242

I found a way to make a div container to occupy at least full height of a page, by setting min-height: 100%;. However, when I add a nested div and set height: 100%;, it doesn't stretch to container's height. Is there a way to fix it?

html, body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}

#containment {
  min-height: 100%;
  background: pink;
}

#containment-shadow-left {
  height: 100%;
  background: aqua;
}
<div id="containment">
  <div id="containment-shadow-left">
    Hello World!
  </div>
</div>

3
  • 45
    Modern day solution: give the container display:flex and flex-direction:column and give the child flex:1.
    – jackocnr
    Aug 5, 2016 at 21:14
  • 3
    @jackocnr That doesn't work in any IE due to a bug, it was fixed in Edge.
    – Stickers
    Feb 11, 2018 at 19:22
  • @jackocnr not working in chrome or firefox in 2021, but it works in some online code editors
    – maazakn
    Dec 9, 2021 at 17:59

17 Answers 17

237

Add height: 1px to parent container. Works in Chrome, FF, Safari.

14
  • 10
    Doing this doesn't resolve the issue, effectively you're overriding the min-height:100% setting which achieves nothing that couldn't be achieved with height:100% which isn't what the OP wants
    – styler
    Mar 19, 2014 at 13:02
  • 19
    @styler adding height: 1px; will not override the min-height. Quite the opposite. This is the best solution here... demo: jsbin.com/mosaboyo/1/edit
    – jjenzz
    May 1, 2014 at 9:52
  • 3
    See this for why height: 1px; works stackoverflow.com/questions/2341821/height100-vs-min-height100
    – Ben Alavi
    Aug 14, 2014 at 19:56
  • 40
    @jjenzz The problem with this, which I think styler was trying to get at, is that this does not retain the expansion trait of min-height. E.g., if there is enough text it will overflow. See jsbin.com/vuyapitizo/1
    – binaryfunt
    Apr 13, 2015 at 23:45
  • 8
    Quoting Paul's comment below: "But it doesn't allow the container to grow, which defeats the purpose of using min-height." stackoverflow.com/questions/8468066/…
    – Leo Lei
    Jul 26, 2017 at 5:30
186

This is a reported webkit (chrome/safari) bug, children of parents with min-height can't inherit the height property: https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=26559

Apparently Firefox is affected too (can't test in IE at the moment)

Possible workaround:

  • add position:relative to #containment
  • add position:absolute to #containment-shadow-left

The bug doesn't show when the inner element has absolute positioning.

See http://jsfiddle.net/xrebB/

Edit on April 10, 2014

Since I'm currently working on a project for which I really need parent containers with min-height, and child elements inheriting the height of the container, I did some more research.

First: I'm not so sure anymore whether the current browser behaviour really is a bug. CSS2.1 specs say:

The percentage is calculated with respect to the height of the generated box's containing block. If the height of the containing block is not specified explicitly (i.e., it depends on content height), and this element is not absolutely positioned, the value computes to 'auto'.

If I put a min-height on my container, I'm not explicitly specifying its height - so my element should get an auto height. And that's exactly what Webkit - and all other browsers - do.

Second, the workaround I found:

If I set my container element to display:table with height:inherit it acts exactly the same way as if I'd give it a min-height of 100%. And - more importantly - if I set the child element to display:table-cell it will perfectly inherit the height of the container element - whether it's 100% or more.

Full CSS:

html, body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}

#container {
  background: green;
  display: table;
  height: inherit;
  width: 100%;
}

#content {
  background: red;
  display: table-cell;
}

The markup:

<div id="container">
  <div id="content">
      <p>content</p>
  </div>
</div>

See http://jsfiddle.net/xrebB/54/.

6
  • Although this is a good solution, I like most the one from @Kushagra Gour, because that does not affect the layout (I don't want to use table diplays...)
    – Cito
    Jul 24, 2014 at 19:26
  • 3
    Its a strange reading of the spec to conclude that min-/max-height isn't explicit...and by strange I mean wrong. Reading the whole paragraph, in context, this interpretation is incorrect. To clarify why, "height of the containing block," in context, is semantically different then the height property. If instead, the phrasing was "height property of the containing block" then Your interpretation would make sense (and be a bug in the spec). Sep 17, 2015 at 18:17
  • position: absolute; min-height: inherit; min-width: inherit; This worked for me
    – StJohn3D
    Nov 12, 2018 at 21:56
  • 3
    Note, as the edit (and the bugs.webkit link) mentions, this isn't really a bug — if a parent was min-height: 20px, but a child was height: 120%, that would influence the parent's height, which would influence the child's height... When the parents height is unknowable, the children can't use it for sizing. Jun 7, 2019 at 4:52
  • 2
    Still got this bug in 2021 codepen.io/dshung1997/pen/LYxvXNy
    – hungdoansy
    Apr 28, 2021 at 12:05
168

thought I would share this, as I didnt see this anywhere, and is what I used to fix my solution.

