130

I need to ALTER my existing database to add a column. Consequently I also want to update the UNIQUE field to encompass that new column. I'm trying to remove the current index but keep getting the error MySQL Cannot drop index needed in a foreign key constraint

CREATE TABLE mytable_a (
ID          TINYINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
Name        VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE(Name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE mytable_b (
ID          TINYINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
Name        VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE(Name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE mytable_c (
ID          TINYINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
Name        VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE(Name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;


CREATE TABLE `mytable` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `AID` tinyint(5) NOT NULL,
  `BID` tinyint(5) NOT NULL,
  `CID` tinyint(5) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`),
  UNIQUE KEY `AID` (`AID`,`BID`,`CID`),
  KEY `BID` (`BID`),
  KEY `CID` (`CID`),
  CONSTRAINT `mytable_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`AID`) REFERENCES `mytable_a` (`ID`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `mytable_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`BID`) REFERENCES `mytable_b` (`ID`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `mytable_ibfk_3` FOREIGN KEY (`CID`) REFERENCES `mytable_c` (`ID`) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB;




mysql> ALTER TABLE mytable DROP INDEX AID;
ERROR 1553 (HY000): Cannot drop index 'AID': needed in a foreign key constraint
  • Assuming UNIQUE KEY AID on mytable? – Mike Purcell Dec 12 '11 at 23:21
  • yes that's the one – user391986 Dec 12 '11 at 23:28
194

You have to drop the foreign key. Foreign keys in MySQL automatically create an index on the table (There was a SO Question on the topic).

ALTER TABLE mytable DROP FOREIGN KEY mytable_ibfk_1 ; 
  • 11
    You might want to add it back after dropping the index: ALTER TABLE mytable ADD CONSTRAINT mytable_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (AID) REFERENCES mytable_a (ID) ON DELETE CASCADE; – laffuste Feb 11 '14 at 7:49
  • 8
    That's great, but what can I do if my FOREIGN KEY constraint was anonymous? – Pehat Jul 8 '16 at 14:48
  • @Pehat check my answer below stackoverflow.com/a/54145440/2305119 – thyzz Jan 11 at 11:16
  • Note: the foreign key might not be as obvious. To find all foreign keys related to a table and column, you can use this query: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/102371/… – charlax Jun 12 at 14:54
70

Step 1

List foreign key ( NOTE that its different from index name )

SHOW CREATE TABLE  <Table Name>

The result will show you the foreign key name.

Format:

CONSTRAINT `FOREIGN_KEY_NAME` FOREIGN KEY (`FOREIGN_KEY_COLUMN`) REFERENCES `FOREIGN_KEY_TABLE` (`id`),

Step 2

Drop (Foreign/primary/key) Key

ALTER TABLE <Table Name> DROP FOREIGN KEY <Foreign key name>

Step 3

Drop the index.

15

If you mean that you can do this:

CREATE TABLE mytable_d (
ID          TINYINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
Name        VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE(Name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;


ALTER TABLE mytable
ADD COLUMN DID tinyint(5) NOT NULL,
ADD CONSTRAINT mytable_ibfk_4 
      FOREIGN KEY (DID) 
        REFERENCES mytable_d (ID) ON DELETE CASCADE;

 > OK.

But then:

ALTER TABLE mytable
DROP KEY AID ;

gives error.


You can drop the index and create a new one in one ALTER TABLE statement:

ALTER TABLE mytable
DROP KEY AID ,
ADD UNIQUE KEY AID (AID, BID, CID, DID);
7

Because you have to have an index on a foreign key field you can just create a simple index on the field 'AID'

CREATE INDEX aid_index ON mytable (AID);

and only then drop the unique index 'AID'

ALTER TABLE mytable DROP INDEX AID;
4

A foreign key always requires an index. Without an index enforcing the constraint would require a full table scan on the referenced table for every inserted or updated key in the referencing table. And that would have an unacceptable performance impact. This has the following 2 consequences:

  • When creating a foreign key, the database checks if an index exists. If not an index will be created. By default, it will have the same name as the constraint.
  • When there is only one index that can be used for the foreign key, it can't be dropped. If you really wan't to drop it, you either have to drop the foreign key constraint or to create another index for it first.
  • you have the theory that other answers lacked. – Dennis Feb 8 at 22:20
  • So: If you have a compound unique index (multiple columns in a unique constraint) you cannot remove the unique A-B key unless you have an index for A and B. If you get this error, another table is using the index of column A or B, and you'll have to add those before you can safely remove the A-B unique. – Robin De Schepper May 6 at 9:24
  • @RobinDeSchepper Good remark. And when using compound unique indexes, the order of the fields is not important for the unique index, but it might be important for a foreign key. A unique index on A,B can be used by a foreign key on A, but not by a foreign key on B. – Stefan Mondelaers Jun 7 at 12:59
3

I think this is easy way to drop the index.

set FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1;

ALTER TABLE mytable DROP INDEX AID;

set FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;

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