309

I'm trying to make a Python program that interfaces with a different crashy process (that's out of my hands). Unfortunately the program I'm interfacing with doesn't even crash reliably! So I want to make a quick C++ program that crashes on purpose but I don't actually know the best and shortest way to do that, does anyone know what to put between my:

int main() {
    crashyCodeGoesHere();
}

to make my C++ program crash reliably

  • 3
    you can use inline assembly to attempt to execute privleged instructions: asm { cli; }; – Nate Koppenhaver Dec 13 '11 at 18:19
  • @aitchnyu I think there is a difference in the usability of the answers to each question. (FYI: I've not voted anything for either question) – Andrew Barber Dec 13 '11 at 20:36
  • any comment of throwing exception while one already propogates?? plz chk my answer below anc comment – Abhinav Dec 20 '11 at 17:38
  • 3
    Redis uses the following *((char*)-1) = 'x'; code to induce a crash in order to debug read more in my answer here – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 16 '14 at 14:45
  • I found this question searching for a test case for a crash reporting system. I needed to force a crash during normal runtime to invoke the crash reporter and stack dump sending. Thanks! – Cory Trese Oct 7 '16 at 15:14

29 Answers 29

252

The abort() function is probably your best bet. It's part of the C standard library, and is defined as "causing abnormal program termination" (e.g, a fatal error or crash).

  • 13
    Note that a crash through abort() doesn't call any destructors or atexit functions, though that will likely not matter here. – Xeo Dec 12 '11 at 23:02
  • 135
    @Xeo: If it did call destructors and atexits, it wouldn't be a crash now would it? – Donal Fellows Dec 13 '11 at 18:00
  • 17
    @Donal: Fair point. – Xeo Dec 13 '11 at 21:17
  • Since abort() is the correct answer, then should 'exit(-1);` be acceptable? – asir6 Dec 19 '11 at 7:51
  • 8
    No, since it doesn't cause a crash, merely reports something couldn't be done. – boatcoder Jul 2 '12 at 3:29
113

Try:

raise(SIGSEGV);  // simulates a standard crash when access invalid memory
                 // ie anything that can go wrong with pointers.

Found in:

#include <signal.h>
  • 1
    I nelieve whether or not this terminates is implementation-defined... – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 12 '11 at 22:54
  • 3
    It's more than just implementation-defined -- the signal can be caught with signal(). Most sane applications don't, though. – duskwuff Dec 12 '11 at 22:56
  • 12
    It will crash in exactly the same way as a normal SIGSEGV within the application (which is the way most applications crash). It is well defined what it does (by default it exits the application and generates a core file). Yes you can set a handler, but if you have one don't you want to test that in the same way!! – Martin York Dec 13 '11 at 4:11
  • 1
    +1 for raise(). This lets you test for a ton of different types of exceptions by just changing the argument. – AlexWebr Dec 13 '11 at 5:06
  • 2
    favorite solution, however it is platform dependent . – Nadim Farhat Feb 5 '14 at 13:50
73

Dividing by zero will crash the application:

int main()
{
    return 1 / 0;
}
  • 4
    This one works across most languages. – Jesse Aldridge Dec 16 '11 at 6:44
  • 26
    Depending on how clever your compiler is this will be caught at compile time. I know that visual studio 2008 won't compile this for c++ or c#. – AidanO Jan 3 '12 at 16:05
  • 7
    (1/0); will work also :) – totten Aug 8 '12 at 12:54
  • 2
    iirc it does not crashes on arm – sherpya Mar 30 '15 at 17:04
  • 11
    For K&R's sake, stop writing void main() already! – alecov Jan 26 '16 at 12:54
63
*((unsigned int*)0) = 0xDEAD;
  • 52
    This is not guaranteed to crash. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 4:55
  • 8
    @Windowsprogrammer: no, it's not guaranteed. But which sane OS doesn't stop an application that tries to access memory at address 0? – Joachim Sauer Dec 13 '11 at 6:55
  • 29
    "But which sane OS doesn't stop an application that tries to access memory at address 0?" -- That isn't really what you want to ask, but I'll answer anyway. In some computers there is RAM at address 0, and it is perfectly meaningful for a program to store a value there. A more meaningful question would be "Which OS doesn't stop an application that access memory at the address that a C++ implementation reserved for a null pointer?" In that case I don't know of any. But the original program is about the C++ language not about OSes. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 7:41
  • 6
    Its undefined behavior. It is perfectly OK for this to do nothing. A machine that will not crash: Anything running a Z80 series processor (I assume (my Z80a does nothing)). – Martin York Dec 13 '11 at 9:10
  • 26
    Although this isn't guaranteed to crash, it is one of the most common kinds of crash in C++. So if you want to simulate a crash, this is an "authentic" way to do it :) – Chris Burt-Brown Dec 13 '11 at 10:03
51

