border: ?px solid transparent; to whatever items do not have a border.

It will make the bordered item look inset.

http://jsfiddle.net/cmunns/cgrtd/

0

If box-sizing is not an option, another way to do this is just to make it a child of the sized element.

Demo

CSS

.box {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: inline-block;
  margin-right: 5px;
}
.border {
  border: 1px solid;
  display: block;
}
.medium { border-width: 10px; }
.large  { border-width: 25px; }


HTML

<div class="box">
  <div class="border small">A</div>
</div>
<div class="box">
  <div class="border medium">B</div>
</div>
<div class="box">
  <div class="border large">C</div>
</div>
0

You may use background-clip: border-box;

Example:

.example {
padding: 2em;
border: 10px solid rgba(51,153,0,0.65);
background-clip: border-box;
background-color: yellow;
}

<div class="example">Example with background-clip: border-box;</div>
0

So I was trying to have a border appear on hover but it moved the entire bottom bar of the main menu which didn't look all that good I fixed it with the following:

#top-menu .menu-item a:hover {
    border-bottom:4px solid #ec1c24;
    padding-bottom:14px !important;
}
#top-menu .menu-item a {
    padding-bottom:18px !important;
}

I hope this will help someone out there.

0

Simple SCSS solution with pseudo-elements

Live demo: https://codepen.io/vlasterx/pen/xaMgag

// Change border size here
$border-width: 5px;

.element-with-border {
	display: flex;
	height: 100px;
	width: 100%;
	position: relative;
	background-color: #f2f2f2;
	box-sizing: border-box;
	
	// Use pseudo-element to create inset border
	&:before {
		position: absolute;
		content: ' ';
		display: flex;
		border: $border-width solid black;
		left: 0;
		right: 0;
		top: 0;
		bottom: 0;
		border: $border-width solid black;
		// Important: We must deduct border size from width and height
		width: calc(100% - $border-width); 
		height: calc(100% - $border-width);
	}
}
<div class="element-with-border">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
</div>

0

You can do this:

.thing {
  border: 2px solid transparent;
}
.thing:hover {
  border: 2px solid green;
}
-2

I know this is three years old, but thought it might be helpful to someone.

The concept is to use the :after (or :before) selector to position a border within the parent element.

    .container{
        position:relative; /*Position must be set to something*/
    }

    .container:after{
        position:relative;
        top: 0;
        content:"";
        left:0;
        height: 100%; /*Set pixel height and width if not defined in parent element*/
        width: 100%; 

        -webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
        -moz-box-sizing:border-box;
        -ms-box-sizing:border-box;
        box-sizing:border-box;

        border:1px solid #000; /*set your border style*/

    }

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