SOLUTION: min-height: inherit;

I had a parent with a specified min height, and I needed a child to also be that height.

.parent {
  min-height: 300px;
  background-color: rgba(255,255,0,0.5); //yellow
}

.child {
  min-height: inherit;
  background-color: rgba(0,255,0,0.5); //blue
}

p {
  padding: 20px;
  color: red;
  font-family: sans-serif;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="child">
    <p>Yellow + Blue = Green :)</p>
  </div>
</div>

This way the child now acts as height 100% of the min-height.

I hope some people find this useful :)

3
  • 11
    Partially works, but child only inherits the min-height. When parents height is bigger, child won't expand.
    – OguzGelal
    Mar 13, 2018 at 21:03
  • It works in the situations which the parent element doesn't resize.
    – Arad
    Apr 7, 2018 at 6:53
  • 7
    It only works when the min-height is absolute, not percentage, AFAICS.
    – BenMorel
    Oct 14, 2018 at 20:47
37

This was added in a comment by @jackocnr but I missed it. For modern browsers I think this is the best approach.

It makes the inner element fill the whole container if it's too small, but expands the container's height if it's too big.

#containment {
  min-height: 100%;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

#containment-shadow-left {
  flex: 1;
}
0
11

Although display: flex; has been suggested here, consider using display: grid; now that it's widely supported. By default, the only child of a grid will entirely fill its parent.

html, body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0; /* Don't forget Safari */
}

#containment {
  display: grid;
  min-height: 100%;
  background: pink;
}

#containment-shadow-left {
  background: aqua;
}

10

Kushagra Gour's solution does work (at least in Chrome and IE) and solves the original problem without having to use display: table; and display: table-cell;. See plunker: http://plnkr.co/edit/ULEgY1FDCsk8yiRTfOWU

Setting min-height: 100%; height: 1px; on the outer div causes its actual height to be at least 100%, as required. It also allows the inner div to correctly inherit the height.

2
  • 25
    But it doesn't allow the container to grow, which defeats the purpose of using min-height.
    – Sal
    Sep 29, 2016 at 20:31
  • I needed a wrapper to fill the parent's min-height and height as well. What worked for me was setting min-height to inherit and height to 100%.
    – Mr. Duhart
    Sep 16, 2019 at 23:02
7

In addition to the existing answers, there is also viewport units vh to use. Simple snippet below. Of course it can be used together with calc() as well, e.g. min-height: calc(100vh - 200px); when page header and footer have 200px height together.

body {
  margin: 0;
}

.child {
  min-height: 100vh;
  background: pink;
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="child"></div>
</div>

5

I don't believe this is a bug with browsers. All behave the same way - that is, once you stop specifying explicit heights, min-height is basically a "last step".

It appears to be exactly how the CSS 2.1 spec suggests: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visudet.html#the-height-property

The percentage is calculated with respect to the height of the generated box's containing block. If the height of the containing block is not specified explicitly (i.e., it depends on content height), and this element is not absolutely positioned, the value computes to 'auto'.

Therefore, as the min-height parent does not have an explicit height property set, it defaults to auto.

There are some ways around this possibly by using display: table-cell, or newer styles such as flexbox, if that is possible for your targeted audience's browsers. You can also subvert this in certain situations by using the top and bottom properties on an absolutely positioned inner element, which gives you 100% height without specifying so.

5

This usually works for me:

.parent {
  min-height: 100px;
  background-color: green;
  display: flex;
}
.child {
  height: inherit;
  width: 100%;
  background-color: red;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body>
    <div class="parent">
      <div class="child">
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

2

For googlers:

This jquery-workaround makes #containment get a height automatically (by, height: auto), then gets the actual height assigned as a pixel value.