Well, are we on stackoverflow, or not?

for (long long int i = 0; ++i; (&i)[i] = i);

(Not guaranteed to crash by any standards, but neither are any of the suggested answers including the accepted one since SIGABRT could have been caught anyway. In practice, this will crash everywhere.)

  • 4
    I can see that being funny on a system with non protected code pages and you overwrite your program with some code that is accidentally an infinite loop that does nothing. Highly highly highly highly unlikely but potentially possible. – Martin York Dec 13 '11 at 17:32
  • @Loki: What if it just read from every 4000th byte? Would that be less likely to crash? Definitely less dangerous. – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '11 at 17:43
  • 68
    That crashing algorithm isn't O(1)! – Anton Barkovsky Dec 13 '11 at 17:44
  • @MooingDuck: I am just making a funny comment. Don't take it that seriously :-) But it would be interesting if somebody found a a sequence of instructions that did something funny. – Martin York Dec 13 '11 at 17:52
  • 1
    @LokiAstari: you're absolutely right. I was thinking about (&i)[i] += !i instead, but I feared the compiler might be clever enough and want to optimise that out. :-) – sam hocevar Dec 13 '11 at 17:54
35
 throw 42;

Just the answer... :)

  • 1
    Windows. GCC-5.4.0. Exit code: 3. No error message box. Console message: "terminate called after throwing an instance of 'int' This application has requested the Runtime to terminate it in an unusual way. Please contact the application's support team for more information.". – Vadzim Jul 3 '18 at 15:02
15

assert(false); is pretty good too.

According to ISO/IEC 9899:1999 it is guaranteed to crash when NDEBUG is not defined:

If NDEBUG is defined [...] the assert macro is defined simply as

#define assert(ignore) ((void)0)

The assert macro is redefined according to the current state of NDEBUG each time that is included.

[...]

The assert macro puts diagnostic tests into programs; [...] if expression (which shall have a scalar type) is false [...]. It then calls the abort function.

  • I vaguely remember VC 2005 behaving differently between debug and release with asserts? – Tom Kerr Dec 12 '11 at 22:30
  • 8
    @Tom assert is made equivalent to ((void)0) in Release mode. – Seth Carnegie Dec 12 '11 at 22:31
  • 2
    @SethCarnegie Dont see whats wrong with this - only if the define NDEBUG defined will is not crash? Dans answer was pretty fair IMHO. – Adrian Cornish Dec 13 '11 at 5:04
  • @AdrianCornish I was only answering Tom Kerr's question, not saying this answer was wrong. I didn't downvote this answer. – Seth Carnegie Dec 13 '11 at 11:49
  • 3
    I don't know why he would do a "release" build of this test code. – Joel B Dec 13 '11 at 20:32
11

Since a crash is a symptom of invoking undefined behaviour, and since invoking undefined behaviour can lead to anything, including a crash, I don't think you want to really crash your program, but just have it drop into a debugger. The most portable way to do so is probably abort().

While raise(SIGABRT) has the same effect, it is certainly more to write. Both ways however can be intercepted by installing a signal handler for SIGABRT. So depending on your situation, you might want/need to raise another signal. SIGFPE, SIGILL, SIGINT, SIGTERM or SIGSEGV might be the way to go, but they all can be intercepted.

When you can be unportable, your choices might be even broader, like using SIGBUS on linux.

  • 1
    I really doubt that he wants a debugger involved. He seems to want to test what happens when the caller of a crashing program gets a crash sent his way. Which is very reasonable. – Donal Fellows Dec 13 '11 at 18:03
9

The only flash I had is abort() function:

It aborts the process with an abnormal program termination.It generates the SIGABRT signal, which by default causes the program to terminate returning an unsuccessful termination error code to the host environment.The program is terminated without executing destructors for objects of automatic or static storage duration, and without calling any atexit( which is called by exit() before the program terminates)function. It never returns to its caller.

