Basically when user resizes my application's window I want application to be same size when application is re-opened again.

At first I though of handling SizeChanged event and save Height and Width, but I think there must be easier solution.

Pretty simple problem, but I can not find easy solution to it.

  • 2
    Please note that if you're resoring both the size and the position (as most code samples below do), you'll want to handle the edge-case where someone unplugged the monitor that the window was last presented on, to avoid presenting your window off-screen. – Omer Raviv May 25 '12 at 9:31
  • @OmerRaviv Have you found an example taking the edge case in to account? – Andrew Truckle Jun 19 '16 at 21:28
  • I have too less repution to add a comment, hence I created this new awnser. I use the same solution as Lance Cleveland including the setting of RobJohnson, but it doesn't work if you use it for sub windows and want to open more of them at the same time... – AelanY May 7 '17 at 12:38

13 Answers 13

up vote 109 down vote accepted

Save the values in the user.config file.

You'll need to create the value in the settings file - it should be in the Properties folder. Create five values:

  • Top of type double
  • Left of type double
  • Height of type double
  • Width of type double
  • Maximized of type bool - to hold whether the window is maximized or not. If you want to store more information then a different type or structure will be needed.

Initialise the first two to 0 and the second two to the default size of your application, and the last one to false.

In the constructor:

this.Top = Properties.Settings.Default.Top;
this.Left = Properties.Settings.Default.Left;
this.Height = Properties.Settings.Default.Height;
this.Width = Properties.Settings.Default.Width;
// Very quick and dirty - but it does the job
if (Properties.Settings.Default.Maximized)
{
    WindowState = WindowState.Maximized;
}

Create a Window_Closing event handler and add the following:

if (WindowState == WindowState.Maximized)
{
    // Use the RestoreBounds as the current values will be 0, 0 and the size of the screen
    Properties.Settings.Default.Top = RestoreBounds.Top;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Left = RestoreBounds.Left;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Height = RestoreBounds.Height;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Width = RestoreBounds.Width;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Maximized = true;
}
else
{
    Properties.Settings.Default.Top = this.Top;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Left = this.Left;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Height = this.Height;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Width = this.Width;
    Properties.Settings.Default.Maximized = false;
}

Properties.Settings.Default.Save();

This will fail if the user makes the display area smaller - either by disconnecting a screen or changing the screen resolution - while the application is closed so you should add a check that the desired location and size is still valid before applying the values.

  • 5
    Actually, settings with scope "User" are not saved in the app.config file in Program Files, but in a user.config file in the user's application data directory. So it's not a problem... – Thomas Levesque May 11 '09 at 13:27
  • 6
    Actually you can add "WindowState" to settings. Select type -> browse -> PresentationFramework -> System.Windows -> WindowState :) – Martin Vseticka Aug 2 '10 at 9:40
  • 2
    FWIW, I do this from the size changed handler as well, in case of application crashes. They're rare with an unhandled exception processing, but why punish the user with lost size/location when they do mysteriously occur. – Thomas Sep 3 '10 at 18:01
  • 7
    There's a bug in this code in that, if the user opens the window on his/her second screen, then disconnects that screen from the computer, the next time they open the window, it will be presented off screen. If the window is modal, the user won't be able to interact with the app at all, and won't understand what's going on. You need to add a bounds check using Window.GetScreen(), after converting the screen coordinates to DPI dependant values. – Omer Raviv May 25 '12 at 9:09
  • 5
    Yeah @AlanBaljeu is right, this doesnt work on modern setups with multiple monitors. The only correct solution is to use this blogs.msdn.com/b/davidrickard/archive/2010/03/09/… – user3690202 Aug 20 '15 at 11:16

Actually you don't need to use code-behind to do that (except for saving the settings). You can use a custom markup extension to bind the window size and position to the settings like this :

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.Window1"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:my="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1"
        Title="Window1"
        Height="{my:SettingBinding Height}"
        Width="{my:SettingBinding Width}"
        Left="{my:SettingBinding Left}"
        Top="{my:SettingBinding Top}">

