26

I have 8 bool variables, and I want to "merge" them into a byte.

Is there an easy/preferred method to do this?

How about the other way around, decoding a byte into 8 separate boolean values?

I come in assuming it's not an unreasonable question, but since I couldn't find relevant documentation via Google, it's probably another one of those "nonono all your intuition is wrong" cases.

5
  • I am not sure what you mean exactly. A bool(ean) datatype in c++ is one byte, how do you want to convert a byte into byte ? – ScarletAmaranth Dec 11 '11 at 0:56
  • 1
    There is no way to pack 8 bool variables into one byte. There is a way packing 8 logical true/false states in a single byte using Bitmasking. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation – ScarletAmaranth Dec 11 '11 at 0:58
  • @ScarletAmaranth That should be an answer. – weltraumpirat Dec 11 '11 at 0:59
  • 1
    @weltraumpirat I was not sure what exactly the question was. – ScarletAmaranth Dec 11 '11 at 1:01
  • 3
    I just knew people were going to make this question harder than it is. Well, it's my fault for not knowing booleans are more than 1 bit in size. – xcel Dec 11 '11 at 1:33
26

The hard way:

unsigned char ToByte(bool b[8])
{
    unsigned char c = 0;
    for (int i=0; i < 8; ++i)
        if (b[i])
            c |= 1 << i;
    return c;
}

And:

void FromByte(unsigned char c, bool b[8])
{
    for (int i=0; i < 8; ++i)
        b[i] = (c & (1<<i)) != 0;
}

Or the cool way:

struct Bits
{
    unsigned b0:1, b1:1, b2:1, b3:1, b4:1, b5:1, b6:1, b7:1;
};
union CBits
{
    Bits bits;
    unsigned char byte;
};

Then you can assign to one member of the union and read from another. But note that the order of the bits in Bits is implementation defined.

Note that reading one union member after writing another is well-defined in ISO C99, and as an extension in several major C++ implementations (including MSVC and GNU-compatible C++ compilers), but is Undefined Behaviour in ISO C++. memcpy or C++20 std::bit_cast are the safe ways to type-pun in portable C++.

(Also, the bit-order of bitfields within a char is implementation defined, as is possible padding between bitfield members.)

10
  • 1
    @Juicy Not with the union directly, if you need to loop you use <<. But you can mix both solitions. – rodrigo Sep 24 '15 at 23:13
  • 2
    @ibug I think type-punning through the union is undefined behavior in C++, regehr seems to say so here: blog.regehr.org/archives/959 I don't think the question of trap-representations is relevant. It's about the strict aliasing rule. The "cool" way shown above would be against coding standards at my company at least. – Chris Beck Jan 1 '18 at 1:46
  • 1
    @iBug it's UB to access a member of a union that wasn't last assigned to. – UKMonkey Jun 25 '18 at 14:41
  • 7
    Type punning through unions is UB; please remove that or explicitly state that this is an extension and which compilers provide it. – Baum mit Augen Jun 25 '18 at 14:42
  • 3
    This is definitively UB. – YSC Jun 25 '18 at 14:42
12

You might want to look into std::bitset. It allows you to compactly store booleans as bits, with all of the operators you would expect.

No point fooling around with bit-flipping and whatnot when you can abstract away.

1
8

The cool way (using the multiplication technique)

inline uint8_t pack8bools(bool* a)
{
    uint64_t t;
    memcpy(&t, a, sizeof t); // t = *((uint64_t*)a) without aliasing
    return 0x8040201008040201*t >> 56;
}

void unpack8bools(uint8_t b, bool* a)
{
    auto MAGIC = 0x8040201008040201ULL;
    auto MASK  = 0x8080808080808080ULL;
    uint64_t t = ((MAGIC*b) & MASK) >> 7;
    memcpy(a, &t, sizeof t); // *(uint64_t*)a = t;
}

Assuming sizeof(bool) == 1

Of course you may need to make sure that the bool array is correctly 8-byte aligned to avoid performance shoot down and/or UB