9

The answer is platform specific and depends on your goals. But here's the Mozilla Javascript crash function, which I think illustrates a lot of the challenges to making this work:

static JS_NEVER_INLINE void
CrashInJS()
{
    /*
     * We write 123 here so that the machine code for this function is
     * unique. Otherwise the linker, trying to be smart, might use the
     * same code for CrashInJS and for some other function. That
     * messes up the signature in minidumps.
     */

#if defined(WIN32)
    /*
     * We used to call DebugBreak() on Windows, but amazingly, it causes
     * the MSVS 2010 debugger not to be able to recover a call stack.
     */
    *((int *) NULL) = 123;
    exit(3);
#elif defined(__APPLE__)
    /*
     * On Mac OS X, Breakpad ignores signals. Only real Mach exceptions are
     * trapped.
     */
    *((int *) NULL) = 123;  /* To continue from here in GDB: "return" then "continue". */
    raise(SIGABRT);  /* In case above statement gets nixed by the optimizer. */
#else
    raise(SIGABRT);  /* To continue from here in GDB: "signal 0". */
#endif
}
  • 1
    You should totally drop that and use jQuery instead. – Thomas Weller Jul 26 '16 at 21:01
  • This is undefined behavior and is not guaranteed to crash. Often compilers assume undefined behavior to be unreachable. In that case at least the crashing line is going to be deleted and other code might be as well. – usr Sep 27 '16 at 18:44
8

I see there are many answers posted here that will fall into lucky cases to get the job done, but none of them are 100% deterministic to crash. Some will crash on one hardware and OS, the others would not. However, there is a standard way as per official C++ standard to make it crash.

Quoting from C++ Standard ISO/IEC 14882 §15.1-7:

If the exception handling mechanism, after completing the initialization of the exception object but before the activation of a handler for the exception, calls a function that exits via an exception, std::terminate is called (15.5.1).

struct C {
    C() { }
    C(const C&) {
        if (std::uncaught_exceptions()) {
            throw 0; // throw during copy to handler’s exception-declaration object (15.3)
        }
    }
};
int main() {
    try {
    throw C(); // calls std::terminate() if construction of the handler’s
    // exception-declaration object is not elided (12.8)
    } catch(C) { }
}

I have written a small code to demonstrate this and can be found and tried on Ideone here.

class MyClass{
    public:
    ~MyClass() throw(int) { throw 0;}
};

int main() {
  try {
    MyClass myobj; // its destructor will cause an exception

    // This is another exception along with exception due to destructor of myobj and will cause app to terminate
     throw 1;      // It could be some function call which can result in exception.
  }
  catch(...)
  {
    std::cout<<"Exception catched"<<endl;
  }
  return 0;
}

ISO/IEC 14882 §15.1/9 mentions throw without try block resulting in implicit call to abort:

If no exception is presently being handled, executing a throw-expression with no operand calls std::terminate()

Others include : throw from destructor: ISO/IEC 14882 §15.2/3

6

This one is missing:

int main = 42;
  • 3
    does it link even? – lang2 Jul 18 '13 at 4:52
  • 1
    Yes it does; but it does something spectacular when you run it. – Joshua Jan 21 '16 at 0:36
5
*( ( char* ) NULL ) = 0;

This will produce a segmentation fault.

  • 9
    This is not guaranteed to crash. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 4:55
  • 1
    What will happen instead? – Giorgio Dec 13 '11 at 6:34
  • 23
    "What will happen instead?" -- Anything could happen instead. Behaviour is undefined, so the implementation could assign 0 to one of your program's variables, or it could assign 42 to one of your program's variables, or it could format your hard drive and continue executing your program. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 7:38
  • 7
    (continuing "Windows programmer" set of mind) It can make you computer explode, or it may cause it to come a live and take over the humanity. or... it will crash in 99.9% and it's defined as "undefined behavior" because no one wants to take responsibility on it. – Roee Gavirel Dec 14 '11 at 6:38
  • 2
    @cha0site: It is guaranteed to be undefined behavior by the Standard, because that is dereferencing a null pointer. Whatever behavior you observed on Linux is allowable under the umbrella of "undefined behavior" – Ben Voigt May 12 '13 at 7:28
5

What about stack overflow by a dead loop recursive method call?