You can find the code for this markup extension here : http://www.thomaslevesque.com/2008/11/18/wpf-binding-to-application-settings-using-a-markup-extension/

  • 3
    I like this answer more than the chosen accepted answer. Well done. – moswald Feb 6 '10 at 16:40
  • 5
    +1 - I love the use of binding and extensions! If you add the WindowState to your bound settings, it provides the full capabilities. Alternatively, if you have the user settings available in the DataContext, you can use something like {Binding Settings.Height}, etc. – Matt DeKrey Dec 19 '10 at 20:19
  • 1
    this is far superior – Jake Berger Sep 21 '11 at 15:08
  • 3
    What about when people have two monitors and thus it might have negative coordinates and then they change monitor configurations and the values are no longer valid? – Andrew Truckle Jun 18 '16 at 20:08
  • 1
    @KyleDelaney yes, it works for user settings – Thomas Levesque Nov 1 '17 at 10:50

Just wrote a blog entry detailing how to do this in a simple and robust manner. It uses the GetWindowPlacement and SetWindowPlacement functions mentioned by Andy, but with some of the odd behavior he mentioned cleaned up:

https://engy.us/blog/2010/03/08/saving-window-size-and-location-in-wpf-and-winforms/

Here are some differences with other answers:

  • This code is aware of monitor changes, so it knows to move a window when a monitor is disconnected (so it's not stranded off screen).
  • It can also save the normal size of the window even when it's maximized, so it knows what to restore to when un-maximized.
  • It also consolidates the window state into a single string, which is easier to persist.
  • Code defines a class that can be used on one or more windows in your project by just hooking two events. Thus, it does not clutter any of your project files.
  • I tried the code of your blog. It runs ok, however the window placements I get are always empty. Any idea why? I use w.SourceInitialized += delegate and w.Closed += delegate. – Gerard Apr 30 '14 at 14:28
  • Turns out the handle to the window was 0 in the Closed event. Get the handle in SourceInitialized and then reuse in Closed. – Gerard May 1 '14 at 9:50
  • 2
    @Gerard If you use the Closing event as the blog entry instructs, you'll still have access to the window handle. – RandomEngy May 1 '14 at 16:32
  • 2
    Nice solution. However I just discovered that GetWindowPlacement/SetWindowPlacement are not Aero Snap aware – Mark Bell Oct 25 '15 at 18:55
  • 1
    @StéphaneGourichon This code is aware of monitor changes, so it knows to move a window when a monitor is disconnected (so it's not stranded off screen). It can also save the normal size of the window even when it's maximized, so it knows what to restore to when un-maximized. It also consolidates the window state into a single string, which is easier to persist. You could tweak the code to JSON serialize it instead if you don't like the XML dependency. – RandomEngy Mar 19 at 20:31

While you can "roll your own" and manually save the settings somewhere, and in general it will work, it is very easy to not handle all of the cases correctly. It is much better to let the OS do the work for you, by calling GetWindowPlacement() at exit and SetWindowPlacement() at startup. It handles all of the crazy edge cases that can occur (multiple monitors, save the normal size of the window if it is closed while maximized, etc.) so that you don't have to.

This MSDN Sample shows how to use these with a WPF app. The sample isn't perfect (the window will start in the upper left corner as small as possible on first run, and there is some odd behavior with the Settings designer saving a value of type WINDOWPLACEMENT), but it should at least get you started.

  • Nice solution. However I just discovered that GetWindowPlacement/SetWindowPlacement are not Aero Snap aware – Mark Bell Oct 25 '15 at 18:57
  • @RandomEngy has posted an improved answer based on this. – Stéphane Gourichon Mar 19 at 21:12

The "long form" binding that Thomas posted above requires almost no coding, just make sure you have the namespace binding:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.Window1"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:p="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1.Properties"
        Title="Window1"
        Height="{Binding Source={x:Static p:Settings.Default}, Path=Height, Mode=TwoWay}"
        Width="{Binding Source={x:Static p:Settings.Default}, Path=Width, Mode=TwoWay}"
        Left="{Binding Source={x:Static p:Settings.Default}, Path=Left, Mode=TwoWay}"
        Top="{Binding Source={x:Static p:Settings.Default}, Path=Top, Mode=TwoWay}">

