44
function intFromBytes( x ){
    var val = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < x.length; ++i) {        
        val += x[i];        
        if (i < x.length-1) {
            val = val << 8;
        }
    }
    return val;
}

function getInt64Bytes( x ){
    var bytes = [];
    var i = 8;
    do {
    bytes[--i] = x & (255);
    x = x>>8;
    } while ( i )
    return bytes;
}

I am trying to convert a javascript number to a byte array and then back to a number. However the above functions produce incorrect output with a very large number.

var array = getInt64Bytes(23423423);    
var value = intFromBytes(array);

console.log(value); //Prints 23423423 - correct

var array = getInt64Bytes(45035996273704);  
var value = intFromBytes(array);

console.log(value); //Prints -1030792152 - incorrect

It is my understanding that javascript floats are 53 bits so it shouldn't be overflowing? alert(Math.pow(2,53)) works fine.

  • 6
    Bit shifts are always performed on signed, 32-bits integers. – Crozin Dec 12 '11 at 23:18
  • That makes sense, make it an answer and i'll accept. Thanks – Ben Reeves Dec 12 '11 at 23:22
  • 2
    Since this question ranks high in google, it's probably worth pointing out that there are now array buffers: stackoverflow.com/questions/15761790/… – Melvin Sovereign Feb 7 at 15:56
14

In JavaScript bit shifts (>>, <<) are always performed on signed, 32-bits integers. This leads to range overflow for large numbers.

| improve this answer | |
47

Using the hint provided by Susanoh13, here are the two functions that allow conversion of number from/to ByteArray:

longToByteArray = function(/*long*/long) {
    // we want to represent the input as a 8-bytes array
    var byteArray = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0];

    for ( var index = 0; index < byteArray.length; index ++ ) {
        var byte = long & 0xff;
        byteArray [ index ] = byte;
        long = (long - byte) / 256 ;
    }

    return byteArray;
};

byteArrayToLong = function(/*byte[]*/byteArray) {
    var value = 0;
    for ( var i = byteArray.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        value = (value * 256) + byteArray[i];
    }

    return value;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Sometimes in byteArrayToLong() byteArray[i] is treated as a string (browser dependent) and the resultant value is calculated wrongly. I have solved by *1: value = (value * 256) + byteArray[i] * 1; – DrArt Jan 23 '14 at 16:18
  • 1
    You should specify whether this considers the bytes as containing signed or unsigned integers. – Drew Noakes Oct 18 '17 at 20:44
  • 2
    This doesn't work for negative numbers. Instead, large positive numbers are decoded. – ygoe Jun 19 '18 at 15:05
  • DON'T USE THIS CODE. This code would only be valid if Javascript numbers were 64 bit unsigned integers. However they are 64 bit floating point numbers, which only store up to 52 bits as an exact integer. This means that while this code works for many bytes (ex, [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7]), it will fail when all of the bits are actually used. Some failing cases are(where converting to a number and back again give a different result): ([255,255,255,255,255,255,255,255] => [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 255]), ([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] => [0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]), ([1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1] => [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1]) – yeerk Sep 12 at 17:38
5

try (** is power operator, << and >>> are bit-shift operators) - intFromBytes works only for arrays generated from positive integers

function getInt64Bytes(x) {
  let y= Math.floor(x/2**32);
  return [y,(y<<8),(y<<16),(y<<24), x,(x<<8),(x<<16),(x<<24)].map(z=> z>>>24)
}

function intFromBytes(byteArr) {
    return byteArr.reduce((a,c,i)=> a+c*2**(56-i*8),0)
}

function getInt64Bytes(x) {
  let y= Math.floor(x/2**32);
  return [y,(y<<8),(y<<16),(y<<24), x,(x<<8),(x<<16),(x<<24)].map(z=> z>>>24)
}

function intFromBytes(byteArr) {
    return byteArr.reduce((a,c,i)=> a+c*2**(56-i*8),0)
}


// TEST

let n = 40*2**40 + 245*2**32 + 194*2**24 + 143*2**16 + 92*2**8 + 40;
let b = getInt64Bytes(n);
let i = intFromBytes(b);

console.log(`number      : ${n}`);
console.log(`int to bytes: [${b}]`);
console.log(`bytes to int: ${i}`);

| improve this answer | |
  • The value for y in getInt64Bytes needs to be wrapped in Math.floor or else it breaks for negative integers. For example, getInt64Bytes(-Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER) returns [255, 224, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1] when it should return [255, 224, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1]. – snickle Nov 21 '19 at 21:12
  • @snickle this procedure works only for positive integers - the Math.floor not fix the problem in intFromBytes (e.g. when we put minus in let n= -... in snippet) - currently I don't have time to fix this problem - but fell free create your answer which develop my answer and fix this problem. – Kamil Kiełczewski Nov 21 '19 at 21:24
3