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void main()
{
    StackOverflow(0);
}

void StackOverflow(int depth)
{
    char blockdata[10000];
    printf("Overflow: %d\n", depth);
    StackOverflow(depth+1);
}

See Original example on Microsoft KB

  • 4
    What would prevent a Sufficiently Smart Compiler from optimizing away both the unused stack allocation and the tail call? – JB. Dec 14 '11 at 14:47
  • @JB: unfortunatly have no idea because not familar with existing compilers optimization logic – sll Dec 14 '11 at 15:43
  • 8
    Well, compiled here with gcc 4.6.0 at optimization levels -O2 and above, it optimizes just fine. It needs -O1 or lower to segfault. – JB. Dec 14 '11 at 16:06
  • @Abhinav: Just post your answer with all of these ways expressed as an examples in C++ :) – sll May 23 '13 at 9:20
5

This crashes on my Linux system, because string literals are stored in read only memory:

0[""]--;

By the way, g++ refuses to compile this. Compilers are getting smarter and smarter :)

4
int i = 1 / 0;

Your compiler will probably warn you about this, but it compiles just fine under GCC 4.4.3 This will probably cause a SIGFPE (floating-point exception), which perhaps is not as likely in a real application as SIGSEGV (memory segmentation violation) as the other answers cause, but it's still a crash. In my opinion, this is much more readable.

Another way, if we're going to cheat and use signal.h, is:

#include <signal.h>
int main() {
    raise(SIGKILL);
}

This is guaranteed to kill the subprocess, to contrast with SIGSEGV.

  • 1
    This is not guaranteed to crash. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 4:57
  • 11
    The C++ language does not guarantee that 1 / 0 will cause a SIGFPE. Behaviour is undefined. The implementation could say the result is 42. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 5:09
  • 1
    When behaviour is undefined, the implementation can do whatever it wants. The C++ language neither prevents nor requires an implementation to write a crash dump, the C++ language neither prevents nor requires an implementation to assign 42, etc. – Windows programmer Dec 13 '11 at 7:43
  • 2
    @Giorgio if the hardware doesn't have some way of trapping it automatically you still force compilers to emit at least two instructions, one of which would be a branch too. That's approximately doubling the cost of a division. Everybody pays that cost like that. If it's optional and you want it you can always use a library function for it still. If it's not optional and you don't want it you'd still end up paying the cost. – Flexo Dec 13 '11 at 10:09
  • 2
    @Giorgio: I have an application that does a 100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 * 10^1000000 divisions. I know for a fact that 0 of these will be a division by zero though there is no way the compiler can know this. I definitely do not want the compiler to plant the check for a division by zero. – Martin York Dec 17 '11 at 6:44
4

This is a more guaranteed version of abort presented in above answers.It takes care of the situation when sigabrt is blocked.You can infact use any signal instead of abort that has the default action of crashing the program.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<signal.h>
#include<unistd.h> 
#include<stdlib.h>
int main()
{
    sigset_t act;
    sigemptyset(&act);
    sigfillset(&act);
    sigprocmask(SIG_UNBLOCK,&act,NULL);
    abort();
}
3
int* p=0;
*p=0;

This should crash too. On Windows it crashes with AccessViolation and it should do the same on all OS-es I guess.

  • 5
    on all OS-es No, it doesn't crash in non protected OS (e.g. MS-DOS.) Actually, sometimes there is something in address 0! For x86 real mode, Interrupt Vector Table is in address 0. – ikh Aug 14 '14 at 10:28
3

This is the snippet provided by Google in Breakpad.

  volatile int* a = reinterpret_cast<volatile int*>(NULL);
  *a = 1;
  • 1
    Since I'm testing Breakpad this is exactly what I wanted! I found that some Breakpad minidumps don't produce a stack trace that points to the line in my code causing the crash. This one does, so I can use it as good p.o.c. test. – BuvinJ Feb 21 '18 at 14:48
2
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *buf=NULL;buf[0]=0;
    return 0;
}
2

Although this question already has an accepted answer...

void main(){
    throw 1;
}

Or... void main(){throw 1;}

2

Writing to a read-only memory will cause segmentation fault unless your system don't support read-only memory blocks.

int main() {
    (int&)main = 0;
}

I have tested it with MingGW 5.3.0 on Windows 7 and GCC on Linux Mint. I suppose that other compilers and systems will give a similar effect.

1

Or another way since we're on the band wagon.

