71

I use the jQuery extend function to extend a class prototype.

For example:

MyWidget = function(name_var) {
  this.init(name_var);
}

$.extend(MyWidget.prototype, {
   // object variables
   widget_name: '',

   init: function(widget_name) {
     // do initialization here
     this.widget_name = widget_name;
   },

   doSomething: function() {
     // an example object method
     alert('my name is '+this.widget_name);
   }
});


// example of using the class built above
var widget1 = new MyWidget('widget one');
widget1.doSomething();

Is there a better way to do this? Is there a cleaner way to create the class above with only one statement instead of two?

53

I quite like John Resig's Simple JavaScript Inheritance.

var MyWidget = Class.extend({
  init: function(widget_name){
    this.widget_name = widget_name;
  },

  doSomething: function() {
    alert('my name is ' + this.widget_name);
  }
});

NB: The "Class" object demonstrated above isn't included in jQuery itself - it's a 25 line snippet from Mr. jQuery himself, provided in the article above.

1
  • 5
    Ahh. I guess I should have read the whole article first. This is a clean solution, although it does require some extra setup code.
    – Devon
    Sep 17 '08 at 16:24
24

Why not just use the simple OOP that JavaScript itself provides...long before jQuery?

var myClass = function(){};
myClass.prototype = {
    some_property: null,
    some_other_property: 0,

    doSomething: function(msg) {
        this.some_property = msg;
        alert(this.some_property);
    }
};

Then you just create an instance of the class:

var myClassObject = new myClass();
myClassObject.doSomething("Hello Worlds");

Simple!

3
  • Library independent, very nice! Although I prefer the declaration more "class" like: function MyClassName() {}; Feb 20 '13 at 12:23
  • 9
    @CrazyMerlin shouldn't you define properties like some_property and some_other_property in the constructor and define methods on the prototype.. that way each instances gets it own property instead of sharing it amongst each other.. Feb 20 '14 at 4:10
  • Absolutely, if you are using ES6 syntax. This was just a legacy example to show that vanilla JS from generations ago has this functionality without using a library of any kind. ES6 is awesome! Jul 23 '19 at 16:17
17

To summarise what I have learned so far:

Here is the Base function that makes Class.extend() work in jQuery (Copied from Simple JavaScript Inheritance by John Resig):

// Inspired by base2 and Prototype
(function(){
  var initializing = false, fnTest = /xyz/.test(function(){xyz;}) ? /\b_super\b/ : /.*/;

  // The base Class implementation (does nothing)
  this.Class = function(){};

  // Create a new Class that inherits from this class
  Class.extend = function(prop) {
    var _super = this.prototype;

    // Instantiate a base class (but only create the instance,
    // don't run the init constructor)
    initializing = true;
    var prototype = new this();
    initializing = false;

    // Copy the properties over onto the new prototype
    for (var name in prop) {
      // Check if we're overwriting an existing function
      prototype[name] = typeof prop[name] == "function" &&
        typeof _super[name] == "function" && fnTest.test(prop[name]) ?
        (function(name, fn){
          return function() {
            var tmp = this._super;

            // Add a new ._super() method that is the same method
            // but on the super-class
            this._super = _super[name];

            // The method only need to be bound temporarily, so we
            // remove it when we're done executing
            var ret = fn.apply(this, arguments);       
            this._super = tmp;

            return ret;
          };
        })(name, prop[name]) :
        prop[name];
    }

    // The dummy class constructor
    function Class() {
      // All construction is actually done in the init method
      if ( !initializing && this.init )
        this.init.apply(this, arguments);
    }

    // Populate our constructed prototype object
    Class.prototype = prototype;

    // Enforce the constructor to be what we expect
    Class.constructor = Class;

    // And make this class extendable
    Class.extend = arguments.callee;

    return Class;
  };
})();

Once you have run executed this code, then that makes the following code from insin's answer possible:

var MyWidget = Class.extend({
  init: function(widget_name){
    this.widget_name = widget_name;
  },

  doSomething: function() {
    alert('my name is ' + this.widget_name);
  }
});

This is a nice, clean solution. But I'm interested to see if anyone has a solution that doesn't require adding anything to jquery.

3

jQuery doesn't offer that. But Prototype does, via Class.create.

0

I found this website a impressive one for oops in javascript Here

0

This is long gone dead, but if anyone else searches for jQuery creating class - check this plugin: http://plugins.jquery.com/project/HJS

1
  • If you already discovered that answering with links is problematic, as the content often disappears, when why repeat the same mistake? It is not plagiarism if you include the relevant helpful key points here. (This message is mostly directed at people arriving here and seeking answers).
    – Tammi
    Sep 6 '20 at 17:23

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