191
  1. What do you call the -> operator as in the following?

    ->(...) do
      ...
    end
    
  2. Aren't the following snippets equivalent?

    succ = ->(x) {x + 1}
    succ = lambda {|x| x + 1}
    
  • 63
    It's annoying that you can't google "->" - good question to ask! – Kevin Jul 15 '13 at 23:08
  • 8
    @Kevin you can, however, use Stack Overflow's built-in Elastic Search to search for "->": title:"->" [ruby] is:question. The key is to use the quotation marks. – user456814 May 29 '14 at 21:43
  • 7
    Symbolhound can also do this: symbolhound.com/?q=-%3E+ruby – Andrew Grimm Jun 1 '14 at 1:52
  • 7
    annoying or not annoying, but googling for "ruby ->" request give link to this question as first top result. – fl-web Feb 23 '17 at 18:33
  • 3
    @Kevin maybe things have changed in the past 2 years, but googling ruby "->" is how I found this post :) – Nippysaurus May 29 '17 at 0:13
215

In Ruby Programming Language ("Methods, Procs, Lambdas, and Closures"), a lambda defined using -> is called lambda literal.

succ = ->(x){ x+1 }
succ.call(2)

The code is equivalent to the following one.

succ = lambda { |x| x + 1 }
succ.call(2)

Informally, I have heard it being called stabby lambda or stabby literal.

122

=> == Hash Rocket

Separates keys from values in a hash map literal.


-> == Dash Rocket

Used to define a lambda literal in Ruby 1.9.X (without args) and Ruby 2.X (with args). The examples you give (->(x) { x * 2 } & lambda { |x| x * 2 }) are in fact equivalent.

  • 7
    FYI The 2 styles aren't fully interchangeable if you use do/end because of precedence rules. This prints an inspected lambda: puts -> do 1 end. This passes the block to puts, stealing it from the lambda and causing an ArgumentError: puts lambda do 1 end – Kelvin Oct 6 '15 at 18:10
  • 1
    Also, ruby 1.9.3's lambda literals do allow arguments. – Kelvin Oct 6 '15 at 18:14
  • 2
    @Kelvin that would be because Ruby tries to interpret puts lambda do 1 end as puts(lambda) do 1 end rather than puts(lambda do 1 end). The latter does in fact work - Ruby just tries to pass the block to the puts method rather than the lambda method if there's no brackets. – PJSCopeland Mar 15 '17 at 3:28
  • 1
    @PJSCopeland I'm not saying you can't get them to act the same. I'm saying they aren't 100% interchangeable syntax-wise, i.e. you can't simply do a drop-in replacement in all cases (because sometimes you need extra parentheses for lambda). – Kelvin Mar 15 '17 at 22:16
  • @rdurand Did you make the edit with summary "Stabby lambdas cannot accept arguments in Ruby 1.9"? This is not accurate, at least for 1.9.3 - args are allowed. – Kelvin Mar 15 '17 at 22:27
3

Lambda rocket

I got that from this article. But first a google search for ruby lambda shorthand http://ruby-journal.com/becareful-with-space-in-lambda-hash-rocket-syntax-between-ruby-1-dot-9-and-2-dot-0/

  • for search terms suggestions +1 – akostadinov Mar 30 '18 at 12:39
1

->(x) { ... } is the same as lambda { |x| ... }. It creates a lambda. See Kernel#lambda A lambda is a type of proc, one that ensures the number of parameters passed to it is correct. See also Proc::new and Kernel#proc.

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