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I want to create a python program which splits up a files into segments of specified width, and then a consumer program takes the segments and creates a duplicate of the original file. The segments might be out of order so I intent to use the offset value to write to the file. Is there a way I can achieve this with without creating a local array to hold all the data on the receiving end?

for example,

f = open(file, "wb")
f.seek(offset)
f.write(data)

The idea behind this is that the program that sends the file might not be able to finish sending the file, and will resume again once it has started. I have a sample code below which the "combine_bytes" function throws an exception when I try placing data in the buffer location.

import sys
import os

def SplitFile(fname, start, end, width):
    t_fileSize = os.path.getsize(fname)
    buffData = bytearray(t_fileSize)
    for line, offset in get_bytes(fname, int(start), int(end), int(width)): 
    combine_bytes(buffData, offset, line, width)        
        nums = ["%02x" % ord(c) for c in line]
        print " ".join(nums)

    f = open("Green_copy.jpg", "wb")
    f.write(buffData)
    f.close()


def combine_bytes(in_buff, in_offset, in_data, in_width):
    #something like memcpy would be nice
    #in_buff[in_offset:in_offset + in_width] = in_data

    #this works but it's the mother of inefficiency 
    i = in_offset
    for c in in_data:
        in_buff.insert(i, c)
        i  = i + 1


def get_bytes(fname, start, end, width):
    t_currOffset = start
    t_width = width
    f = open(fname, "r+b")

    if end != 0:
    while t_currOffset < end:
        f.seek(t_currOffset)
        if (t_currOffset + t_width) > end:
            t_width = end - t_currOffset
        t_data = f.read(t_width)
        yield t_data,t_currOffset
        t_currOffset += t_width
    else:   
    f.seek(t_currOffset)
    t_data = f.read(t_width)
    while t_data:
        yield t_data, t_currOffset
        t_currOffset += t_width
        f.seek(t_currOffset)
        t_data = f.read(t_width)

    f.close()


if __name__ == '__main__':
    try:
    SplitFile(*sys.argv[1:5])
    except:
    print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0]
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  • Thabk you for adding more information. There are now a couple indentation errors on your code that make it difficult to understand or test. (Like the combine_bytes call inside the first for - it should be indented another level)
    – jsbueno
    Dec 12, 2011 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

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I still could nt figure out what is your intent - but this version of combine_bytes will get rid of your "mother of your inefficiency" part (which actually is exactly that)

def combine_bytes(in_buff, in_offset, in_data, in_width):
    #something like memcpy would be nice
    #in_buff[in_offset:in_offset + in_width] = in_data

    in_buff = in_buff[:in_offset] + in_data + in_buff[in_offset:] 
    return in_buff

Of course this creates a new (larger) buffer for each call, and you have to replace your buffer on the caller scope with the one returned:

buffData = combine_bytes(buffData, offset, line, width)

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  • I'm sorry I thought I was clear. Which part is unclear? And your code did the trick thanks!
    – ArmenB
    Dec 12, 2011 at 20:18
  • Actually, when I shuffled the lines, this code attached in the wrong order as well. code code
    – ArmenB
    Dec 12, 2011 at 21:16
  • Found it. here is a better way which produces the what I wanted and is faster. _buffData[t_offset:t_offset + len(t_data)] = bytearray(t_data)
    – ArmenB
    Dec 13, 2011 at 23:29
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Found it. here is a better way which produces the what I wanted and is faster. _buffData[t_offset:t_offset + len(t_data)] = bytearray(t_data)

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