46

You can understand why I'm trying to find the dominant color in an image if you use Windows 7. When your mouse over a program in the taskbar, the background of that particular program changes based on the most dominant color in the icon. I have noticed this technique used in other programs as well, but can't remember them off the top of my head.

I can see this being helpful in a number of UI techniques that I'm using to develop an application, and I was wondering how finding the most common color would be achieved from an Android drawable resource.

  • A new API was added with Lollipop that helps extract prominent colors from a Bitmap. See my answer below for details. Since the Palette class mentioned is in the support7 library, it should work in older versions of Android as well. – Tony Wickham Jan 26 '15 at 6:01
  • android v7 palette support lib does that for us.Anyone looking for demo code2concept.blogspot.in/2015/10/… – nitesh Oct 23 '15 at 7:57
70

In Android 5.0 Lollipop, a class was added to help extract useful colors from a Bitmap. The Palette class, found in android.support.v7.graphics, can extract the following colors:

  • Vibrant
  • Vibrant Dark
  • Vibrant Light
  • Muted
  • Muted Dark
  • Muted Light

This Android training page gives all the details you need to use the class (I tried it myself in Android Studio and it was very straightforward): http://developer.android.com/training/material/drawables.html#ColorExtract

To quote:

The Android Support Library r21 and above includes the Palette class, which lets you extract prominent colors from an image. To extract these colors, pass a Bitmap object to the Palette.generate() static method in the background thread where you load your images. If you can't use that thread, call the Palette.generateAsync() method and provide a listener instead.*

You can retrieve the prominent colors from the image using the getter methods in the Palette class, such as Palette.getVibrantColor.

To use the Palette class in your project, add the following Gradle dependency to your app's module:

dependencies {
    ...
    implementation 'com.android.support:palette-v7:21.0.+'
}

Or if you're using androidx:

implementation 'androidx.palette:palette:1.0.0'

If you need to use generateAsync(), here's how:

Palette.generateAsync(bitmap, new Palette.PaletteAsyncListener() {
    public void onGenerated(Palette palette) {
        // Do something with colors...
    }
});

EDIT: Since the question asks how to extract colors from a drawable resource, you'd first have to convert the drawable to a bitmap to use the technique I've described. Luckily, that is quite simple using BitmapFactory:

Bitmap icon = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(context.getResources(),
                                       R.drawable.icon_resource);`
  • If you want to experiment with what colors the Palette class extracts, check out my app on the Play Store: play.google.com/store/apps/…. You can find the source code for it on GitHub: github.com/tony-w/PaletteColorExtraction – Tony Wickham Mar 1 '15 at 7:26
  • 2
    Excellent answer. This makes most of the available libraries and methods redundant. – Baz Mar 20 '15 at 10:14
  • I think it would be best to explain everything, that way it would be clearer... – Ab_ Oct 21 '16 at 18:40
  • 2
    Palette.generateAsync method has been deprecated. Use Palette.from(bitmap).generate(paletteListener) instead – A.J. May 11 '17 at 21:12
  • 2
    @Spritzig use from: Palette.from(bitmap).generate(new PaletteAsyncListener() { public void onGenerated(Palette p) { // Use generated instance } }); – Ken Nichols Jun 23 at 20:34
29

There is also an another solution, it's more approximative but if you don't want to have long delay for searching color, it can do the job.

public static int getDominantColor(Bitmap bitmap) {
    Bitmap newBitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, 1, 1, true);
    final int color = newBitmap.getPixel(0, 0);
    newBitmap.recycle();
    return color;
}
  • This is a very helpful answer. I was using the loop method but that was making the UI jerky. Now it's very smooth. – Abdullah Umer Dec 24 '15 at 17:08
  • There is a syntax error in the code though. – Abdullah Umer Dec 24 '15 at 17:09
  • As of support:palette-v7:25.0.0, this no longer needs a custom method - just use palette.getDominantSwatch(). – David Doyle Nov 22 '16 at 10:47
  • It still take some time to be done and need to be done asynchronously. – Pdroid Dec 22 '16 at 18:33
  • 2
    good approach but it cannot return an appropriate color! – MilaDroid Aug 16 '18 at 8:26
7

This class iterates through a Bitmap and returns the most dominate colour. Feel free to clean up the code where necessary.