Doing a bit shift is the same as multiplying by 2^(# of bits+1), so instead of shifting the bits val = val<<8, you can just do val = val*256. See if that works.

| improve this answer | |
3

Brainfuck-style Lodash version. Just 4 lulz! don't use it!

const uintToArray = (uint, size) => _.chunk(_.padStart(uint, size*2,  0).split(''), 2).map((a)=>parseInt(a[0]+a[1]))
| improve this answer | |
1

If you happen to be on Node.js, Buffer is the correct way to handle any byte array/stream in Javascript/Typescript:

https://nodejs.org/api/buffer.html

Although the docs are more comprehensive, Stack Overflow recommends code snippets here in case that link 404s, so here are a couple of the most important code examples in that doc:

// Creates a Buffer containing the UTF-8-encoded bytes for the string 'tést':
// [0x74, 0xc3, 0xa9, 0x73, 0x74] (in hexadecimal notation)
// [116, 195, 169, 115, 116] (in decimal notation)
const buf6 = Buffer.from('tést');

// Creates a Buffer containing the bytes [1, 2, 3].
const buf4 = Buffer.from([1, 2, 3]);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Yes, to use buffer is the correct way to handle any byte array when is already a buffer or byte array. But the main question is: How do you convert an INTEGER to a byte array using Buffer? Buffer.from(INTEGER) is not allowed. TypeError [ERR_INVALID_ARG_TYPE]: The "value" argument must not be of type number. Received type number at Function.from (buffer.js:215:11) – Alberto Torre May 31 at 8:31
0
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>Uint32_To_Byte_Array</title>
    <script>
    function body_Add(Msg)
    {
        document.body.innerHTML = document.body.innerHTML + Msg;
    }
    class Byte 
    {
        constructor(Value) 
        {
            this.Number = new Uint8Array(1);
            this.Number[0] = Value;
        }
        get Get() 
        {
            return this.Number[0];
        }
        set Set(newValue) 
        {
            this.Number[0] = newValue;
        }
    };
    class Uint32
    {
        constructor(Value) 
        {
            this.Number = new Uint32Array(1);
            this.Number[0] = Value;
        }
        get Get() 
        {
            return this.Number[0];
        }
        set Set(newValue) 
        {
            this.Number[0] = newValue;
        }
    };
    var Conversion =
    {
        Uint32_To_Byte_Array: function(Source_Num)
        {
            var Uint32_Num = new Uint32(Source_Num);
            var Byte_Num = new Byte(0);
            var Byte_Arr = new Uint8Array(4);
            for (var i = 0; i < 4; i++)
            {
                if (Source_Num > 255)
                {
                    Uint32_Num.Set = Source_Num / 256;
                    Byte_Num.Set = Source_Num - Uint32_Num.Get * 256;
                }
                else
                {
                    Byte_Num.Set = Uint32_Num.Get;
                    Uint32_Num.Set = 0;
                }
                Byte_Arr[i] = Byte_Num.Get;
                Source_Num = Uint32_Num.Get;
            }
            return(Byte_Arr);
        },
        Byte_Array_To_Uint32: function(Source_Byte_Array, Start_Position)
        {
            var Uint32_Num = new Uint32(0);
            var Multiplier = 1;
            for (let i = 0; i < 4; i++)
            {
                Uint32_Num.Set = Uint32_Num.Get + Source_Byte_Array[Start_Position + i] * Multiplier;
                Multiplier = Multiplier * 256;
            }
            return (Uint32_Num.Get);
        }
    };
    function Load_Page()
    {
        var Numbers = [0,1,257,4294967295];
        Numbers.forEach(Convert);
        function Convert(Item, Index)
        {
            var Uint32_Number = Item;
            var Byte_Array = Conversion.Uint32_To_Byte_Array(Uint32_Number);
            var Uint32_Number_Restored = Conversion.Byte_Array_To_Uint32(Byte_Array, 0);
            body_Add("Conversion: Source number: " + Uint32_Number.toString() + ", Byte array: " + Byte_Array.toString() + ", Restored number: " + Uint32_Number_Restored.toString() + "<br>");
        };
    };
    </script>
</head>
<body onload="Load_Page()"> 
</body>

| improve this answer | |
  • Result:Conversion: Source number: 0, Byte array: 0,0,0,0, Restored number: 0; Conversion: Source number: 1, Byte array: 1,0,0,0, Restored number: 1; Conversion: Source number: 257, Byte array: 1,1,0,0, Restored number: 257; Conversion: Source number: 4294967295, Byte array: 255,255,255,255, Restored number: 4294967295 – Valery Rode Mar 3 '18 at 17:54

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