31

I have a C# annotation which is :

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method)]
public class OperationInfo : System.Attribute {
    public enum VisibilityType {
        GLOBAL,
        LOCAL,
        PRIVATE
    }
    public VisibilityType Visibility { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public Func<List<string>, List<string>> Func;

    public OperationInfo(VisibilityType visibility, string title, Func<List<string>, List<string>> function) {
        Visibility = visibility;
        Title = title;
        Func = function;
    }
}

As you can see, there is a property which is a Func and I want to call it dynamically. Basically, I'd like to parse all the methods which have this annotation and then call the Func binded to the annotation.

I'd like to use it like this (this is a simple example of an echo function, which gets a string and return the same string):

[OperationInfo(OperationInfo.VisibilityType.GLOBAL, "echo", IDoEcho)]
    public static string DoEcho(string a)
    {
        return a;
    }

    [OperationInfo(OperationInfo.VisibilityType.PRIVATE, null, null)]
    public static List<string> IDoEcho(List<string> param) {
        return new List<string>() { DoEcho(param[0]) };
    }

I've got no error in my Annotation class but when it comes to regenerate the entire solution, each time I declare a method with the annotation I've got an error which tells me that I must use literals in an annotation.

I understand there is limitations, but is there any way I can avoid this problem? I know I can use a string instead of a Func, and look dynamically for the function whose name is the same as the string, but I would like not to do so.

Thanks for helping :)

1
  • 1
    It might not look pretty, but you will often find strings as arguments to attributes because the values must be known at compile time.
    – danludwig
    Commented Dec 11, 2011 at 11:44

3 Answers 3

15

I don't think it is possible, c# only allows you to use Attributes with constant values only.

One way of doing this would be to create a class instead of a func, and then you pass the type of that class into the attribute. You'd then need to instantiate it with reflection and execute a method in it.

So an example would be:

public interface IDoStuff
{
    IList<string> Execute();
}

then your attribute would take a type instead of a Func

public OperationInfo(VisibilityType v, string title, Type type)
{
   ///...
}

you then would create a class that implements your interface and pass it into the attribute. Although this would mean that (at least initially, and without knowing your problem) you will need to create a new class every time you want to return different results.

13

From the C# spec:

17.1.3 Attribute parameter types

The types of positional and named parameters for an attribute class are limited to the attribute parameter types, which are:

· One of the following types: bool, byte, char, double, float, int, long, sbyte, short, string, uint, ulong, ushort.

· The type object.

· The type System.Type.

· An enum type, provided it has public accessibility and the types in which it is nested (if any) also have public accessibility (§17.2).

· Single-dimensional arrays of the above types.

1

So, I was working on some custom authentication today and came across this issue myself, so I figured it might help to add my solution in case this helps anyone. What I was specifically aiming to do was to have three Func<,> structured as:

Func<HttpContext, T?> First;
Func<T?, T?> Second;
Func<T?, bool> Third;

Where the first function extracts (for example) various request headers from the context, the second processes those headers through a security mechanism and then the third tests the output of the second function for validity.

My solution to the problem was to pass two type parameters to the attribute class:

AuthorizationAttribute<T, Tobj> : Attribute, IAuthorizationFilter where T : class, IAuthorisationTransformers<Tobj>, new() 
{     
    Func<HttpContext, T?> First;
    Func<T?, T?> Second;
    Func<T?, bool> Third; 

    public AuthorizationAttribute()
    {
        T Transformers = new T();
        First = Transformers.First;
        Second = Transformers.Second;
        Third = Transformers.Third; 
    }

}

Create an interface which contains the methods that the Attribute requires:

public interface IAuthorisationTransformers<T>
{
    public T? First(HttpContext context);

    public T? Second(T? WorkingValue);

    public bool Third(T? WorkingValue);
}

And then create a new concrete implementation of the interface from within my production code:

internal sealed class ControllerTransformers : IAuthorisationTransformers<string>
{
    public string? First(HttpContext context)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public string? Second(string? WorkingValue)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public bool Third(string? WorkingValue)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

This effectively allows me to have different authorisation procedures for each controller, using the same attribute but passing a different class type.

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