Im having a problem... does anyone knows why this code hangs in the while loop. The loop doesn't seem to catch the last line of the stdout.

working_file = subprocess.Popen(["/pyRoot/iAmACrashyProgram"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

line = working_file.stdout.readline()
working_file.stdout.flush()
while working_file != "" :
    print(line)
    line = working_file.stdout.readline()
    working_file.stdout.flush()

the script hangs with the curser just blinking when readline() is encountered. I dont understand why. can anyone shed some light

Thanks all

jon

  • 1
    Going on a guess here, but I've found that p.stdout.read*() will always be a blocking call, and if there isn't any data to return, then it keeps blocking. A nonblocking read may help you out. – John Doe Dec 13 '11 at 20:43
  • at the risk of sounding like a massive idiot could you explain what you meen by nonblocking read, thanks :) – jonathan topf Dec 13 '11 at 20:46
  • read() will hang if there's no data to read. It will only return once there is data (or enough of it) to return. A nonblock read causes it to return data immediately, and if there is none, then no data will be returned. Thus it doesn't hang (or, it's not a blocking call: nonblocking call). – John Doe Dec 13 '11 at 20:49
  • Does the program want input on stdin? – Fred Foo Dec 13 '11 at 21:15
  • it will do eventully – jonathan topf Dec 13 '11 at 21:17

Does doing a nonblocking read help you out?

import fcntl
import os

def nonBlockReadline(output):
    fd = output.fileno()
    fl = fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL)
    fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, fl | os.O_NONBLOCK)
    try:
        return output.readline()
    except:
        return ''

working_file = subprocess.Popen(["/pyRoot/iAmACrashyProgram"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

line = nonBlockReadline(working_file.stdout)
working_file.stdout.flush()
while working_file != "" :
    print(line)
    line = nonBlockReadline(working_file.stdout)
    working_file.stdout.flush()

I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to do, but will this work better? It just reads all the data, instead of reading only one line at a time. It's a little more readable to me.

import fcntl
import os

def nonBlockRead(output):
    fd = output.fileno()
    fl = fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL)
    fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, fl | os.O_NONBLOCK)
    try:
        return output.read()
    except:
        return ''

working_file = subprocess.Popen(["/pyRoot/iAmACrashyProgram"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

stdout = ''

while working_file.poll() is None:
    stdout += nonBlockRead(working_file.stdout)

# we can probably save some time and just print it instead...
#print(stdout)

stdout = stdout.splitlines()
for line in stdout:
    print(line)

Edit: A generalized script which should be more suited for your use case:

import fcntl
import os

def nonBlockRead(output):
    fd = output.fileno()
    fl = fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL)
    fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, fl | os.O_NONBLOCK)
    try:
        return output.read()
    except:
        return ''

working_file = subprocess.Popen(["/pyRoot/iAmACrashyProgram"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

while working_file.poll() is None:
    stdout = nonBlockRead(working_file.stdout)

    # make sure it returned data
    if stdout:
        # process data
        working_file.stdin.write(something)
  • You get an A for effort. I hope this works. (Thanks by the way, I learned quite a bit from this.) – FakeRainBrigand Dec 13 '11 at 20:57
  • wow, ill try it out, i cant say i fully understand it all though:) Im actually trying to write a python script that launches an external process and listens to it, then based on its output writes some values to its stdin. im a little out of my depth though, i feel like there must be a more elegant way than what im trying, you live and you learn :) – jonathan topf Dec 13 '11 at 21:09
  • Based on your use case, it's possible that the blocking may have nothing to do with your issue, but hopefully this'll still help out. I added a script more suited for your problem, however it's still nonblocking (but that can easily be fixed with working_file.stdout.readline()). – John Doe Dec 13 '11 at 21:17
  • I just thought is this only going to work on unix systems? – jonathan topf Dec 14 '11 at 10:52
  • Actually yes. Apparently fcntl is Unix only. The equivalent to fcntl is win32api, but apparently it's non trivial to port it... :/ – John Doe Dec 14 '11 at 17:48

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