15

So I have generated a parser via JISON:

// mygenerator.js
var Parser = require("jison").Parser;

// a grammar in JSON
var grammar = {
    "lex": {
        "rules": [
           ["\\s+", "/* skip whitespace */"],
           ["[a-f0-9]+", "return 'HEX';"]
        ]
    },

    "bnf": {
        "hex_strings" :[ "hex_strings HEX",
                         "HEX" ]
    }
};

// `grammar` can also be a string that uses jison's grammar format
var parser = new Parser(grammar);

// generate source, ready to be written to disk
var parserSource = parser.generate();

// you can also use the parser directly from memory

// returns true
parser.parse("adfe34bc e82a");

// throws lexical error
parser.parse("adfe34bc zxg");

My question is, how do I retrieve the AST now? I can see that I can run the parser against input, but it just returns true if it works or fails if not.

For the record, I am using JISON: http://zaach.github.com/jison/docs/

1

2 Answers 2

15

I discovered an easier and cleaner way than the one in the other answer.

This post is divided into 2 parts:

  • General way: Read how to implement my way.
  • Actual answer: An implementation of the previously described way specific to OP's request.

General way

  1. Add a return statement to your start rule.

    Example:

    start
        : xyz EOF
            {return $1;}
        ;
    

    xyz is another production rule. $1 accesses the value of the first symbol (either terminal or non-terminal) of the associated production rule. In the above code $1 contains the result from xyz.

  2. Add $$ = ... statements to all other rules.

    Warning: Use $$ = ..., don't return! return will immediately abort further execution by returning the specified value, as the name indicates.

    Example:

    multiplication
        : variable '*' variable
            {$$ = {
                type: 'multiplication',
                arguments: [
                  $1,
                  $3
                ]
              };
            }
        ;
    

    The above production rule will pass the object $$ to the higher level (i.e. the production rule which used this rule).

    Let's complement the multiplication rule in order to achieve a runnable example:

    /* lexical grammar */
    %lex
    %%
    
    \s+                   /* skip whitespace */
    [0-9]+("."[0-9]+)?\b  return 'NUMBER'
    [a-zA-Z]+             return 'CHARACTER'
    "*"                   return '*'
    <<EOF>>               return 'EOF'
    .                     return 'INVALID'
    
    /lex
    
    %start start
    %% /* language grammar */
    
    start
        : multiplication EOF
            {return $1;}
        ;
    
    multiplication
        : variable '*' variable
            {$$ = {
                type: 'multiplication',
                arguments: [
                  $1,
                  $3
                ]
              };
            }
        ;
    
    variable
        : 'NUMBER'
            {$$ = {
                  type: 'number',
                  arguments: [$1]
                };
             }
        | 'CHARACTER'
            {$$ = {
                  type: 'character',
                  arguments: [$1]
                };
             }
        ;
    

    You can try it online: http://zaach.github.io/jison/try/. At the time of this edit (12.02.2017), the online generator sadly throws an error - independently of the Jison file you feed in. See the addendum after step 3 for hints on how to generate the parser on your local machine.

    If you input for example a*3, you get the object structure below:

    {
      "type": "multiplication",
      "arguments": [
        {
          "type": "character",
          "arguments": ["a"]
        },
        {
          "type": "number",
          "arguments": ["3"]
        }
      ]
    }
    
  3. Clean the code and generated AST by injecting custom objects

    When using the Jison-generated parser, you can inject arbitrary objects into the scope of the 'code blocks' in the syntax file:

    const MyParser = require('./my-parser.js');
    MyParser.parser.yy = {
       MultiplicationTerm
       /*, AdditionTerm, NegationTerm etc. */
    };
    
    let calculation = MyParser.parse("3*4");
    // Using the modification below, calculation will now be an object of type MultiplicationTerm
    

    If MultiplicationTerm had a constructor accepting both factors, the new part for multiplication would look like this:

    multiplication
        : variable '*' variable
            {$$ = new yy.MultiplicationTerm($1, $3);}
        ;
    

Addendum on how to create the Jison parser:

Download the Jison NPM module. Then you can create the Jison-parser either by using Jison's command-line or running new jison.Generator(fileContents).generate() in your build file and write the returned string to your preferred file, e.g. my-parser.js.

Actual answer

Applying the rules above leads to the Jison file below.
The Jison file format and the JavaScript API (as stated in the question) are interchangeable as far as I know.

Also note that this Jison file only produces a flat tree (i.e. a list) since the input format is only a list as well (or how would you nest concatenated hex strings in a logical way?).

/* lexical grammar */
%lex
%%

\s+                   /* skip whitespace */
[a-f0-9]+             return 'HEX'
<<EOF>>               return 'EOF'
.                     return 'INVALID'

/lex

%start start
%% /* language grammar */

start
    :  hex_strings EOF
        {return $1;}
    ;

hex_strings
    : hex_strings HEX
        {$$ = $1.concat([$2]);}
    | HEX
        {$$ = [$1];}
    ;
1
  • {$$ = {your:"parse tree node description here",as:"an object"} that's what I was looking for. Thank you!
    – Flion
    Oct 29, 2014 at 15:41
13

I'm not too familiar with Jison's inner workings, so I don't know any method that would do it.

But in case you're interested in a little bruteforce to solve this problem, try this:

First, create an object to hold the AST

function jisonAST(name, x) { this.name = name; this.x = x; }

// return the indented AST
jisonAST.prototype.get = function(indent){
  // create an indentation for level l
  function indentString(l) { var r=""; for(var i=0;i<l;i++){r+="  "}; return r }

  var r = indentString(indent) + "["+this.name+": ";
  var rem = this.x;
  if( rem.length == 1 && !(rem[0] instanceof jisonAST) ) r += "'"+rem[0]+"'"; 
  else for( i in rem ){ 
      if( rem[i] instanceof jisonAST ) r += "\n" + rem[i].get(indent+1);
      else { r += "\n" + indentString(indent+1); r += "'"+rem[i]+"'"; }
    }
  return r + "]";
}

Add a little helper function for Jison's BNF

function o( s ){
    r = "$$ = new yy.jisonAST('"+s+"',[";
    for( i = 1; i <= s.split(" ").length; i++ ){ r += "$"+i+"," }
    r = r.slice(0,-1) + "]);";
    return [s,r];
}

With this, continue to the example code (slight modification):

var Parser = require("jison").Parser;

// a grammar in JSON
var grammar = {
    "lex": {
        "rules": [
           ["\\s+", "/* skip whitespace */"],
           ["[a-f0-9]+", "return 'HEX';"]
        ]
    },
    "bnf": {
        // had to add a start/end, see below
        "start" : [ [ "hex_strings", "return $1" ] ],
        "hex_strings" :[ 
            o("hex_strings HEX"), 
            o("HEX") 
        ]
    }
};

var parser = new Parser(grammar);
// expose the AST object to Jison
parser.yy.jisonAST = jisonAST

Now you can try parsing:

console.log( parser.parse("adfe34bc e82a 43af").get(0) );

This will give you:

[hex_strings HEX: 
  [hex_strings HEX: 
    [HEX: 'adfe34bc']  
    'e82a']  
  '43af']

Small note: I had to add a "start" rule, in order to only have one statement that returns the result. It is not clean (since the BNF works fine without it). Set it as an entry point to be sure...

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