Then to save on the code-behind:

private void frmMain_Closed(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Properties.Settings.Default.Save();
}
  • I chose this solution, but only saved the settings if the window state was normal, otherwise it can be fiddly getting it out of maximised mode – David Sykes Nov 23 '11 at 15:42
  • 7
    +1 I used this too, @DavidSykes - Adding another setting for the window state seems to work well enough, e.g. WindowState="{Binding Source={x:Static properties:Settings.Default}, Path=WindowState, Mode=TwoWay}" – RobJohnson Feb 13 '13 at 11:43
  • @RobJohnson I tried your suggestion and it worked very well, thanks. – David Sykes Mar 14 '13 at 9:40

Alternatively, you might like the following approach too (see source). Add the WindowSettings class to your project and insert WindowSettings.Save="True" in your main window's header:

<Window x:Class="YOURPROJECT.Views.ShellView"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:Services="clr-namespace:YOURNAMESPACE.Services" 
    Services:WindowSettings.Save="True">

Where WindowSettings is defined as follows:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Configuration;
using System.Windows;

namespace YOURNAMESPACE.Services
{
/// <summary>
///   Persists a Window's Size, Location and WindowState to UserScopeSettings
/// </summary>
public class WindowSettings
{
    #region Fields

    /// <summary>
    ///   Register the "Save" attached property and the "OnSaveInvalidated" callback
    /// </summary>
    public static readonly DependencyProperty SaveProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Save", typeof (bool), typeof (WindowSettings), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(OnSaveInvalidated));

    private readonly Window mWindow;

    private WindowApplicationSettings mWindowApplicationSettings;

    #endregion Fields

    #region Constructors

    public WindowSettings(Window pWindow) { mWindow = pWindow; }

    #endregion Constructors

    #region Properties

    [Browsable(false)] public WindowApplicationSettings Settings {
        get {
            if (mWindowApplicationSettings == null) mWindowApplicationSettings = CreateWindowApplicationSettingsInstance();
            return mWindowApplicationSettings;
        }
    }

    #endregion Properties

    #region Methods

    public static void SetSave(DependencyObject pDependencyObject, bool pEnabled) { pDependencyObject.SetValue(SaveProperty, pEnabled); }

    protected virtual WindowApplicationSettings CreateWindowApplicationSettingsInstance() { return new WindowApplicationSettings(this); }

    /// <summary>
    ///   Load the Window Size Location and State from the settings object
    /// </summary>
    protected virtual void LoadWindowState() {
        Settings.Reload();
        if (Settings.Location != Rect.Empty) {
            mWindow.Left = Settings.Location.Left;
            mWindow.Top = Settings.Location.Top;
            mWindow.Width = Settings.Location.Width;
            mWindow.Height = Settings.Location.Height;
        }
        if (Settings.WindowState != WindowState.Maximized) mWindow.WindowState = Settings.WindowState;
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///   Save the Window Size, Location and State to the settings object
    /// </summary>
    protected virtual void SaveWindowState() {
        Settings.WindowState = mWindow.WindowState;
        Settings.Location = mWindow.RestoreBounds;
        Settings.Save();
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///   Called when Save is changed on an object.
    /// </summary>
    private static void OnSaveInvalidated(DependencyObject pDependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs pDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs) {
        var window = pDependencyObject as Window;
        if (window != null)
            if ((bool) pDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs.NewValue) {
                var settings = new WindowSettings(window);
                settings.Attach();
            }
    }

    private void Attach() {
        if (mWindow != null) {
            mWindow.Closing += WindowClosing;
            mWindow.Initialized += WindowInitialized;
            mWindow.Loaded += WindowLoaded;
        }
    }

    private void WindowClosing(object pSender, CancelEventArgs pCancelEventArgs) { SaveWindowState(); }

    private void WindowInitialized(object pSender, EventArgs pEventArgs) { LoadWindowState(); }

    private void WindowLoaded(object pSender, RoutedEventArgs pRoutedEventArgs) { if (Settings.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized) mWindow.WindowState = Settings.WindowState; }

