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Say I have several .otf and .dfont font files that are used in PSD for web site design. Now I need to add those fonts into the HTML/CSS code. I know @font feature of CSS3 which does that. But I am sure that it would not work for older browsers? So what is the cross browser way of doing that?

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  • Please consider doing some research before coming to Stack Overflow to ask a question.
    – Marcin
    Dec 11, 2011 at 12:11
  • That is a very good point Marcin. Thanks for your delicate revision.
    – Karine
    Dec 11, 2011 at 12:16

4 Answers 4

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Firstly, websites need not look alike in all the browsers (http://dowebsitesneedtolookexactlythesameineverybrowser.com/). It is perfectly fine to not display these fonts in the older browsers. Just provide a fallback as @ThiefMaster mentioned.

In case , you insist on using the same fonts even for older browsers, you might have to rely on Cufon (http://cufon.shoqolate.com) for cross browser compatibility. Use a feature detection (using Modernizr) and conditionally load the Cufon library. Be warned that using Cufon on body text would make the page load slower.

PS: All IE versions support web font embedding.

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    What is fallback? What you mean by saying provide fallback? Like to give similar fonts instead of the exact one??
    – Karine
    Dec 11, 2011 at 11:31
  • Yes. In your style rule, just provide a similar font which can be displayed if the browser doesn't support @font-face
    – apnerve
    Dec 11, 2011 at 11:35
  • What is the advantage of cufon solution vs ThiefMaster's solution? This is very important.
    – Karine
    Dec 11, 2011 at 19:40
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    Using cufon, you display the same font for browsers that don't support @font-face while, ThiefMaster's solution displays similar-looking font for unsupported browsers.
    – apnerve
    Dec 12, 2011 at 20:44
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You can use http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator to create a most-compatible CSS containing the various @font-face declarations.

Obviously there will be some old browsers not supporting it - for those you should specify a regular font when using the custom font, e.g. like this:

p { font-family: "your font", sans-serif; }
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I'm using FontSquirrel's @font-face kit generator, and it works pretty well in my opinion.

Check it out at http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator

Shai

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  • This is what he already knows. He needs a solution for older browsers.
    – apnerve
    Dec 11, 2011 at 11:18
  • How did you get to that? I've offered the most compatible cross-browser font solutions available. The fact you know about the @font tag doens't mean you know how to get a fully compatibly kit with all the various font-formats. Of course that for older browser (IE6 and friends) you have to always "fall back" to a standard fonts, but theres not much to do about that. Dec 11, 2011 at 11:20
  • Here there are several problems: .dfont file was to big for this site more then 3Mb. There was a problem with number of font I can opload (only 3) and, finally, it had a problem with Gotham-Black.otf font. It is blocklisted by the generator :(((((((
    – Karine
    Dec 11, 2011 at 11:23
  • @ShaiMishali I assumed he already knew about that. Sorry, my bad. BTW, IE6 and friends DO support web font embedding. Even IE4.
    – apnerve
    Dec 11, 2011 at 11:33
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FontSquirrel didn't work for me. http://transfonter.org/, on the other hand, was perfect in order to transform DFONT to TTF.

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