How they work

Suppose we have 8 bools b[0] to b[7] whose least significant bits are named a-h respectively that we want to pack into a single byte. Treating those 8 consecutive bools as one 64-bit word and load them we'll get the bits in reversed order in a little-endian machine. Now we'll do a multiplication (here dots are zero bits)

  |  b7  ||  b6  ||  b4  ||  b4  ||  b3  ||  b2  ||  b1  ||  b0  |
  .......h.......g.......f.......e.......d.......c.......b.......a
× 1000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001
  ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
  ↑......h.↑.....g..↑....f...↑...e....↑..d.....↑.c......↑b.......a
  ↑.....g..↑....f...↑...e....↑..d.....↑.c......↑b.......a
  ↑....f...↑...e....↑..d.....↑.c......↑b.......a
+ ↑...e....↑..d.....↑.c......↑b.......a
  ↑..d.....↑.c......↑b.......a
  ↑.c......↑b.......a
  ↑b.......a
  a       
  ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
= abcdefghxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

The arrows are added so it's easier to see the position of the set bits in the magic number. At this point 8 least significant bits has been put in the top byte, we'll just need to mask the remaining bits out

So the magic number for packing would be 0b1000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001 or 0x8040201008040201. If you're on a big endian machine you'll need to use the magic number 0x0102040810204080 which is calculated in a similar manner

For unpacking we can do a similar multiplication

  |  b7  ||  b6  ||  b4  ||  b4  ||  b3  ||  b2  ||  b1  ||  b0  |
                                                          abcdefgh
× 1000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001000000001
  ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
= h0abcdefgh0abcdefgh0abcdefgh0abcdefgh0abcdefgh0abcdefgh0abcdefgh
& 1000000010000000100000001000000010000000100000001000000010000000
  ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
= h0000000g0000000f0000000e0000000d0000000c0000000b0000000a0000000

After multiplying we have the needed bits at the most significant positions, so we need to mask out irrelevant bits and shift the remaining ones to the least significant positions. The output will be the bytes contain a to h in little endian.


The efficient way

On newer x86 CPUs with BMI2 there are PEXT and PDEP instructions for this purpose. The pack8bools function above can be replaced with

_pext_u64(*((uint64_t*)a), 0x0101010101010101ULL);

And the unpack8bools function can be implemented as

_pdep_u64(b, 0x0101010101010101ULL);

Unfortunately those instructions are very slow on AMD so you may need to compare with the multiplication method above to see which is better

13
  • 1
    to_ullong and the unsigned long long constructor can't use PEXT and PDEP because they just copy the unsigned long long value directly to/from the internal array. The bits in bitset are stored as bits in the array and not one bit per byte. So to_ullong gives you 64 bits and not 8 – phuclv Jun 11 '19 at 10:31
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    @SamuelLi that's probably due to strict aliasing. Try -fno-strict-aliasing or a union. Or just change from bool to char because char* can alias other types – phuclv Mar 11 '20 at 16:20
  • 1
    @SamuelLi: That's because using uint64_t* to read a char[] object violates strict-aliasing. ISO C only allows it the other way around: using char * to read an object that was originally a uint64_t. If the only access to the char object is through a char*, you're fine, but if there's any use of an automatic or static storage char[], you have UB. This answer should really use memcpy or C++20 std::bitcast, or GNU C typedef uint64_t unaligned_aliasing_u64 __attribute__((aligned(1), may_alias)); to do the type-punning; pointer-casting is never safe. – Peter Cordes Oct 29 '20 at 3:24
  • 1
    @SamuelLi: In C++, automatic storage = non-static locals; static storage = globals and static-anything. My point was that if there's some way to access the array object itself, especially as part of a struct, then it's possible to have a real problem with strict-aliasing. If the "array" is just how you're treating some memory you got from new or malloc, all the char accesses to it are going to be via char* anyway, and thus aliasing-safe. But if you have a real char array[8] variable declaration somewhere, access to it might not be through a char*. – Peter Cordes Nov 1 '20 at 4:50
  • 1
    @SamuelLi: Although I just realized you can have a problem even with dynamic storage. If you have struct foo{ int a; char b[8];}; then you can do struct assignment of the whole struct even via pointers to it, like foo *p=..., *q=...; and *p = *q. Access to char b[8] is not through a char* in that case, so a compiler could certainly assume that some uint64_t* load or store was unrelated to it. (You might actually need this struct thing for UB to actually happen, or at least to be a problem in practice, not just a char arr[8] local var: [] access works by decay to char*) – Peter Cordes Nov 1 '20 at 4:55
5
#include <stdint.h>   // to get the uint8_t type

uint8_t GetByteFromBools(const bool eightBools[8])
{
   uint8_t ret = 0;
   for (int i=0; i<8; i++) if (eightBools[i] == true) ret |= (1<<i);
   return ret;
}