    #endregion Methods

    #region Nested Types

    public class WindowApplicationSettings : ApplicationSettingsBase
    {
        #region Constructors

        public WindowApplicationSettings(WindowSettings pWindowSettings) { }

        #endregion Constructors

        #region Properties

        [UserScopedSetting] public Rect Location {
            get {
                if (this["Location"] != null) return ((Rect) this["Location"]);
                return Rect.Empty;
            }
            set { this["Location"] = value; }
        }

        [UserScopedSetting] public WindowState WindowState {
            get {
                if (this["WindowState"] != null) return (WindowState) this["WindowState"];
                return WindowState.Normal;
            }
            set { this["WindowState"] = value; }
        }

        #endregion Properties
    }

    #endregion Nested Types
}
}

This is the most elegant solution that I've seen over the internet. Check this out:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/davidrickard/archive/2010/03/09/saving-window-size-and-location-in-wpf-and-winforms.aspx

It works for WPF and for WinForms too.

  • 1
    Maybe it works well, but a bunch of native bindings and XML conversions is as far from elegant as you get. – Glenn Maynard May 24 '14 at 3:21
  • This was an old post. Since then I had to make it differently. I implemented a mechanism that can be used from any window to save the state of a window (OnClosing) and restore it (OnSourceInitialized). The stored info is saved in Windows Registry under the current user scope. – Alexandru Dicu May 27 '14 at 4:37
  • @AlexandruDicu can you share your new implementation? – Stéphane Gourichon Mar 19 at 17:02

The default way of solving it is to use settings files. The problem with settings files is that you have to define all the settings and write the code that copies data back and forth yourself. Quite tedious if you have a lot of properties to keep track of.

I made a pretty flexible and very easy to use library for this, you just tell it which properties of which object to track and it does the rest. You can configure the crap out of it too if you like.

The library is called Jot (github), here is an old CodeProject article I wrote about it.

Here's how you'd use it to keep track of a window's size and location:

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    _stateTracker.Configure(this)
        .IdentifyAs("MyMainWindow")
        .AddProperties(nameof(Height), nameof(Width), nameof(Left), nameof(Top), nameof(WindowState))
        .RegisterPersistTrigger(nameof(Closed))
        .Apply();
}

Jot vs. settings files: With Jot there's considerably less code, and it's a lot less error prone since you only need to mention each property once. With settings files you need to mention each property 5 times: once when you explicitly create the property and an additional four times in the code that copies the values back and forth.

Storage, serialization etc are completely configurable. Also, when using IOC, you can even hook it up so that it applies tracking automatically to all objects it resolves so that all you need to do to make a property persistent is slap a [Trackable] attribute on it.

I'm writing all this because I think the library is top notch and I want to mouth off about it.

  • I like it ! thanks – cdie Mar 31 '17 at 6:04
  • Nice, thanks for this - I've used your code snippet in a new class to set up the state tracker with a path based on the program's name. From now on I only have to write one line and all the window properties are handled – Awesomeness Aug 2 '17 at 20:24

I wrote a quick class which does this. Here is how it's called:

    public MainWindow()
    {
        FormSizeSaver.RegisterForm(this, () => Settings.Default.MainWindowSettings,
                                   s =>
                                   {
                                       Settings.Default.MainWindowSettings = s;
                                       Settings.Default.Save();
                                   });
        InitializeComponent();
        ...

And here is the code:

public class FormSizeSaver
{
    private readonly Window window;
    private readonly Func<FormSizeSaverSettings> getSetting;
    private readonly Action<FormSizeSaverSettings> saveSetting;
    private FormSizeSaver(Window window, Func<string> getSetting, Action<string> saveSetting)
    {
        this.window = window;
        this.getSetting = () => FormSizeSaverSettings.FromString(getSetting());
        this.saveSetting = s => saveSetting(s.ToString());

        window.Initialized += InitializedHandler;
        window.StateChanged += StateChangedHandler;
        window.SizeChanged += SizeChangedHandler;
        window.LocationChanged += LocationChangedHandler;
    }

