26

Is there a way to add an "All values" option to an enum without having to change its value every time a new value is added to the enum?

[Flags] 
public enum SomeEnum
{
    SomeValue =  1,
    SomeValue2 = 1 << 1,
    SomeValue3 = 1 << 2,
    SomeValue4 = 1 << 3,
    All = ?
}

Update:

Ended up inheriting from long and using long.MaxValue for All option.

3
  • -1 will make me do a special treatment for that value and I wont be able to use HasFlag method.
    – Gil Stal
    Commented Dec 13, 2011 at 11:37
  • you are generally testing [Flags] enums for discrete bits anyway - in which case it should work absolutely fine. Commented Dec 13, 2011 at 11:45
  • Actually I want an "All option" that HasFlag will return true no matter which option I test.
    – Gil Stal
    Commented Dec 13, 2011 at 12:57

8 Answers 8

43

Since you should define the empty value in a Flags enum such as None = 0, the simplest way of defining the Allvalue is by simply inverting all the bits inNone`.

[Flags]
enum MyEnum
{
   None = 0,
   A = 1,
   B = 2,
   C = 4,
   ...
   All = ~None
}

Note that ~0 instead of ~None will not work for unsigned backing types as that is -1, which is not a valid value for unsigned.

Edit: Answer was modified to use an inverted None instead of an explicit constant such as 0x7FFFFFFF or ~0, as this also works for unsigned

8
  • ah, ninja edit to add an extra FF renders my comment obsolete ;p Commented Dec 13, 2011 at 11:25
  • 2
    You can also set the value of the All enumeration to ~0, which is functionally the same. I just get bamboozled seeing all those F's next to eachother.
    – Wells
    Commented May 15, 2013 at 18:25
  • 14
    I disagree with -1, 0xFFFFFFFF or ~0 solution. When you assume All = -1 than (SomeEnum.SomeValue | SomeEnum.SomeValue2 | SomeEnum.SomeValue3 | SomeEnum.SomeValue4).HasFlag(SomeEnum.All) is false. Maybe something like All = (SomeValue4 << 1) - 1 could help
    – tykovec
    Commented Aug 1, 2013 at 13:35
  • When I try this I get "Cannot implicitly convert type 'uint' to 'int'."
    – tofutim
    Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 16:37
  • I updated the answer to include other integer types. Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 22:35
18

It should be like this:

[Flags] 
public enum SomeEnum
{
    SomeValue =  1,
    SomeValue2 = 1 << 1,
    SomeValue3 = 1 << 2,
    SomeValue4 = 1 << 3,
    All = SomeValue | SomeValue2 | SomeValue3 | SomeValue4
}
2
  • 5
    I don't disagree, but note the OP is explicitly asking for a maintenance-free option. I kinda agree that explicit is best, though. Commented Dec 13, 2011 at 11:32
  • I also like this explicit approach and to solve the maintenance problem I would add a unit test that at least warns the user if a new option is added to the enum and not to the All OR, but there could be another problem: in my case I need to track if the user explicitly selected the All option (= also option added in the future should be considered) or if the user selected all the present options one by one (= option added in the future should not be considered), so I need to use All = ~None because it has a different value. Commented Mar 28, 2022 at 6:35
5

An enum can be made of many different length integer types (short, int, long). This makes the #FFFFFFFF solution inappropriate (as pointed out in @MarcGravell comment).

An enum can be made of unsigned types (uint for isntance). This makes the -1 solution inappropriate.

My best bet is, maintenance-free:

All = ~0
3

The Idea is to use the behavior of the enum to calculate the last value.

Add Last field after all 'real' enum values.

Add All field equals to (Last << 1) - 3.

[Flags]
public enum SomeEnum
{
    SomeValue =  1,
    SomeValue2 = 1 << 1,
    SomeValue3 = 1 << 2,
    SomeValue4 = 1 << 3,

    // Do not add values after this
    Last,
    All = (Last << 1) - 3,
}

I answered it at: How to use Enum with aditional options (All, None)

You can check my blog at Enum Trick for more information and ideas.

2
  • I'm sure you mean All = ((Last - 1) << 1) - 1 ? Commented Jan 7, 2015 at 9:27
  • Actually no... assume you have 4 bit flags. LAST = 1001 = last flag + 1. LAST << 1 = 10010 = next flag + 2. Subtract 3 from that and you get next flag - 1 (10000 - 1 = 1111 in our example), or all actual values.
    – Alicia
    Commented Nov 7, 2018 at 20:23
2

No, there is nothing built is that will make such an All option automatically update when the Enum changes.

You may want to have a special value (monitor value) that means All (say -1), even if it is not the bitwise sum of all of the options.

An alternative is to use a value that has all of the bits switched on:

All = 0xFFFFFFFF
1
  • 1
    One reason I prefer -1 to 0xFFFFFFFF... now imagine you want to change to short or long Commented Dec 13, 2011 at 11:33
0

You can use a little trick

(SomeEnum)( (1 << ( Enum.GetValues( typeof(SomeEnum) ).Length ) ) -1 )

If you added a 'None' Enum name with value = 0 ( None = 0, ) then you need to put a '-1' after the Length.

2
  • I like the idea but not the implementation
    – Brackets
    Commented Oct 29, 2022 at 13:42
  • Also, you need to put -1 whether you have None or not.
    – Brackets
    Commented Oct 29, 2022 at 13:47
0

This is possible if you're okay with a static readonly field in a separate type, rather than as a const enum field:

[Flags] 
public enum SomeEnum
{
    None       = 0,
    SomeValue  = 1,
    SomeValue2 = 1 << 1,
    SomeValue3 = 1 << 2,
    SomeValue4 = 1 << 3,
}

public static class SomeEnumUtility {

    private static readonly SomeEnum[] _someEnumValues = (SomeEnum[])Enum.GetValues( typeof(SomeEnum) );
    public static readonly SomeEnum SomeEnum_All = GetSomeEnumAll();

    // Unfortunately C# does not support "enum generics" otherwise this could be a generic method for any Enum type
    private static SomeEnum GetSomeEnumAll() {

        SomeEnum value = SomeEnum.None; // or `(SomeEnum)0;` if None is undefined.
        foreach(SomeEnum option in _someEnumValues) {
            value |= option;
        }
        return value;
    }
}

Then you can get SomeEnumUtility.SomeEnum_All. As it's a static readonly the computation is only performed once, in a thread-safe manner.

As I wrote in the code-comment, it's unfortunate that C# does not support enum generics, otherwise you could do this:

    private static TEnum GetEnumAllFlags<TEnum>() where TEnum : enum {

        TEnum[] allValues = Enum.GetValues<TEnum>();

        TEnum value = (TEnum)0;
        foreach(TEnum option in allValues) {
            value |= option;
        }
        return value;
    }

Oh well :(

1
  • although it look cool, but it always require the processing of the function. if it's not matter, i rather like the <EnumBaseType(like int, byte)>.MaxValue, or the None and All=~None option Commented Jan 16, 2018 at 7:58
0
public static T EnumSetAll<T>() where T : struct, Enum
  {
    string str = string.Join(", ", Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)));

    if (Enum.TryParse<T>(str, out var e))
      return e;

    return default;
  }

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