void DecodeByteIntoEightBools(uint8_t theByte, bool eightBools[8])
{
   for (int i=0; i<8; i++) eightBools[i] = ((theByte & (1<<i)) != 0);
}
6
  • 7
    Posting a code solution without any explanation might help OP, but does not provide good value to other users. You should consider adding comments and/or explain what you did. – weltraumpirat Dec 11 '11 at 1:02
  • +1 for using uint8_t. Exactly what the type was meant for, when you need exactly 8 bits. – Lalaland Dec 11 '11 at 1:02
  • I hope you realize that eightBools[i] is a bool and checking it with == true you can also just write (eightBools[i] == true) == true or ((eightBools[i] == true) == true) == true, but where to stop? And yes, that's worth not up-voting the answer. – Christian Rau Dec 11 '11 at 1:06
  • weltraumpirat I think the code is straightforward enough that a separate explanation would be redundant and only get in the way. Christian I accept your criticism -- I wouldn't write it like that in my own code -- but I wrote it that way here to make the intent of the code clearer. You may keep your up-vote, I don't want it ;) – Jeremy Friesner Dec 11 '11 at 1:16
  • 3
    @JeremyFriesner For someone who is new to bitmasks, your code isn't straightforward, not one bit (pun intended). I stand by my earlier comment. – weltraumpirat Dec 11 '11 at 10:39
2
bool a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h;
//do stuff
char y= a<<7 | b<<6 | c<<5 | d<<4 | e <<3 | f<<2 | g<<1 | h;//merge

although you are probably better off using a bitset

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/bitset/bitset/

2
  • 2
    Isn't that too much hardcoding? – Fabián Heredia Montiel Dec 11 '11 at 1:03
  • 2
    Depends, I wouldn't write it, but if you want to merge 8 separate non contiguous bools then it is the way to do it. – 111111 Dec 11 '11 at 1:06
2

I'd like to note that type punning through unions is UB in C++ (as rodrigo does in his answer. The safest way to do that is memcpy()

struct Bits
{
    unsigned b0:1, b1:1, b2:1, b3:1, b4:1, b5:1, b6:1, b7:1;
};

unsigned char toByte(Bits b){
    unsigned char ret;
    memcpy(&ret, &b, 1);
    return ret;
}

As others have said, the compiler is smart enough to optimize out memcpy().

BTW, this is the way that Boost does type punning.

2
  • @Michi Is this question C++? – iBug Jan 7 '19 at 16:34
  • 1
    Though I like the simplicity of this solution, but it looks like the memory layout of bit fields are compiler dependent link. That is undesired for some use cases... – Samuel Li Mar 5 '20 at 5:31
0

There is no way to pack 8 bool variables into one byte. There is a way packing 8 logical true/false states in a single byte using Bitmasking.

2
  • You can pack the values of 8 bools into one byte. Of course they're no longer separate C++ bool objects, but all 8 values are all there within the bits of one char or uint8_t. This answer seems unhelpful and pedantic when the desired behaviour was clear. – Peter Cordes Oct 29 '20 at 3:34
  • I couldn't read minds as to determine what the intent was, given my crystal ball was broken at the time of answering. I answered the question asked. – ScarletAmaranth Nov 4 '20 at 0:23
0

You would use the bitwise shift operation and casting to archive it. a function could work like this:

unsigned char toByte(bool *bools)
{
    unsigned char byte = \0;
    for(int i = 0; i < 8; ++i) byte |= ((unsigned char) bools[i]) << i;
    return byte;
}

Thanks Christian Rau for the correction s!

10
  • 1
    I (pst) don't know any C++ ... so if someone could clarify why this question was downvoted, much appreciated! – user166390 Dec 11 '11 at 1:00
  • 1
    Can the people downvoting actually tell me what I am doing wrong? I am naive to programming. :/ – Fabián Heredia Montiel Dec 11 '11 at 1:00
  • 2
    And the reason you use a short (which may be 1 byte, but will most probably be 2) and not just a char (which is guaranteed to be 1 byte) is...? And also you should use unsigned types and initialize byte properly. Fix those and the answer is much more likely to be correct. But I'm not the down-voter, not yet. – Christian Rau Dec 11 '11 at 1:01
  • Oh true, I am making the edit now, thanks for pointing it out. – Fabián Heredia Montiel Dec 11 '11 at 1:03
  • 1
    unsigned char byte = \0; is invalid. Either use 0 or '\0' – phuclv Aug 20 '18 at 9:40

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