494

This is a pretty simple question, at least it seems like it should be, about sudo permissions in Linux.

There are a lot of times when I just want to append something to /etc/hosts or a similar file but end up not being able to because both > and >> are not allowed, even with root.

Is there someway to make this work without having to su or sudo su into root?

  • Should not this be on Unix StackExchange? (not that I mind) – neverMind9 Jul 4 '18 at 14:28
  • 2
    @neverMind9 The question came from a shell script direction and also when the Unix/Linux exchange was created, it was decided it was way too late to migrate this one over. – David Jul 4 '18 at 17:01
  • Thanks to you for explaining it to me, @David. I was just wondering. – neverMind9 Jul 5 '18 at 13:59

13 Answers 13

713

Use tee --append or tee -a.

echo 'deb blah ... blah' | sudo tee --append /etc/apt/sources.list

Make sure to avoid quotes inside quotes.

To avoid printing data back to the console, redirect the output to /dev/null.

echo 'deb blah ... blah' | sudo tee --append /etc/apt/sources.list > /dev/null
  • 5
    I agree. Seems neater than start a new sh too, especially with potentially to do things with environment etc. – Sam Brightman Oct 16 '10 at 5:59
  • 36
    One important thing to note: NEVER forget the -a! Just imagine what a echo 'tmpfs /tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0' | sudo tee /etc/fstab would do – mic_e Feb 17 '13 at 8:00
  • 19
    Under OS X, this should be tee -a instead of tee --append. – knite Feb 17 '15 at 8:25
  • 22
    For those who don't understand what @mic_e said: without the -a (--append) flag the command would overwrite the whole file with the given string instead of appending it to the end. – totymedli Oct 22 '15 at 0:15
  • 6
    tee hee hee hee – Joe Heyming Apr 12 '17 at 17:40
275

The problem is that the shell does output redirection, not sudo or echo, so this is being done as your regular user.

Try the following code snippet:

sudo sh -c "echo 'something' >> /etc/privilegedfile"
  • What are "sudo permission boundaries"? It's just the shell which parses the redirection operator with higher precedence than a command for obvious reasons – Vinko Vrsalovic Sep 17 '08 at 16:22
  • Depending on your sh, echo can interpret escape sequences like \t inside single quotes. You could use printf %s 'something' instead. – user495470 Oct 2 '12 at 0:43
  • 1
    Will not work for echo $EVN_VARIBLE – Gordon Sun Jan 28 '16 at 19:39
  • 3
    This should be an accepted answer! – Slava Fomin II Aug 29 '16 at 19:39
  • 1
    This is the only one which works as-is as an SSH command which can be executed on a remote node. – Duncan Lock Jan 28 '17 at 4:41
28

The issue is that it's your shell that handles redirection; it's trying to open the file with your permissions not those of the process you're running under sudo.

Use something like this, perhaps:

sudo sh -c "echo 'something' >> /etc/privilegedFile"
  • 3
    Will not work for echo $EVN_VARIBLE – Gordon Sun Jan 28 '16 at 19:39
  • @GordonSun this is because sudo (for security reasons) doesn't propagate the environment to the subprocess. You may use sudo -E to bypass this restriction. – arielf Oct 30 '18 at 18:17
  • @GordonSun yes it will, I don't understand why you keep repeating this statement! If you do sudo sh -c "echo 'something' >> $FILENAME", with double quotes, this will work - the variable substitution is done by the outer shell, not the sudoed shell. – Nadav Har'El Jan 3 at 18:41
16
sudo sh -c "echo 127.0.0.1 localhost >> /etc/hosts"
  • 2
    Will not work for echo $EVN_VARIBLE – Gordon Sun Jan 28 '16 at 19:39
13

Doing

sudo sh -c "echo >> somefile"

should work. The problem is that > and >> are handled by your shell, not by the "sudoed" command, so the permissions are your ones, not the ones of the user you are "sudoing" into.

