168

How do I add two strings?

I tried name = "derp" + "herp";, but I got an error:

Expression must have integral or enum type

0

12 Answers 12

207

C does not have the support for strings that some other languages have. A string in C is just a pointer to an array of char that is terminated by the first null character. There is no string concatenation operator in C.

Use strcat to concatenate two strings. You could use the following function to do it:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char* concat(const char *s1, const char *s2)
{
    char *result = malloc(strlen(s1) + strlen(s2) + 1); // +1 for the null-terminator
    // in real code you would check for errors in malloc here
    strcpy(result, s1);
    strcat(result, s2);
    return result;
}

This is not the fastest way to do this, but you shouldn't be worrying about that now. Note that the function returns a block of heap allocated memory to the caller and passes on ownership of that memory. It is the responsibility of the caller to free the memory when it is no longer needed.

Call the function like this:

char* s = concat("derp", "herp");
// do things with s
free(s); // deallocate the string

If you did happen to be bothered by performance then you would want to avoid repeatedly scanning the input buffers looking for the null-terminator.

char* concat(const char *s1, const char *s2)
{
    const size_t len1 = strlen(s1);
    const size_t len2 = strlen(s2);
    char *result = malloc(len1 + len2 + 1); // +1 for the null-terminator
    // in real code you would check for errors in malloc here
    memcpy(result, s1, len1);
    memcpy(result + len1, s2, len2 + 1); // +1 to copy the null-terminator
    return result;
}

If you are planning to do a lot of work with strings then you may be better off using a different language that has first class support for strings.

2
  • 1
    Small bit: code could do the copy of the first part of the string last and then return memcpy(result, s1, len1);. Although a micro-optimization or at least a bit of code golfing, such potential improvements on basic string operations can have value given their high use. Nov 9, 2016 at 19:29
  • 5
    Small performance improvement of the first version using stpcpy, which returns a pointer to the end of the first string: strcpy(stpcpy(result, s1), s2);
    – Daniel
    May 29, 2020 at 8:26
20
#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    char name[] =  "derp" "herp";
    printf("\"%s\"\n", name);//"derpherp"
    return 0;
}
1
  • 1
    It also works for macros in c, which is worth noting
    – Abe Fehr
    Dec 3, 2013 at 17:00
19

David Heffernan explained the issue in his answer, and I wrote the improved code. See below.

A generic function

We can write a useful variadic function to concatenate any number of strings:

#include <stdlib.h>       // calloc
#include <stdarg.h>       // va_*
#include <string.h>       // strlen, strcpy

char* concat(int count, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    int i;

    // Find required length to store merged string
    int len = 1; // room for NULL
    va_start(ap, count);
    for(i=0 ; i<count ; i++)
        len += strlen(va_arg(ap, char*));
    va_end(ap);

    // Allocate memory to concat strings
    char *merged = calloc(sizeof(char),len);
    int null_pos = 0;

    // Actually concatenate strings
    va_start(ap, count);
    for(i=0 ; i<count ; i++)
    {
        char *s = va_arg(ap, char*);
        strcpy(merged+null_pos, s);
        null_pos += strlen(s);
    }
    va_end(ap);

    return merged;
}

Usage

#include <stdio.h>        // printf

void println(char *line)
{
    printf("%s\n", line);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char *str;

    str = concat(0);             println(str); free(str);
    str = concat(1,"a");         println(str); free(str);
    str = concat(2,"a","b");     println(str); free(str);
    str = concat(3,"a","b","c"); println(str); free(str);

    return 0;
}

Output:

  // Empty line
a
ab
abc

Clean-up

Note that you should free up the allocated memory when it becomes unneeded to avoid memory leaks:

char *str = concat(2,"a","b");
println(str);
free(str);
2
  • 4
    The arguments to calloc are backward. They should be count then size. You get away with it here thanks to the multiplicative identity, since sizeof(char) is defined to be 1.
    – Andy
    Nov 3, 2014 at 8:51
  • Consider int len --> size_t len as size_t is the right type for "size" code. Also // room for NULL --> // room for null character NULL implies the null pointer. Nov 9, 2016 at 19:36
14

I'll assume you need it for one-off things. I'll assume you're a PC developer.

Use the Stack, Luke. Use it everywhere. Don't use malloc / free for small allocations, ever.

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define STR_SIZE 10000

int main()
{
  char s1[] = "oppa";
  char s2[] = "gangnam";
  char s3[] = "style";

  {
    char result[STR_SIZE] = {0};
    snprintf(result, sizeof(result), "%s %s %s", s1, s2, s3);
    printf("%s\n", result);
  }
}

If 10 KB per string won't be enough, add a zero to the size and don't bother, - they'll release their stack memory at the end of the scopes anyway.

1
  • 1
    This would be more clearly expressed as snprintf(result, sizeof result, "%s %s %s", s1, s2, s3);
    – M.M
    Nov 19, 2015 at 4:14
8

You should use strcat, or better, strncat. Google it (the keyword is "concatenating").