<script type="text/javascript">
<!--
    $(function () {

        // workaround for webkit-bug http://stackoverflow.com/a/8468131/348841

        var rz = function () {
            $('#containment')
            .css('height', 'auto')
            .css('height', $('#containment').height() + 'px');
        };

        $(window).resize(function () {
            rz();
        });

        rz();

    })
-->
</script>
1
  • Nice workaround, you can just set the min-height of the element, without setting the height to 'auto'. It worked for me. May 30, 2014 at 12:15
1

Another JS solution, that is easy and can be used to avoid a non-easy CSS-only or extra markup / hacky solution.

function minHeight(elm, percent) {
  var windowHeight = isNaN(window.innerHeight) ? 
                     window.clientHeight : window.innerHeight;
  var height = windowHeight * percent / 100;
  elm.style.minHeight = height + 'px';
}

W/ jQuery :

function minHeight($elm, percent) {
  var windowHeight = $(window).height();
  var height = windowHeight * percent / 100;
  $elm.css('min-height', height + 'px');
}

Angular directive :

myModule.directive('minHeight', ['$window', function($window) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function(scope, elm, attrs) {
      var windowHeight = isNaN($window.innerHeight) ? 
               $window.clientHeight : $window.innerHeight;
      var height = windowHeight * attrs.minHeight / 100;
      elm.css('min-height', height + 'px');
    }
  };
}]);

To be used like this :

<div>
  <!-- height auto here -->
  <div min-height="100">
    <!-- This guy is at least 100% of window height but grows if needed -->
  </div>
</div>
1
  • Thanks for the directive solution. That's what I ended up using but I didn't want window height to be the min; rather I wanted to inherit the min-height of the parent so I changed the code to this: var height = elm.parent()[0].offsetHeight;
    – Sal
    Sep 29, 2016 at 21:46
1

The best way to achieve this nowadays is to use display: flex;. However you might run into an issue when trying to support IE11. According to https://caniuse.com using flexbox :

IE 11 does not vertically align items correctly when min-height is used

Internet Explorer compatible solution

The solution is to use display: table; on the parent and display: table-row; on the child both with height: 100%; as a replacement for min-height: 100%;.

Most of the solutions listed here use display: table, table-row and/or table-cell, but they don't replicate the same behaviour as min-height: 100%;, which is:

  • Inherit the computed height of the parent (as opposed to inheriting its height property);
  • Allow the parent's height to exceed its min-height;

While using this solution, the behaviour is the same and the property min-height is not needed which allows to get around the bug.

Explanation

The reason why it works is because, unlike most elements, elements using display: table and table-row will always be as tall as their content. This makes their height property behave similarly to min-height.

Solution in action

html, body {
  height: 100px;
  margin: 0;
}

#containment {
  display: table;
  height: 100%;
  background: pink;
  width: 100%;
}

#containment-shadow-left {
  display: table-row;
  height: 100%;
  background: aqua;
}

#content {
  padding: 15px;
}

#demo {
  display: none;
  background-color: red;
  height: 200px;
}

#demo-checkbox:checked ~ #demo {
  display: block;
}
<div id="containment">
  <div id="containment-shadow-left">
    <div id="content">
      <input id="demo-checkbox" type="checkbox">
      <label for="demo-checkbox">Click here for overflow demo</label>
      <div id="demo">This is taller than #containment</div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

1

Adding this to parent component fixed it for me:

display: flex;
flex-direction: column;
0

Just to keep this subject complete, I found a solution not explored Here using Fixed position.

No Overflow

html, body, .wrapper, .parent, .child {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0; 
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  height: 100%;
}

.child {
  overflow: auto;
  background: gray;
}

.height-50 {
  height: 50%;
  width: 5em;
  margin: 10px auto;
  background: cyan;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
      
      <div class="height-50"></div>
      
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

With Overflow

html, body, .wrapper, .parent, .child {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0; 
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  height: 100%;
}

.child {
  overflow: auto;
  background: gray;
}

.height-150 {
  height: 150%;
  width: 5em;
  margin: 10px auto;
  background: cyan;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
      
      <div class="height-150"></div>
      
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

0

SOLUTION July 06 2022

.parent{
  display: flex; /* very important rule */
  flex-direction: column; /* very important rule */

  min-height: 100%
}

.child{
  height: 100%;

  flex-grow: 1; /* very important rule, simulate flex: 1; */
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="child">
  </div>
</div>

1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Ethan
    Jul 11 at 1:38
-3

after trying for ours! chrome understands that I want the child element to be 100% height when I set the display value to inline block. btw setting float will causing it.

display:inline-block

update

this is not working. the solution is to get the parentnode offsetheight and use it at the and of the page with javascript.

<script>
    SomedivElement = document.getElementById('mydiv');
    SomedivElement.style.height = String(nvleft.parentNode.offsetHeight) + 'px';    
</script>
-3

This is what works for me with percentage-based height and parent still growing according to children height. Works fine in Firefox, Chrome and Safari.

.parent {
  position: relative;
  min-height: 100%;
}

.child {
  min-height: 100vh;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
  </div>

0

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