  • 3
    Will not work for echo $EVN_VARIBLE – Gordon Sun Jan 28 '16 at 19:39
9

I would note, for the curious, that you can also quote a heredoc (for large blocks):

sudo bash -c "cat <<EOIPFW >> /etc/ipfw.conf
<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\"?>

<plist version=\"1.0\">
  <dict>
    <key>Label</key>
    <string>com.company.ipfw</string>
    <key>Program</key>
    <string>/sbin/ipfw</string>
    <key>ProgramArguments</key>
    <array>
      <string>/sbin/ipfw</string>
      <string>-q</string>
      <string>/etc/ipfw.conf</string>
    </array>
    <key>RunAtLoad</key>
    <true></true>
  </dict>
</plist>
EOIPFW"
  • 1
    This works great, except the embedded quotes might need to be escaped with a \ – N Jones Aug 16 '15 at 3:48
  • Quite right @NJones! I shall edit my answer. (Note, however, that not doing this strips the internal " but does not cause the command to fail.) – msanford Aug 18 '15 at 14:52
8

In bash you can use tee in combination with > /dev/null to keep stdout clean.

 echo "# comment" |  sudo tee -a /etc/hosts > /dev/null
  • That should work in any POSIX shell, not just Bash. – Toby Speight Mar 15 '17 at 14:41
4

Using Yoo's answer, put this in your ~/.bashrc:

sudoe() {
    [[ "$#" -ne 2 ]] && echo "Usage: sudoe <text> <file>" && return 1
    echo "$1" | sudo tee --append "$2" > /dev/null
}

Now you can run sudoe 'deb blah # blah' /etc/apt/sources.list


Edit:

A more complete version which allows you to pipe input in or redirect from a file and includes a -a switch to turn off appending (which is on by default):

sudoe() {
  if ([[ "$1" == "-a" ]] || [[ "$1" == "--no-append" ]]); then
    shift &>/dev/null || local failed=1
  else
    local append="--append"
  fi

  while [[ $failed -ne 1 ]]; do
    if [[ -t 0 ]]; then
      text="$1"; shift &>/dev/null || break
    else
      text="$(cat <&0)"
    fi

    [[ -z "$1" ]] && break
    echo "$text" | sudo tee $append "$1" >/dev/null; return $?
  done

  echo "Usage: $0 [-a|--no-append] [text] <file>"; return 1
}
2

You can also use sponge from the moreutils package and not need to redirect the output (i.e., no tee noise to hide):

echo 'Add this line' | sudo sponge -a privfile
0

This worked for me: original command

echo "export CATALINA_HOME="/opt/tomcat9"" >> /etc/environment

Working command

echo "export CATALINA_HOME="/opt/tomcat9"" |sudo tee /etc/environment
  • 1
    Should be tee -a. Just tee will overwrite the file! – codeforester Apr 26 '18 at 17:28
0

By using sed -i with $ a , you can append text, containing both variables and special characters, after the last line.

For example, adding $NEW_HOST with $NEW_IP to /etc/hosts:

sudo sed -i "\$ a $NEW_IP\t\t$NEW_HOST.domain.local\t$NEW_HOST" /etc/hosts

sed options explained:

  • -i for in-place
  • $ for last line
  • a for append
0

echo 'Hello World' | (sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list)

  • This does not work – FractalSpace Oct 29 '18 at 16:21
  • which shell are you using ? it works on bash – Sudev Shetty Oct 31 '18 at 8:46
  • try now , its fixed – Sudev Shetty Oct 31 '18 at 8:53
  • It works now (it's practically the same as accepted answer) – FractalSpace Oct 31 '18 at 14:19
-6

Can you change the ownership of the file then change it back after using cat >> to append?

sudo chown youruser /etc/hosts  
sudo cat /downloaded/hostsadditions >> /etc/hosts  
sudo chown root /etc/hosts  

Something like this work for you?

  • 4
    Chown is a destructive command to use. If a config manager used that to update /etc/hosts, suddenly /etc/hosts belongs to config user and not root. which potentially leads to other processes not having access to /etc/hosts. The whole point of sudo is to avoid having something logged into root and via sudoers more restrictions can be piled on as well. – David Jan 22 '17 at 0:39

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