    public static FormSizeSaver RegisterForm(Window window, Func<string> getSetting, Action<string> saveSetting)
    {
        return new FormSizeSaver(window, getSetting, saveSetting);
    }


    private void SizeChangedHandler(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var s = getSetting();
        s.Height = e.NewSize.Height;
        s.Width = e.NewSize.Width;
        saveSetting(s);
    }

    private void StateChangedHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var s = getSetting();
        if (window.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized)
        {
            if (!s.Maximized)
            {
                s.Maximized = true;
                saveSetting(s);
            }
        }
        else if (window.WindowState == WindowState.Normal)
        {
            if (s.Maximized)
            {
                s.Maximized = false;
                saveSetting(s);
            }
        }
    }

    private void InitializedHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var s = getSetting();
        window.WindowState = s.Maximized ? WindowState.Maximized : WindowState.Normal;

        if (s.Height != 0 && s.Width != 0)
        {
            window.Height = s.Height;
            window.Width = s.Width;
            window.WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.Manual;
            window.Left = s.XLoc;
            window.Top = s.YLoc;
        }
    }

    private void LocationChangedHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var s = getSetting();
        s.XLoc = window.Left;
        s.YLoc = window.Top;
        saveSetting(s);
    }
}

[Serializable]
internal class FormSizeSaverSettings
{
    public double Height, Width, YLoc, XLoc;
    public bool Maximized;

    public override string ToString()
    {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            var bf = new BinaryFormatter();
            bf.Serialize(ms, this);
            ms.Position = 0;
            byte[] buffer = new byte[(int)ms.Length];
            ms.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            return Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);
        }
    }

    internal static FormSizeSaverSettings FromString(string value)
    {
        try
        {
            using (var ms = new MemoryStream(Convert.FromBase64String(value)))
            {
                var bf = new BinaryFormatter();
                return (FormSizeSaverSettings) bf.Deserialize(ms);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return new FormSizeSaverSettings();
        }
    }
}
  • window.Intitialized should be window.Loaded see mostlytech.blogspot.com/2008/01/… – Gleb Sevruk Jul 9 '14 at 13:08
  • @Gleb, both work I think. Are you having problems with it on Initialized? – tster Jul 9 '14 at 14:38
  • Yes, since maximized window will be on incorrect screen if you use only initialized event. What I've done and this seems to work: Now I'm subscribing to Loaded event also. I moved _window.WindowState = s.Maximized ? WindowState.Maximized : WindowState.Normal; line inside "Loaded" event handler. window.Initialized += InitializedHandler; window.Loaded += LoadedHandler; btw: I like this approach – Gleb Sevruk Jul 9 '14 at 16:37

You might like this:

public class WindowStateHelper
{
    public static string ToXml(System.Windows.Window win)
    {
        XElement bounds = new XElement("Bounds");
        if (win.WindowState == System.Windows.WindowState.Maximized)
        {
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Top", win.RestoreBounds.Top));
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Left", win.RestoreBounds.Left));
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Height", win.RestoreBounds.Height));
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Width", win.RestoreBounds.Width));
        }
        else
        {
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Top", win.Top));
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Left", win.Left));
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Height", win.Height));
            bounds.Add(new XElement("Width", win.Width));
        }
        XElement root = new XElement("WindowState",
            new XElement("State", win.WindowState.ToString()),
            new XElement("Visibility", win.Visibility.ToString()),
            bounds);

        return root.ToString();
    }

    public static void FromXml(string xml, System.Windows.Window win)
    {
        try
        {
            XElement root = XElement.Parse(xml);
            string state = root.Descendants("State").FirstOrDefault().Value;
            win.WindowState = (System.Windows.WindowState)Enum.Parse(typeof(System.Windows.WindowState), state);

            state = root.Descendants("Visibility").FirstOrDefault().Value;
            win.Visibility = (System.Windows.Visibility)Enum.Parse(typeof(System.Windows.Visibility), state);

            XElement bounds = root.Descendants("Bounds").FirstOrDefault();
            win.Top = Convert.ToDouble(bounds.Element("Top").Value);
            win.Left = Convert.ToDouble(bounds.Element("Left").Value);
            win.Height = Convert.ToDouble(bounds.Element("Height").Value);
            win.Width = Convert.ToDouble(bounds.Element("Width").Value);
        }
        catch (Exception x)
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine(x.ToString());
        }
    }
}

When the app closes:

        Properties.Settings.Default.Win1Placement = WindowStateHelper.ToXml(win1);
        Properties.Settings.Default.Win2Placement = WindowStateHelper.ToXml(win2);
        ...