1
  • 8
    Beware: strncat() is a fiendishly difficult function to use correctly. Quickly, without looking at the manual, what length do you specify to strncat()? If you said "the length of the buffer", you just demonstrated my point nicely. It has a counter-intuitive interface and when you have enough data to use it safely, you don't need to use the function in the first place — there are other, quicker and more efficient alternatives (such as strcpy() or memmove()) that could be used instead. Pretty much whatever the question of 'what should I use', strncat() is not the answer. Dec 2, 2015 at 3:00
6

You cannot add string literals like that in C. You have to create a buffer of size of string literal one + string literal two + a byte for null termination character and copy the corresponding literals to that buffer and also make sure that it is null terminated. Or you can use library functions like strcat.

4

Concatenate Strings

Concatenating any two strings in C can be done in atleast 3 ways :-

1) By copying string 2 to the end of string 1

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAX 100
int main()
{
  char str1[MAX],str2[MAX];
  int i,j=0;
  printf("Input string 1: ");
  gets(str1);
  printf("\nInput string 2: ");
  gets(str2);
  for(i=strlen(str1);str2[j]!='\0';i++)  //Copying string 2 to the end of string 1
  {
     str1[i]=str2[j];
     j++;
  }
  str1[i]='\0';
  printf("\nConcatenated string: ");
  puts(str1);
  return 0;
}

2) By copying string 1 and string 2 to string 3

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAX 100
int main()
{
  char str1[MAX],str2[MAX],str3[MAX];
  int i,j=0,count=0;
  printf("Input string 1: ");
  gets(str1);
  printf("\nInput string 2: ");
  gets(str2);
  for(i=0;str1[i]!='\0';i++)          //Copying string 1 to string 3
  {
    str3[i]=str1[i];
    count++;
  }
  for(i=count;str2[j]!='\0';i++)     //Copying string 2 to the end of string 3
  {
    str3[i]=str2[j];
    j++;
  }
  str3[i]='\0';
  printf("\nConcatenated string : ");
  puts(str3);
  return 0;
}

3) By using strcat() function

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAX 100
int main()
{
  char str1[MAX],str2[MAX];
  printf("Input string 1: ");
  gets(str1);
  printf("\nInput string 2: ");
  gets(str2);
  strcat(str1,str2);                    //strcat() function
  printf("\nConcatenated string : ");
  puts(str1);
  return 0;
}
3

Without GNU extension:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void) {
    const char str1[] = "First";
    const char str2[] = "Second";
    char *res;

    res = malloc(strlen(str1) + strlen(str2) + 1);
    if (!res) {
        fprintf(stderr, "malloc() failed: insufficient memory!\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    strcpy(res, str1);
    strcat(res, str2);

    printf("Result: '%s'\n", res);
    free(res);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Alternatively with GNU extension:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void) {
    const char str1[] = "First";
    const char str2[] = "Second";
    char *res;

    if (-1 == asprintf(&res, "%s%s", str1, str2)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "asprintf() failed: insufficient memory!\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    printf("Result: '%s'\n", res);
    free(res);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

See malloc, free and asprintf for more details.

2
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   int a,l;
   char str[50],str1[50],str3[100];
   printf("\nEnter a string: ");
   scanf("%s",str);
   str3[0]='\0';
   printf("\nEnter the string which you want to concat with string one: ");
   scanf("%s",str1);
   strcat(str3,str);
   strcat(str3,str1);
   printf("\nThe string is %s\n",str3);
}
1

using memcpy

char *str1="hello";
char *str2=" world";
char *str3;

str3=(char *) malloc (11 *sizeof(char));
memcpy(str3,str1,5);
memcpy(str3+strlen(str1),str2,6);

printf("%s + %s = %s",str1,str2,str3);
free(str3);
1

my here use asprintf

sample code:

char* fileTypeToStr(mode_t mode) {
    char * fileStrBuf = NULL;
    asprintf(&fileStrBuf, "%s", "");

    bool isFifo = (bool)S_ISFIFO(mode);
    if (isFifo){
        asprintf(&fileStrBuf, "%s %s,", fileStrBuf, "FIFO");
    }

...

    bool isSocket = (bool)S_ISSOCK(mode);
    if (isSocket){
        asprintf(&fileStrBuf, "%s %s,", fileStrBuf, "Socket");
    }

    return fileStrBuf;
}
0

In C, you don't really have strings, as a generic first-class object. You have to manage them as arrays of characters, which mean that you have to determine how you would like to manage your arrays. One way is to normal variables, e.g. placed on the stack. Another way is to allocate them dynamically using malloc.

Once you have that sorted, you can copy the content of one array to another, to concatenate two strings using strcpy or strcat.

Having said that, C do have the concept of "string literals", which are strings known at compile time. When used, they will be a character array placed in read-only memory. It is, however, possible to concatenate two string literals by writing them next to each other, as in "foo" "bar", which will create the string literal "foobar".

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