1

I am working with a Web Service provided by an ERP company (Infor's SyteLine 8 Web Service). The web service lets you at products to the ERP system by passing a DataTable with a DataRow full of the strings of the values that go into the Item. Many of the value being passed in come from a restricted list.

I initially tried to solve the issue of the restricted list by using Enums for those values. Unfortunately, many of the things I would need to use Enums for will not fit the Enums type because they have names like "KANBAN/JIT" or "040" which will not work in an Enum.

The reason I attempted to use Enums is because I have created a POCO product object in my code that I pass around and assign values to and then pass into the web service by flatting it into a DataRow of strings in a DataTable. That way it is easy to make sure I set values according to what exists like product.productionType = productionTypeEnum.KANBANJIT;.

What are my other options besides using Enums so that I don't run into issues?

| |
1

You can use enums, you just need some method to convert them to string before adding them to the DataRow. For example, the converter can be implemented as an extension method:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

public class Product
{
  public enum ProductionType
  {
    Unknown,
    KanbanJit,
    ZeroForty
  }

  private ProductionType type;

  public ProductionType Type
  {
    get { return this.type; }
    set { this.type = value; }
  }

  // ... other members of Product class ...
}

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
  public static string ToString(this Product.ProductionType productionType)
  {
    switch (productionType)
    {
      case Product.ProductionType.KanbanJit: return "KANBAN/JIT";
      case Product.ProductionType.ZeroForty: return "040";
      default: return string.Empty;
    }
  }
}

public class Program
{
  public static void Main()
  {
    // Create products, set their production type, and add them to a list
    var products = new List<Product>();
    products.Add(new Product() { Type = Product.ProductionType.KanbanJit });
    products.Add(new Product() { Type = Product.ProductionType.ZeroForty });

    // Convert the production types to string and add them to DataRow
    foreach (var product in products)
      AddProductionTypeToDataRow(product.Type.ToString());    
  }

  static void AddProductionTypeToDataRow(string productionType)
  {
    // ... implementation comes here ...
    Console.WriteLine(productionType);
  }
}

== UPDATE ==

Here is another typesafe solution, without the extension method:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Product
{
  public sealed class ProductionType
  {
    private string name;
    private ProductionType(string name = null) { this.name = name; }
    public static implicit operator string(ProductionType type) { return type.name; }
    public static readonly ProductionType KanbanJit = new ProductionType("KANBAN/JIT");
    public static readonly ProductionType ZeroForty = new ProductionType("040");
    // ... other constants ...
    public static readonly ProductionType Unknown = new ProductionType();
  }

  private ProductionType type;

  public ProductionType Type
  {
    get { return this.type; }
    set { this.type = value; }
  }

  // ... other members of Product ...
}

public class Program
{
  public static void Main()
  {
    // Create products, set their production type, and add them to a list
    var products = new List<Product>();
    products.Add(new Product() { Type = Product.ProductionType.KanbanJit });
    products.Add(new Product() { Type = Product.ProductionType.ZeroForty });

    // Convert the production types to string and add them to DataRow
    foreach (var product in products)
      AddProductionTypeToDataRow(product.Type);    
  }

  static void AddProductionTypeToDataRow(string productionType)
  {
    // ... implementation comes here ...
    Console.WriteLine(productionType);
  }
}
| |
  • That is a good idea but this seems like a hack because of the giant switch statement that this could create. – Ben Hoffman Dec 11 '11 at 18:54
  • Hi Ben, what do you think of the second approach? – kol Dec 12 '11 at 18:30
  • It worked great but I ended up using a modified version of the first one. The main reason why is because the object is being passed around as a DataMember and I couldn't get the implicit operator to work just right. – Ben Hoffman Dec 12 '11 at 21:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.