public class ImageColour {

String colour;


public ImageColour(Bitmap image) throws Exception {

     int height = image.getHeight();
     int width = image.getWidth();

     Map m = new HashMap();

        for(int i=0; i < width ; i++){

            for(int j=0; j < height ; j++){

                int rgb = image.getPixel(i, j);
                int[] rgbArr = getRGBArr(rgb);                

                if (!isGray(rgbArr)) {   

                        Integer counter = (Integer) m.get(rgb);   
                        if (counter == null)
                            counter = 0;
                        counter++;                                
                        m.put(rgb, counter);       

                }                
            }
        }        

        String colourHex = getMostCommonColour(m);
    }



    public static String getMostCommonColour(Map map) {

        List list = new LinkedList(map.entrySet());
        Collections.sort(list, new Comparator() {
              public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {

                return ((Comparable) ((Map.Entry) (o1)).getValue())
                  .compareTo(((Map.Entry) (o2)).getValue());

              }

        });    

        Map.Entry me = (Map.Entry )list.get(list.size()-1);
        int[] rgb= getRGBArr((Integer)me.getKey());

        return Integer.toHexString(rgb[0])+" "+Integer.toHexString(rgb[1])+" "+Integer.toHexString(rgb[2]);        
    }    


    public static int[] getRGBArr(int pixel) {

        int red = (pixel >> 16) & 0xff;
        int green = (pixel >> 8) & 0xff;
        int blue = (pixel) & 0xff;

        return new int[]{red,green,blue};

  }

    public static boolean isGray(int[] rgbArr) {

        int rgDiff = rgbArr[0] - rgbArr[1];
        int rbDiff = rgbArr[0] - rgbArr[2];

        int tolerance = 10;

        if (rgDiff > tolerance || rgDiff < -tolerance) 
            if (rbDiff > tolerance || rbDiff < -tolerance) { 

                return false;

            }                

        return true;
    }


public String returnColour() {

    if (colour.length() == 6) {
        return colour.replaceAll("\\s", "");
    } else {
        return "ffffff";
    }
}

to get the hex simply call returnColour();

  • I suggest to whoever uses this approach to play with the tolerance variable. Depending on the value you set it the algorithm runs faster or slower. – Thiago M Rocha Aug 19 '14 at 14:36
4

I wrote my own methods to get dominant color:

Method 1 (My technique)

  1. Reduce to ARGB_4444 color space
  2. Compute the maximum occurrence of individual RGB elements and obtaining 3 distinctive maximum values
  3. Combining maximum values to dominant RGB color

    public int getDominantColor1(Bitmap bitmap) {
    
    if (bitmap == null)
        throw new NullPointerException();
    
    int width = bitmap.getWidth();
    int height = bitmap.getHeight();
    int size = width * height;
    int pixels[] = new int[size];
    
    Bitmap bitmap2 = bitmap.copy(Bitmap.Config.ARGB_4444, false);
    
    bitmap2.getPixels(pixels, 0, width, 0, 0, width, height);
    
    final List<HashMap<Integer, Integer>> colorMap = new ArrayList<HashMap<Integer, Integer>>();
    colorMap.add(new HashMap<Integer, Integer>());
    colorMap.add(new HashMap<Integer, Integer>());
    colorMap.add(new HashMap<Integer, Integer>());
    
    int color = 0;
    int r = 0;
    int g = 0;
    int b = 0;
    Integer rC, gC, bC;
    for (int i = 0; i < pixels.length; i++) {
        color = pixels[i];
    
        r = Color.red(color);
        g = Color.green(color);
        b = Color.blue(color);
    
        rC = colorMap.get(0).get(r);
        if (rC == null)
            rC = 0;
        colorMap.get(0).put(r, ++rC);
    
        gC = colorMap.get(1).get(g);
        if (gC == null)
            gC = 0;
        colorMap.get(1).put(g, ++gC);
    
        bC = colorMap.get(2).get(b);
        if (bC == null)
            bC = 0;
        colorMap.get(2).put(b, ++bC);
    }
    
    int[] rgb = new int[3];
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        int max = 0;
        int val = 0;
        for (Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : colorMap.get(i).entrySet()) {
            if (entry.getValue() > max) {
                max = entry.getValue();
                val = entry.getKey();
            }
        }
        rgb[i] = val;
    }
    
    int dominantColor = Color.rgb(rgb[0], rgb[1], rgb[2]);
    
    return dominantColor;
     }
    

Method 2 (Old technique)

