2

Look at this csharp code, and see if you can tell why I need to exit the loop after I found and deleted an item from the list. The idea is to go through a node's list of neighbors, and see if a Node n exists there, then delete that neighbor:

    internal void RemoveDirected(Node n)
    {
        foreach (EdgeToNeighbor etn in this.Neighbors)
        {
            if (etn.Neighbor.Key == n.Key)
            {
                RemoveDirected(etn);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    internal void RemoveDirected(EdgeToNeighbor e)
    {
        Neighbors.Remove(e);
    }

. . .

    // Removes EdgeToNeighbor instance from AdjacencyList
    protected internal virtual void Remove(EdgeToNeighbor e)
    {
        base.InnerList.Remove(e);
    }

Notice how I have a "break" after the RemoveDirected call in the first method. I've found that if I didn't exit after the RemoveDirected it would go on forever in the foreach loop. I suppose it must have something to do with the way foreach works. If you modify the list that foreach is working on, it gets confuse and loops forever.

Have you seen this type of thing, and what are other options to use rather than using break? Of course, I could place the node that I've found in a local variable, then break from the loop, and delete it outside of the loop. But I was thinking, may be there are better ways to do this in csharp.

  • Thank you all for providing your feedback, it is greatly appreciate it. One request I like to make is that, please provide code for the solution your are suggesting. A code example will definitely make it a lot more clear what you are recommending. Thanks in advance. – Fo Rum Dec 11 '11 at 16:31
8

When you iterate a .NET collection using its iterator, you must not modify that collection. If you do, you are asking for trouble.

You should defer the deletion instead of deleting right in the foreach loop. For example, you can collect everything you need to delete in a list, and then delete it outside of foreach.

var toDelete = this.Neighbors.Where(etn => etn.Neighbor.Key == n.Key).ToList();
foreach (var e in toDelete) {
    Neighbors.Remove(e);
}
  • This seems silly ... to Where to just make a list of things to Remove :P~ – user166390 Dec 11 '11 at 4:21
  • @pst Why? This code communicates the intention to anyone reading it, because it reads almost like plain English. To me, this counts for much more than the CPU cycles you could potentially save by doing something optimized. – dasblinkenlight Dec 11 '11 at 4:25
  • It seems silly because a Where is a filter. If there was other side-effecting code involved then yes, sometimes I use that approach... but not in a case like this. (I guess I assume that Neighbors is not shared, but that's a bigger assumption almost always valid in my code.) – user166390 Dec 11 '11 at 4:46
1

You definitely don't want to use an iterator if you are removing items. One option is to change it to downward counting loop:

    for (int nI = this.Neighbors.Count; nI >= 0; nI--)
    {
        var etn = this.Neighbors[nI]; 
        if (etn.Neighbor.Key == n.Key)
        {
            RemoveDirected(n);
        }
    }

You could also collect the keys or items to be deleted in a collection within the loop and then perform the deletion once you have completed your iteration.

However, if you are only removing a single item and the items in the collection are keyed somehow, then you shouldn't actually need any loop. Just test the existence of the key or item in the collection and, if it is there, just remove it.

0

You could get the number of nodes and then check and delete from highest to lowest in a for loop that way you avoid looking for an item that no longer exists.

  • I would appreciate it greatly if you can provide an example of the code you're suggesting. – Fo Rum Dec 11 '11 at 20:25
  • @FoRum check competent_tech's answer below. – Steve Robillard Dec 11 '11 at 21:18

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