A lovely piece of infinite recursion. Guaranteed to blow your stack.

int main(int argv, char* argc)
{
   return main(argv, argc)
}

Prints out:

Segmentation fault (core dumped)

  • 13
    Calling main yourself is actually undefined behavior, in case you didn't know :) Also, tail recursion is not guaranteed to blow your stack. If you want a "guarantee", you have to do something after the recursive call, otherwise the compiler could optimize the recursion into an infinite loop. – fredoverflow Sep 27 '12 at 5:53
0

One that has not been mentioned yet:

((void(*)())0)();

This will treat the null pointer as a function pointer and then call it. Just like most methods, this is not guaranteed to crash the program, but the chances of the OS allowing this to go unchecked and of the program ever returning are negligible.

  • 3
    I know several machines that this will cause a re-boot as the OS startup code is effectively mapped to the address 0. Don't assume that everything will work like your PC. You could say that was a crash but it is not very useful as you can not debug it as all state is wiped at startup. – Martin York Dec 13 '11 at 20:15
  • @Loki Astari: I will none the less say that this is a crash -- if this can cause it, then the program being debugged may as well, meaning it's as good a test as any. On the other hand, I am curious which of these machines can run Python. – Anton Golov Dec 13 '11 at 23:34
  • I think you missed the point. I have seen OS code at 0. Does not mean there are not systems with normal good code to run that will work just fine at 0. Or the bytes at 0 could just as easily be the opcode for return. – Martin York Dec 14 '11 at 17:39
  • I am aware of OS code at 0; that's one of the reasons I strongly doubt that the bytes at 0 would be the opcode for return. The program is quite clearly not executing any more, and did not exit in the usual way, i.e. it crashed -- if this is not good enough for the asker, I expect him to comment on it himself. – Anton Golov Dec 14 '11 at 17:57
  • 2
    You are aware of the OS code for your machine only. What I am trying to say is that it may fail for you. But that means nothing. There are lots of systems out there. I am sure that some of them this may work (i.e. as in not crash). Relying on machine/OS specific behavior is a bad idea and causes maintenance problems in the long run. The idea of the site is to promote good code (not just code that sort of works). – Martin York Dec 14 '11 at 18:00
0
void main()
{

  int *aNumber = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int));
  int j = 10;
  for(int i = 2; i <= j; ++i)
  {
      aNumber = (int*) realloc(aNumber, sizeof(int) * i);
      j += 10;
  }

}

Hope this crashes. Cheers.

0
int main()
{
    int *p=3;
    int s;
    while(1) {
        s=*p;
        p++;
    }
}
  • 2
    It would be great to have some clarification :) – olyv Sep 17 '14 at 8:06
  • 1
    the p pointer will go beyond the program's address space which will be a memory error, as a process cannot access another process's memory. This will result the program to crash. pointer p is pointing to a random location in its address space, if it is incremented and dereferenced infinitely at some point it will point to another program's(process) address space. so it will crash after some time. – sc_cs Sep 17 '14 at 10:26
  • Or, hypothetically it could achieve integer overflow and wrap around, running infinitely. I'd try to use long long or size_t and start with p at the respective maximum value, or close to it, to crash faster. Though it's still not guaranteed to crash even in that case. – Patrick Roberts Jun 23 '15 at 0:42
0

A stylish way of doing this is a pure virtual function call:

class Base;

void func(Base*);

class Base
{
public:
   virtual void f() = 0;
   Base() 
   {
       func(this);
   }
};

class Derived : Base
{
   virtual void f()
   {
   }
};

void func(Base* p)
{
   p->f();
}


int main()
{
    Derived  d;
}

Compiled with gcc, this prints:

pure virtual method called

terminate called without an active exception

Aborted (core dumped)

0

You can use of assembly in your c++ code BUT INT 3 is only for x86 systems other systems may have other trap/breakpoint instructions.

int main()
{
    __asm int 3;

    return 0;
}

INT 3 causes an interrupt and calls an interrupt vector set up by the OS.

-2
char*freeThis;
free(freeThis);

Freeing an uninitialized pointer is undefined behavior. On many platforms/compilers, freeThis will have a random value (whatever was at that memory location before). Freeing it will ask the system to free the memory at that address, which will usually cause a segmentation fault and make the program crash.

protected by Macke Aug 18 '15 at 8:57

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