  1. Reduce to ARGB_4444 color space
  2. Compute the occurrence of each color and finding the maximum one as dominant color

    public int getDominantColor2(Bitmap bitmap) {
    if (bitmap == null)
        throw new NullPointerException();
    
    int width = bitmap.getWidth();
    int height = bitmap.getHeight();
    int size = width * height;
    int pixels[] = new int[size];
    
    Bitmap bitmap2 = bitmap.copy(Bitmap.Config.ARGB_4444, false);
    
    bitmap2.getPixels(pixels, 0, width, 0, 0, width, height);
    
    HashMap<Integer, Integer> colorMap = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
    
    int color = 0;
    Integer count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < pixels.length; i++) {
        color = pixels[i];
        count = colorMap.get(color);
        if (count == null)
            count = 0;
        colorMap.put(color, ++count);
    }
    
    int dominantColor = 0;
    int max = 0;
    for (Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : colorMap.entrySet()) {
        if (entry.getValue() > max) {
            max = entry.getValue();
            dominantColor = entry.getKey();
        }
    }
    return dominantColor;
    }
    
  • question: What is bitmap2 for? you don't seem to use it after copying from the original bitmap. – Hendra Anggrian Jun 20 '15 at 14:47
2

Loop through all the pixel's color data and average the color values, ignore anything that is a shade of grey or transparent. I believe that is what Microsoft does in Windows 7 based on a recent blog post.

edit
The blog post: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2011/12/06/10244432.aspx

This link showing how Chrome picks the dominant color may also be helpful. http://www.quora.com/Google-Chrome/How-does-Chrome-pick-the-color-for-the-stripes-on-the-Most-visited-page-thumbnails

  • I was hoping there would be an API function buried deep somewhere. This is good info – styler1972 Jan 9 '12 at 16:44
  • 3
    I found a simple hack: copy as a 1x1 bitmap and get the color: aerilys.fr/blog/?p=1341 – radley Sep 27 '14 at 16:54
2

To find the Dominant / Vibrant / Muted color from an image, use Palette:

import:

implementation 'androidx.palette:palette:1.0.0'

usage:

    val bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(resources, R.drawable.image)

    Palette.Builder(bitmap).generate { it?.let {  palette ->
        val dominantColor = palette.getDominantColor(ContextCompat.getColor(context!!, R.color.defaultColor))

        // TODO: use dominant color

    } }
0

None of the other answers did the job for me, and I didn't rule out the cause of the problem.

This is what I ended up using:

public static int getDominantColor(Bitmap bitmap) {
    if (bitmap == null) {
        return Color.TRANSPARENT;
    }
    int width = bitmap.getWidth();
    int height = bitmap.getHeight();
    int size = width * height;
    int pixels[] = new int[size];
    //Bitmap bitmap2 = bitmap.copy(Bitmap.Config.ARGB_4444, false);
    bitmap.getPixels(pixels, 0, width, 0, 0, width, height);
    int color;
    int r = 0;
    int g = 0;
    int b = 0;
    int a;
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < pixels.length; i++) {
        color = pixels[i];
        a = Color.alpha(color);
        if (a > 0) {
            r += Color.red(color);
            g += Color.green(color);
            b += Color.blue(color);
            count++;
        }
    }
    r /= count;
    g /= count;
    b /= count;
    r = (r << 16) & 0x00FF0000;
    g = (g << 8) & 0x0000FF00;
    b = b & 0x000000FF;
    color = 0xFF000000 | r | g | b;
    return color;
}
  • Thank you! Android's pallete generator seems to intentionally avoid getting the most used color – BooleanCheese Apr 24 '18 at 23:39
0

Add to dependencies

implementation 'androidx.palette:palette:1.0.0'

and..

Bitmap bitmap = ((BitmapDrawable) imageView.getDrawable()).getBitmap();
Palette.from(bitmap).generate(palette -> {
    int vibrant = palette.getVibrantColor(0x000000); // <=== color you want
    int vibrantLight = palette.getLightVibrantColor(0x000000);
    int vibrantDark = palette.getDarkVibrantColor(0x000000);
    int muted = palette.getMutedColor(0x000000);
    int mutedLight = palette.getLightMutedColor(0x000000);
    int mutedDark = palette.getDarkMutedColor(0x000000);
});

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