When the app starts:

        WindowStateHelper.FromXml(Properties.Settings.Default.Win1Placement, win1);
        WindowStateHelper.FromXml(Properties.Settings.Default.Win2Placement, win2);
        ...

Create a string named WindowXml in your default Settings.

Use this extension method on your Window Loaded and Closing events to restore and save Window size and location.

using YourProject.Properties;
using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows;
using System.Xml.Linq;

namespace YourProject.Extensions
{
    public static class WindowExtensions
    {
        public static void SaveSizeAndLocation(this Window w)
        {
            try
            {
                var s = "<W>";
                s += GetNode("Top", w.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized ? w.RestoreBounds.Top : w.Top);
                s += GetNode("Left", w.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized ? w.RestoreBounds.Left : w.Left);
                s += GetNode("Height", w.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized ? w.RestoreBounds.Height : w.Height);
                s += GetNode("Width", w.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized ? w.RestoreBounds.Width : w.Width);
                s += GetNode("WindowState", w.WindowState);
                s += "</W>";

                Settings.Default.WindowXml = s;
                Settings.Default.Save();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
            }
        }

        public static void RestoreSizeAndLocation(this Window w)
        {
            try
            {
                var xd = XDocument.Parse(Settings.Default.WindowXml);
                w.WindowState = (WindowState)Enum.Parse(typeof(WindowState), xd.Descendants("WindowState").FirstOrDefault().Value);
                w.Top = Convert.ToDouble(xd.Descendants("Top").FirstOrDefault().Value);
                w.Left = Convert.ToDouble(xd.Descendants("Left").FirstOrDefault().Value);
                w.Height = Convert.ToDouble(xd.Descendants("Height").FirstOrDefault().Value);
                w.Width = Convert.ToDouble(xd.Descendants("Width").FirstOrDefault().Value);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
            }
        }

        private static string GetNode(string name, object value)
        {
            return string.Format("<{0}>{1}</{0}>", name, value);
        }
    }
}

There's a NuGet Project RestoreWindowPlace see on github that does all this for you, saving the information in an XML file.

To get it to work on a window, it's as simple as calling:

((App)Application.Current).WindowPlace.Register(this, "MainWindow");

In App you create the class that manages your windows. See the github link above for more information.

I'm using the answer from Lance Cleveland and bind the Setting. But i'm using some more Code to avoid that my Window is out of Screen.

private void SetWindowSettingsIntoScreenArea()
{
    // first detect Screen, where we will display the Window
    // second correct bottom and right position
    // then the top and left position.
    // If Size is bigger than current Screen, it's still possible to move and size the Window

    // get the screen to display the window
    var screen = System.Windows.Forms.Screen.FromPoint(new System.Drawing.Point((int)Default.Left, (int)Default.Top));

    // is bottom position out of screen for more than 1/3 Height of Window?
    if (Default.Top + (Default.Height / 3) > screen.WorkingArea.Height)
        Default.Top = screen.WorkingArea.Height - Default.Height;

    // is right position out of screen for more than 1/2 Width of Window?
    if (Default.Left + (Default.Width / 2) > screen.WorkingArea.Width)
        Default.Left = screen.WorkingArea.Width - Default.Width;

    // is top position out of screen?
    if (Default.Top < screen.WorkingArea.Top)
        Default.Top = screen.WorkingArea.Top;

    // is left position out of screen?
    if (Default.Left < screen.WorkingArea.Left)
        Default.Left = screen.WorkingArea.Left;
}

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