So, I had an exam the other day, and one of the questions was something very similar to this:

We have a class called Square which holds a variable int side. How can we make it possible that cout << static_cast<int>(aSquare) <<endl; would print out the area of aSquare?

Is that even possible?

up vote 20 down vote accepted

It's possible to make that work, but not via overloading static_cast<>(). You do so by overloading the typecast operator:

class Square
{
public:
    Square(int side) : side(side) {}
    operator int() const { return side * side; } // overloaded typecast operator
private:
    int side;
};

// ...

// Compiler calls Square::operator int() to convert aSquare into an int
cout << static_cast<int>(aSquare) <<endl;

Beware that overloaded typecast operators more often than not tend to do more harm than good. They make lots of nonsensical implicit cast operations possible. When you read this code snippet below, do you think "a is going to get the area of s"?

Square aSquare;
int a = aSquare; // What the heck does this do?

I certainly don't. This makes way more sense and is much more readable:

Square aSquare;
int a = aSquare.GetArea();

Not to mention that typically you want to be able to access other information about Square, like GetSide() or GetApothem() or GetPerimeter() or whatever. operator int() obviously can return only one int, and you can't have multiple operator int()s as members of a class.

Here's another situation where the operator int() makes code that compiles yet makes no sense whatsoever:

Square s;
if(s > 42) {} // Huh?!

What does it mean for a Square to be greater than 42? It's nonsense, but with the operator int() the code above will compile as Shape is now convertible to an int which can be compared to another int with a value 4.

So don't write typecast operators like that. In fact if you're overloading typecast operators you may want to think twice about what you're doing. There's actually only a few cases where overloading the typecast operator is useful in modern C++ (e.g. the safe bool idiom).

  • +1: a Square class could use several more methods, e.g. int GetSideLength() const, int GetPerimeter() const, and it is for the purpose of disambiguation that a named method should be used for GetArea(). – rwong Dec 10 '11 at 18:01
  • Thanks for the elaborate answer. – Radix Dec 10 '11 at 18:31
  • 2
    @In silico: With c++11 the safe bool idiom is no longer necessary, since c++11 supports the keyword explicit for conversion operators. – smerlin Dec 10 '11 at 18:55
  • It seems that everyone considers overriding typecasts to be bad form because it's confusing, and solves an inherently solved problem. If you specify explicit to abate confusion, then the only problem with this style is that it appears to be useless. Are there ANY use cases where typecasting is simply better? That is, will this formula ever fail: Instead of newType a = static_cast<newType>(oldObj) we can simply use newType a = oldObj.convertTo_NewType() – Ari Sweedler Jul 11 at 17:50

You can overload the cast operator:

struct square {
  operator int() const {
    return (side * side);
  }
  int side;
};

The only problem is that it will be used implicitly, and casting doesn't make much sense here. You also can't distinguish between the different types of casts (static_cast, c-style, etc)

This is the preferred way to do things:

struct square {
  int get_area() const {
    return (side * side);
  }
  int side;
}

If you must use a cast, use C++11 feature and mark it explicit. This prevents implicit casting mistakes.

You could provide a conversion operator for the Square class:

class Square 
{
public:
    operator int()
    {
        return side * side;
    }
private:
    int side;
};
  • it should return the area, not the side – Dani Dec 10 '11 at 17:57
  • 2
    Holds true for very small instances of square. – Martin York Dec 10 '11 at 17:57
  • 2
    @Dani: I think you were missing the point. I am sure the OP knows how to calculate area. The question correctly answered how to get an int from square object which is the technical part of the question. – Martin York Dec 10 '11 at 18:05

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