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I need to cascade many changes when updating an entity. I could do it like below, but that is ugly imho (too many parameters already and counting).

public class PageRepository : IPageRepository
{
    public void Update(Page page, string oldPath, PageState oldState, IEnumerable<Tag> oldTags /* Maybe even more stuff */)
    {
        using(var t = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            if(/* path has changed */)
            {
                // move descendant pages
            }
            if(/* state has changed to public */)
            {
                // publish hidden descendant pages
            }
            if(/* state has changed to non-public */)
            {
                // hide public descendant pages
            }
            if(page is ITaggable)
            {
                foreach(var tag in ((ITaggable)page).Tags.Except(oldTags))
                {
                    // increase tag count in ancestor pages
                }
                foreach(var tag in oldTags.Except(((ITaggable)page).Tags))
                {
                    // decrease tag count in ancestor pages
                }
            }

            // ...

            session.Update(page);
            t.Commit();
        }
    }
}

Is there any pattern that could help making that cleaner?

I have already thought about splitting that to multiple methods

pageRepo.BeginTransaction();
pageRepo.Update(page);
if(/* path has changed */)
{
    pageRepo.MoveDescendants(page, oldPath);
}
// ...

pageRepo.Commit();

but I don't like that manual transaction handling. Another idea I got is

using(var batch = pageRepo.CreateUpdateBatch(page))
{
    if(/* path has changed */)
    {
        batch.MoveDescendants(oldPath);
    }
    // ...
    batch.Commit();
}
1

This doesn't belong in a repository. The cascading changes should be managed by some kind of a factory or service class that coordinates all of the changes.

Keep your repositories only concerned with retrieving and saving data, not with maintaining data integrity. These are business rules that should go in domain code, not a repository implementation.

2
  • What if last step fails? How can I rollback changes if the previous step transaction is gone? – Mike Koder Dec 11 '11 at 18:45
  • 1
    Don't wrap the using{} block around code in the repository. Instead, wrap an IUnitOfWork interface around your session, exposing only the BeginTransation() and Commit() methods, and then expose that interface from the repository. This way, you can call the UnitOfWork.BeginTransaction() and UnitOfWork.Commit() methods from your coordinating class, instead of from within the repository. – danludwig Dec 11 '11 at 18:48

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